How do I stop this damp?

Rmd

New Member
It does help though if it won't work it won't work that's called help.
To be fair mate, your man there has a point, I'm asking what DO I do, not what DONT i do! Its a legitimate question I'm looking for a answer to, telling me what not to do, doesn't solve the problem and get the job done.
 

flynnyman

Well-Known Member
To be fair mate, your man there has a point, I'm asking what DO I do, not what DONT i do! Its a legitimate question I'm looking for a answer to, telling me what not to do, doesn't solve the problem and get the job done.
Google Newton membrane and you have your answer, I bid you farewell on this thread and good luck xx
 

vfr12

MOTORC*NT
Yeah, now I look like a c**t. Just went through the thread and saw my posts, after yours:whistle: .....and I think now I sound like a c**t :fuckyou:.
 

sponker

Member
Don't use the Newton its too expensive like I've said. Here is the link for the generic product. Thanks Danny

https://www.twistfix.co.uk/damp-proofing-membrane?cat=32102

Like I say if its a DIY job and your not a plasterer its a no brainer. It will keep the damp at bay. You will just need someone to skim the board but you could tape and joint yourself if needs be. If you use it fair enough if not then tats fine as well. Just trying to put a few options on the table for you. Modern ones at that
 

vfr12

MOTORC*NT
To be fair mate, your man there has a point, I'm asking what DO I do, not what DONT i do! Its a legitimate question I'm looking for a answer to, telling me what not to do, doesn't solve the problem and get the job done.
What you have to do is to find where the water is coming from in a first place. Neutralising it can pretty much solve the problem. What you have done to the external has just moved the evaporation point to the inside of the house. I am 99%sure if you haven't treated the externals you never would of have "rising damp" inside. Water just finds a way to evaporate even above 1.5m . It can be damaged pipe, rain water etc. We all can suggest what to do, but none of us can tell you what to do and what not, before looking at it.
 

carlos

Private Member
Get a few damp firms in to quote and spec the work. There's loads in your area. Just remember to ask how much a inspection is as some charge.

There's a lot of people on here that don't believe in rising damp. How ever I do and it's a big industry.

PCA registered company's are supposed to be the mark of quality, there's search your contractor on there website.


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adapt

Active Member
Greetings

Right lets try and work out your issues first, yes a pic is good but not always gives you the full view. Could you tell us your internal floor heights compared to external ? Also the drainage around your property is it good or does the garden get sodden ?
It looks to me that you have an elevated level of ground water affecting the party walls. Party walls never have a DPC in them if they are brick I have found.
Ground conditions are as important as testing for moisture levels, you have to play detective.
 

Grant Singer

Active Member
We do a lot of damp work on membrane and the only problem with it is if your walls have a thin 2coat,time the membrane is on it just a skim and the stuff we plaster on has never been tight ever flappy as f**k and you just need knock it and you can push it in. I absolutely hate the stuff. If the damp boys do there job right limelite is my choice. But if there is plenty off depth to dab a board then you could
Membrane it and do it your self no bother.
 

Grant Singer

Active Member
Meant to ask was there a guarantee with the work done on the outside? And very unusual to inject the outside and not strip and redo the walls inside.
 

Dropsalot

Private Member
Skirts off, hack off, brush away salts, get a reputable spread in to use either lime lite + finish, or s/c+waterproofed and skim. If the floor is solid, do not let any plaster of any sort come into contact with it .
Good luck.
 

Arti

Well-Known Member
We do a lot of damp work on membrane and the only problem with it is if your walls have a thin 2coat,time the membrane is on it just a skim and the stuff we plaster on has never been tight ever flappy as f**k and you just need knock it and you can push it in. I absolutely hate the stuff. If the damp boys do there job right limelite is my choice. But if there is plenty off depth to dab a board then you could
Membrane it and do it your self no bother.
What happens to the moisture that runs down the back of the membrane if you have a concrete floor?
 

Grant Singer

Active Member
That's always been my concern with membrane. Where does it go if it's still there. We just sub for a preservation company. So I'll let them worry about that, although I have told them countless times that membrane is sh**e.
But I wouldn't have it in my own house limelite and if there still is damp you will be able to see it.
 

