How do I stop this damp?

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Rmd

New Member
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image.jpeg image.jpeg Hi all, new to TPF, looking for advice on how to stop my damp problem. I have damp patches in various places on the ground floor of my 1900's terraced house, main place being the hallway (old quarry tiles on the floor, not sure what's underneath) and the dining room, ( solid floor, might be concrete, had a self leveller on it,) All damp patches are from the skirting up. I know about chopping off the plaster, drying out and re doing it, but is that all that needs to be done? Attaching a couple of pics
 

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flynnyman

Well-Known Member
View attachment 13456 View attachment 13458 View attachment 13456 View attachment 13458 Hi all, new to TPF, looking for advice on how to stop my damp problem. I have damp patches in various places on the ground floor of my 1900's terraced house, main place being the hallway (old quarry tiles on the floor, not sure what's underneath) and the dining room, ( solid floor, might be concrete, had a self leveller on it,) All damp patches are from the skirting up. I know about chopping off the plaster, drying out and re doing it, but is that all that needs to be done? Attaching a couple of pics
When did you notice it? How longs it been there? What work have you done recently before you had this problem.
 

vfr12

MOTORC*NT
When did you notice it? How longs it been there? What work have you done recently before you had this problem.
What's your neighbour like? Attached or detached ? Did you check your plumbing ? Picture from outside?You don't have a pool in the basement right ?
Location?
And yes, you should find out what's underneath if you want to deal with the problem
 

Rmd

New Member
What's your neighbour like? Attached or detached ? Did you check your plumbing ? Picture from outside?You don't have a pool in the basement right ?
Location?
And yes, you should find out what's underneath if you want to deal with the problem
Regular mid terraced house, no basement, damp mainly on internal and party walls
 

flynnyman

Well-Known Member
No work done, been like it for years.
You mean since you've lived there? Does it get worse in the winter or when it's been raining? Like what's been said have you spoke to the neighbours to see if they have a had a problem or work done?
 

flynnyman

Well-Known Member
You need to tell us a bit more if you want a solution, it's been patched before I can see it in the pics, the skirting is not original and in one of the pics had been removed before, the door casing hardly has a threshold so tell us the full story or we are wasting our time and yours.
 

vfr12

MOTORC*NT
You need to tell us a bit more if you want a solution, it's been patched before I can see it in the pics, the skirting is not original and in one of the pics had been removed before, the door casing hardly has a threshold so tell us the full story or we are wasting our time and yours.
Or dig out that waste pipe ffs
 

Rmd

New Member
You mean since you've lived there? Does it get worse in the winter or when it's been raining? Like what's been said have you spoke to the neighbours to see if they have a had a problem or work done?
House was bought in 2011, damp showed up on a survey on the external walls, money knocked off the price rather then the seller dealing with it. Dpc "dealt with" on external walls by drilling and injecting from outside. Current problem on the internal and party walls was noticed 6-12 months after, and has not grown or seem to be affected by anything. Neighbours not mentioned anything nor had work done during this time, but wouldn't count them as reliable sources of information either.
 

sponker

Member
Take it back to brick then stick a membrane such as Newton or similar to the wall adn dab board to that if your doing this yourself and your not skilled. Its not so epxpensive as you think. Were about are you?
 

leebo02

Well-Known Member
remove skirting ,hack off plaster (about 1.2 to 1.5m high ) scratch coat with s@c (washed sand) with sika water proffer in, 3 coats of vandex and replaster
 

vfr12

MOTORC*NT
Take it back to brick then stick a membrane such as Newton or similar to the wall adn dab board to that if your doing this yourself and your not skilled. Its not so epxpensive as you think. Were about are you?
Oh yeah do that
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or even better- injection and waterproof render up to 1m. If you want to sleep tide at night- up to 2m
 

sponker

Member
Reread the thread fella. Hes not a plasterer but a DIYer. Do you think hes going to use sand and cement? Your picture shows membrane with no air gap at the foot and sitting on a concrete florr. . Just expressing my opinion if thats okay. Done right the membrane works fine. Its used in a lot of heritage projects
 

flynnyman

Well-Known Member
House was bought in 2011, damp showed up on a survey on the external walls, money knocked off the price rather then the seller dealing with it. Dpc "dealt with" on external walls by drilling and injecting from outside. Current problem on the internal and party walls was noticed 6-12 months after, and has not grown or seem to be affected by anything. Neighbours not mentioned anything nor had work done during this time, but wouldn't count them as reliable sources of information either.
The dpc wasn't dealt with it had one, you just wasted your money coz it's still damp, forget the Newton it's a con unless your doing a cellar with a high water level. Forget injecting that's more bullshit just hack off it's probably been plastered with browning that simple.
 
