Should all buildings without cavity be lime plastered and rendered?

limeplastering

Active Member
Let me make this easy for you to understand

It's not my house so I don't care what material they use.
I've probably done more lime render jobs than you so believe it or not I understand
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oh right cool yer thats called a COWBOY where im from. The fact you know your doing some thing wrong is worse then people putting on the wrong stuff by mistake.
 

Vincey

Private Member
Tbh you are right there lime plastering, I've enjoyed the debate on this thread but orange mans attitude stinks , I'd never employ him
 

flynnyman

Well-Known Member
Mr irish spread you said and i quote....I have seen thousands and thousands of single skin walls, the vast majority of pre war walls are solid walls.
Portland cement was invented in 1824 buildings with cavitys didnt come round until the 1920's almost nearly every thing in between is built in lime what ever the size of the wall.
YOU ARE WRONG MY FRIEND
Why dont you google sand and cement on walls with no cavity like you suggested to do for some reason all you can do is find information telling you not to do it i wonder why?
Let me guess the internet is wrong im wrong the surveyors are wrong and your right:birra:
At last, now we can move on, oh before we go any where was that wall rendered that you posted up?
 

irish_spread

Private Member
Mr irish spread you said and i quote....I have seen thousands and thousands of single skin walls, the vast majority of pre war walls are solid walls.
Portland cement was invented in 1824 buildings with cavitys didnt come round until the 1920's almost nearly every thing in between is built in lime what ever the size of the wall.



And your point is ???
 

irish_spread

Private Member
YOU ARE WRONG MY FRIEND
Why dont you google sand and cement on walls with no cavity like you suggested to do for some reason all you can do is find information telling you not to do it i wonder why?
Let me guess the internet is wrong im wrong the surveyors are wrong and your right:birra:


I'll tell you what I'll google brain surgery and then I'll be a brain surgeon .
You're right I suppose, the Internet wouldn't tell porkies
 

rlcleary1

New Member
Tbh you are right there lime plastering, I've enjoyed the debate on this thread but orange mans attitude stinks , I'd never employ him

My point was and still is if the customer doesn’t want to pay to use a breathable render then it’s there choice!!
I’m not going to worry about it at all
I’ll advice as much as possible
They own the house and its business for me my friend
[emoji106]


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Vincey

Private Member
My point was and still is if the customer doesn’t want to pay to use a breathable render then it’s there choice!!
I’m not going to worry about it at all
I’ll advice as much as possible
They own the house and its business for me my friend
[emoji106]


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
No worries mate it’s been a good thread
 

Ajax123

Active Member
I just spent a very entertaining 10 minutes reading this thread. I think that wattle and daub hand made using mud, dung and a bit of clay is the correct way to progress...
 

Brimstone

Well-Known Member
Last time I heard the debate about 6" vs 9" it was a joke about why girls back cars into walls ! (Because they've been told by the fella he's a 9incher)
In that pic of his stripped wall, the ground floor below the beam was solid flemish bond one brick, nominally 9 inch but brick sizes vary hugely with the brickmaker. Above it was a single half-brick stretcher bond.
Common practice to save weight on the structure, and(mainly) to save money by using less bricks and a faster build time. Quite common in agricultural parts because the bricks were made actually on the estate or nearby.
Timbers might well have been reclaimed from a previous building, looks like it due to their condition and that looks like a sufflok latch inside hook - on the outside!
 

Stevieo

Royal Spin Doctor
I work mostly in Brighton which is mostly victorian houses and a lot of bungaroosh walls and have never seen a spread using lime render/plaster. Only seen lime added to sand and cement!
I went to Brighton once.

I had occasion to walk the length of the promenade in the course of my business there and was puzzled not to be able to see the tower.

Then it dawned on me..
 

writingmonkey

New Member

LKSF

New Member
I've been pondering what to finish my walls with inside a damp, solid rubble filled walled house.
I've been poking around the various lime zealot FB pages and it seems to me that the people who chose lime plaster live in damp, stained and dusty houses and think that's acceptable. Lime transfers water, lime breathes, it's what you want on the outside of an old building, but i'd question whether you want it on the inside.
 
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