New to plastering and desperately need some advice!

#1
Hello all,

Apologies if this is a bone question. I've taken all the tiles off in the kitchen, and the wall underneath is solid, but uneven (see photos). I want to tile over the top, but pretty sure I need to prepare the wall in some way. I looked at bonding plaster, but the Gypsum website says you can't tile directly onto it. I also found a product called Bal Quickset Render, which purports to do what I need perfectly, but literally nowhere online sells it. Is there an easy solution? Am I barking up completely the wrong tree?

Any advice will be hugely appreciated.

Andy
 

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ChrispyUK

Well-Known Member
#2
Hello all,

Apologies if this is a bone question. I've taken all the tiles off in the kitchen, and the wall underneath is solid, but uneven (see photos). I want to tile over the top, but pretty sure I need to prepare the wall in some way. I looked at bonding plaster, but the Gypsum website says you can't tile directly onto it. I also found a product called Bal Quickset Render, which purports to do what I need perfectly, but literally nowhere online sells it. Is there an easy solution? Am I barking up completely the wrong tree?

Any advice will be hugely appreciated.

Andy
What tiles are going on Andy?

Scrape off all the high spots and if not too bad, I'd prime with SBR and level it up with some rapid set tile adhesive.
At least then you could start tiling the same day or next. If really rough, bond the worst bits, then skim. Will need to dry well before tiling though. A kitchen splashback is not as critical as a bathroom and the approach varies depending on your tiling/plastering skill set. Either way, when tiling, its easier if the walls are flat to start with...that's the key.
 
#3
What tiles are going on Andy?

Scrape off all the high spots and if not too bad, I'd prime with SBR and level it up with some rapid set tile adhesive.
At least then you could start tiling the same day or next. If really rough, bond the worst bits, then skim. Will need to dry well before tiling though. A kitchen splashback is not as critical as a bathroom and the approach varies depending on your tiling/plastering skill set. Either way, when tiling, its easier if the walls are flat to start with...that's the key.
Thank you so much for getting back to me! :)

The tiles are light, metro tiles (see photo - just a random thumbnail to illustrate tile type). As the area to be tiled is quite small, I can't see the weight of the tiles being an issue.

So, if I've understood you, once the wall is primed, I can use rapidset tile adhesive to build up areas of the wall, making the wall flat, then leave to go off, before tiling at a later stage?
 

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ChrispyUK

Well-Known Member
#4
Thank you so much for getting back to me! :)

The tiles are light, metro tiles (see photo - just a random thumbnail to illustrate tile type). As the area to be tiled is quite small, I can't see the weight of the tiles being an issue.

So, if I've understood you, once the wall is primed, I can use rapidset tile adhesive to build up areas of the wall, making the wall flat, then leave to go off, before tiling at a later stage?
Yep. That's what I'd probably do, based on the fact that I could get on and tile it quicker. If I bond and skim, then will prob need to leave it a week to dry out.
Obviously without seeing it in the flesh, its always difficult to advise dn exact approach.