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sponker

Member
The newton membrane works just fine if you want to do it yourself. You can get cheaper genericalternatives online and locally. Don't be put off by others giving the thumbs down to this method and others. If they didn't work would there be a market for them? No. This shows what I am talking about


If Danny says it is okay I will post a cheaper alternative were I buy it
 

irish_spread

Private Member
View attachment 13456 View attachment 13458 View attachment 13456 View attachment 13458 Hi all, new to TPF, looking for advice on how to stop my damp problem. I have damp patches in various places on the ground floor of my 1900's terraced house, main place being the hallway (old quarry tiles on the floor, not sure what's underneath) and the dining room, ( solid floor, might be concrete, had a self leveller on it,) All damp patches are from the skirting up. I know about chopping off the plaster, drying out and re doing it, but is that all that needs to be done? Attaching a couple of pics

Hit the plaster with a hammer. You'll find the undercoat is a gypsum plaster, probably pink. Render using Rendermix. @zolco , closer to you probably.
 

flynnyman

Well-Known Member
The newton membrane works just fine if you want to do it yourself. You can get cheaper genericalternatives online and locally. Don't be put off by others giving the thumbs down to this method and others. If they didn't work would there be a market for them? No. This shows what I am talking about


If Danny says it is okay I will post a cheaper alternative were I buy it
It works when used for the right job not just to cover s**t up and hide it, it doesn't stop damp.
 

sponker

Member
Just trying to give the fella some advice, he can make up his mind after reading everything rather than just listening to people saying this wont work and that wont work.That doesn't help help really What was your advice or didn't you give it??
 
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vfr12

MOTORC*NT
Reread the thread fella. Hes not a plasterer but a DIYer. Do you think hes going to use sand and cement? Your picture shows membrane with no air gap at the foot and sitting on a concrete florr. . Just expressing my opinion if thats okay. Done right the membrane works fine. Its used in a lot of heritage projects
I did fella , that was addressed to you. Don't know how many heritage projects have you done but they won't be for a long around. Masking the problem is not solving the problem, was my point. He had it on the external , which were treated , more or less, the way you are suggesting to do with the internals. Membrane ,dpm or waterproof render won't solve it until you find where the water s coming from because it will find a way to shine trough again.And then what- it's plasterers fault again .
 
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flynnyman

Well-Known Member
Just trying to give the fella some advice, he can make up his mind after reading everything rather than just listening to people saying this wont work and that wont work.That doesn't help help really What was your advice or didn't you give it??
I gave him advice don't waste your money on unnecessary work and tricks that don't work :)
 

flynnyman

Well-Known Member
Just trying to give the fella some advice, he can make up his mind after reading everything rather than just listening to people saying this wont work and that wont work.That doesn't help help really What was your advice or didn't you give it??
It does help though if it won't work it won't work that's called help.
 

vfr12

MOTORC*NT
It's a good system for a basement. For anything else there are way way cheaper methods and materials
The newton membrane works just fine if you want to do it yourself. You can get cheaper genericalternatives online and locally. Don't be put off by others giving the thumbs down to this method and others. If they didn't work would there be a market for them? No. This shows what I am talking about


If Danny says it is okay I will post a cheaper alternative were I buy it
 

Danny

Administrator
The newton membrane works just fine if you want to do it yourself. You can get cheaper genericalternatives online and locally. Don't be put off by others giving the thumbs down to this method and others. If they didn't work would there be a market for them? No. This shows what I am talking about


If Danny says it is okay I will post a cheaper alternative were I buy it
Post away

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