How do I stop this damp?

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flynnyman

Well-Known Member
Speaking to a lad who does houses up who is selling one, he dabbed the walls coz I was busy and nobody knows how to float a wall in Grimsby. He is getting cold spots and asked me how he could get rid so I said wallpaper and get shut as quick as possible lol sad but true
 

vfr12

MOTORC*NT
Speaking to a lad who does houses up who is selling one, he dabbed the walls coz I was busy and nobody knows how to float a wall in Grimsby. He is getting cold spots and asked me how he could get rid so I said wallpaper and get shut as quick as possible lol sad but true
I can't give you like and funny and agree at the same time, but here are the other two(y). And bare in mind is still recommended on here.
 

adapt

Active Member
Looking at the pics I would say its probably a rising damp issue, but you need to check to make sure the plaster is chopped back from the floor also to ensure its isolated. What I find in older brick houses is they tended to incorporate a form of dpc in the external walls of the house. But on internal walls they seemed to leave them out ?
Maybe they didn't really think about it as much in them days.

If it was a job of mine I would
  1. Hack off the plaster
  2. Anti sulphate
  3. Inject with a DPC " what ever system is down to you"
  4. Render coat incorporating a SBR and DPC render mix if you want to be OTT paint on some tanking too after the render has gone off
  5. Either renderlite/limelite or dab a 25mm insulated plaster board.
  6. Skim
Also check the door is sealed correctly, the silicone does break down over time.
 

zolco

Private Member
I bet noone had the million pound idea, put a tap on it if it's soaking wet. Bottle it sell it to the rich, they will love it (y)
 

bopper

Active Member
You need to tell us a bit more if you want a solution, it's been patched before I can see it in the pics, the skirting is not original and in one of the pics had been removed before, the door casing hardly has a threshold so tell us the full story or we are wasting our time and yours.
Well could you imagine my delight when I seen this thread Flynny.....rmd we will all have something to say on your problem with damp,but before hand could we see some pics of outside your front door and the front of the house,cheers .
 

mark121

Member
View attachment 13456 View attachment 13458 View attachment 13456 View attachment 13458 Hi all, new to TPF, looking for advice on how to stop my damp problem. I have damp patches in various places on the ground floor of my 1900's terraced house, main place being the hallway (old quarry tiles on the floor, not sure what's underneath) and the dining room, ( solid floor, might be concrete, had a self leveller on it,) All damp patches are from the skirting up. I know about chopping off the plaster, drying out and re doing it, but is that all that needs to be done? Attaching a couple of pics
rofl..we should start a damp proof company...all you do is get a website copy and paste wording from someone elses (who know what there talking about) and your qualified to start work.And a printer to make certificates.
 

vfr12

MOTORC*NT
rofl..we should start a damp proof company...all you do is get a website copy and paste wording from someone elses (who know what there talking about) and your qualified to start work.And a printer to make certificates.
Not bad for 3 days with us
 

Jenniferslauth

New Member
I would suggest you to contact nearest damp proofing specialist they will help you with all elements of damp, including rising damp, salt damp, lateral damp and other damp problems.
 

irish_spread

Private Member
I would suggest you to contact nearest damp proofing specialist they will help you with all elements of damp, including rising damp, salt damp, lateral damp and other damp problems.

I've got no roof on my house and the upstairs carpet is very wet. Do they do carpet damp as well ?
 
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