Jgreenplastering

Private Member
Usually though above ground you won't have running water coming through the wall so you shouldn't get water pooling at the bottom onto a concrete floor.
Tanking a wall holds the moisture back so you would have the same issue unless you tank the floor but then you can't always be sure what your tanking over unless you dig the floor up.
They all have there pro's and cons it's knowing which system is best to use for each project.


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Dropsalot

Private Member
Arti is right. Membrane redirects moisture, stops it from coming through the decoration, then you need a sump and pump to get rid of it. Pump it out of the building into a drain run and then repeat.......forever.
Dropsalot.
 

Jgreenplastering

Private Member
Arti is right. Membrane redirects moisture, stops it from coming through the decoration, then you need a sump and pump to get rid of it. Pump it out of the building into a drain run and then repeat.......forever.
Dropsalot.
Not above ground you don't though do you.
It's only re directed when below ground when it needs to be redirected.

Above ground it serves the same purpose and does exactly the same
as tanking, it stops the moisture from showing through into the finished wall coating.


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Arti

Well-Known Member
Not above ground you don't though do you.
It's only re directed when below ground when it needs to be redirected.

Above ground it serves the same purpose and does exactly the same
as tanking, it stops the moisture from showing through into the finished wall coating.


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How can it only direct moisture below ground not above? Without sounding pedantic how does it know? The decorated surface/ backing plaster absorbs the moisture if you replace that with a plastic membrane that moisture has to go somewhere
 

Jgreenplastering

Private Member
How can it only direct moisture below ground not above? Without sounding pedantic how does it know? The decorated surface/ backing plaster absorbs the moisture if you replace that with a plastic membrane that moisture has to go somewhere
You won't get running water above ground will you, you'll also very very rarely get water shooting through your wall, so a membrane hardly directs the water, it's just an non destructive and more flexible alternative to cementitious tanking.
It's also preferred as the pressure buildup on the structure below ground is non existent up to tanking.

Above ground most cases of damp aren't caused by continuous moisture unless it's a leak which needs to be sorted anyway.
So you won't really have moisture to the extent of it running down the wall in my
Opinion.
It would usually just evaporate.
If it's that's bad then the source of the damp needs identifying and fixing instead of covering up with tanking/membranes anyway.



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Arti

Well-Known Member
I appreciate your not getting shooting water above ground. my point is a membrane is a system designed for directing moisture. The decorated surface or backing plaster etc absorbs that moisture above dpc level and evaporate to salts in most cases. If you replace that absorption with a plastic membrane that moisture must go somewhere. I'm just saying it's designed for a specific application and imo a quick fix and quick fixes with damp issues always come back to bite you
 

Jgreenplastering

Private Member
I appreciate your not getting shooting water above ground. my point is a membrane is a system designed for directing moisture. The decorated surface or backing plaster etc absorbs that moisture above dpc level and evaporate to salts in most cases. If you replace that absorption with a plastic membrane that moisture must go somewhere. I'm just saying it's designed for a specific application and imo a quick fix and quick fixes with damp issues always come back to bite you
Yea that's a fair point but i personally wouldn't use it on saturated walls, If it's extreme I'd look to solve with something else.

The manufacturers actually have specific membranes for above ground now so it's not a bodge way, just not like traditional methods.
If the damp isn't extreme but the plaster is in need of replacement then there won't be enough moisture to cause issues behind the membrane. You could still inject and then use the membrane for a quick turnaround. Perfect for landlords, developers etc.



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Jgreenplastering

Private Member
What would be the point of injecting and using the membrane?
If it's rising the injection will stop future moisture rising, the membrane will stop the transfer of salts or damp through to the new finish.


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Jgreenplastering

Private Member
It will take no time till shows on the wall in the next room or anywhere else
We were on about external walls I think. Even so the same would happen if you tank it or if you inject and only treat the one side would it not???


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vfr12

MOTORC*NT
We were on about external walls I think. Even so the same would happen if you tank it or if you inject and only treat the one side would it not???


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Rising damp is the common description for evaporating and water traveling . How would you stop this process if you put barriers only on the visual pats that the water has found?
 

Jgreenplastering

Private Member
Rising damp is the common description for evaporating and water traveling . How would you stop this process if you put barriers only on the visual pats that the water has found?
What you banging on about? That don't make sense or I'm reading it wrong?


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