Large plaster repair & re-skimming

Seb963

New Member
Hi

I need to repair a pretty large hole in the old plaster (see picture). I have removed all loose plaster down to the masonry and need some advice on what type of plaster to use to fill the hole. The hole is about 1m by 40cm by 1.5cm deep. I am new to plastering.
Should I apply a browning plaster first, f1ollowed by a finishing plaster? If so, which product/brand do you recommend?
Or can I use a ready-mixed filler - my fear is this will require quite a lot of it, and be expensive.
Should I apply PVA on the brickwork before applying the plaster?

On a second topic, this repair is part of a larger project - i.e. reskimming the whole room (walls and ceiling) on the existing old plaster (see second picture attached). The plaster was wallpapered and I stripped the wallpaper to reveal the old skim coat.
I have a few questions:
- Is PVA required on old plaster that was wallpapered?
- Which skimming coat product should I use? Thistle Multi-finish? Ready-mixed repair & skim product? Joint compound? Any advice on product & brand welcome

As the walls and ceilings will be painted, and not wallpapered, the finish needs to be good and avoid any future cracks. How to avoid the risk of future cracks in the skim coat? I know this can't necessarily be prevented. I could also considering applying a lining wallpaper that can be painted, but much more time consuming...

Thanks

Seb
 

Attachments

Last edited by a moderator:

Nicm

Well-Known Member
It's not what you want to hear but your better off getting an experienced plasterer in and paying him well for a good job.There's DIY and then bigger jobs like this one.Anyway best of luck with it.
 

Seb963

New Member
I am a DIYer. I know that getting a plasterer in would be easier, but I am on a budget hence would like to try doing it myself.
Any advice appreciated
 

Seb963

New Member
I am a guy who is doing renovation works in the house and trying to do some myself to save some money.
If this forum is not the right place to get the answer, then fine. I do not wish to waste your time as much as mine. I am genuinely looking for advice
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Jurek

Private Member
Hi

I need to repair a pretty large hole in the old plaster (see picture). I have removed all loose plaster down to the masonry and need some advice on what type of plaster to use to fill the hole. The hole is about 1m by 40cm by 1.5cm deep. I am new to plastering.
Should I apply a browning plaster first, f1ollowed by a finishing plaster? If so, which product/brand do you recommend?
Or can I use a ready-mixed filler - my fear is this will require quite a lot of it, and be expensive.
Should I apply PVA on the brickwork before applying the plaster?




On a second topic, this repair is part of a larger project - i.e. reskimming the whole room (walls and ceiling) on the existing old plaster (see second picture attached). The plaster was wallpapered and I stripped the wallpaper to reveal the old skim coat.
I have a few questions:
- Is PVA required on old plaster that was wallpapered?
- Which skimming coat product should I use? Thistle Multi-finish? Ready-mixed repair & skim product? Joint compound? Any advice on product & brand welcome




As the walls and ceilings will be painted, and not wallpapered, the finish needs to be good and avoid any future cracks. How to avoid the risk of future cracks in the skim coat? I know this can't necessarily be prevented. I could also considering applying a lining wallpaper that can be painted, but much more time consuming...


upload_2016-1-31_18-4-54.png




Thanks

Seb
 

uni-king

Private Member
I am a DIYer. I know that getting a plasterer in would be easier, but I am on a budget hence would like to try doing it myself.
Any advice appreciated
If you are genuine the best bit of advice is save up then get a spread in its not just a little wall ur doing ur trying to attempt a fair size bit of work
 

Fatarm

Trainee mod
Your suffering a large bout of paranoia kitchy.....:frenetico:.how do you know the op has blagged his way into to someones house?
 

flynnyman

Well-Known Member
Sorry about the suspicion mate it's coz @Kitchy had his pants down of another plasterer on here and it's sent him mad. Fill the thick stuff with sand and cement then pre grit the wall and skim away. There is a search facility at the top you should find out everything you need to know in there and if you get stuck on descriptions of stuff just ask oh and welcome.
 

Jurek

Private Member
you dont really have to pregrit it, seb. diluted pva will be fine. you will need a bit of easi fill or joint compound to tidy it up afterwards, to be honest, with it being your first attempt. its not that big a job were you to get someone in. but maybe you just wanna have a go. heres a good video with a few pointers. check out his other vids as well


pva the walls for the skim coat. wet down the walls for the renovating plaster / sand and cement. leave a few days for the sand and cement or a day for the renovating plaster. mix a handful of the fibres in the clean water then add the plaster to that . put some eml over the timber .
 
Last edited:

vfr12

MOTORC*NT
@ Kitchy: Not sure what being a courser mean or what you think my intention on this forum are. I am a guy who is doing renovation works in the house and trying to do some myself to save some money.
If this forum is not the right place to get the answer, then fine. I do not wish to waste your time as much as mine. I am genuinely looking for advice
It's the right place, just wait for the right people to reply. And don't worry about Kitchy, he just HATES coursers ! It's just beyond him to understand people sometimes, but ones you get along with him is like purring cat:D.
 

Jurek

Private Member
or you could just patch the hole with some board. a few dabs of bonding stick the board on top then bond over that :whistle:
 

leebo02

Well-Known Member
make sure you put some eml over the timber, make sure it goes well over the bricks that the timber is sitting on, i also put some scrim on that part of the floating before i set it but thats just me
 

Danny

Administrator
OK... the point of this forum is to help others out... a question was asked in the DIY section...

If you dont want to help or answer it then dont bother...
 

Fatarm

Trainee mod
Yeh!! The headmaster's busy enough without having to give out punny's,lines,detention,:rayos:.......


bring back the belt:crying:
 
Last edited:

Danny

Administrator
you dont really have to pregrit it, seb. diluted pva will be fine. you will need a bit of easi fill or joint compound to tidy it up afterwards, to be honest, with it being your first attempt. its not that big a job were you to get someone in. but maybe you just wanna have a go. heres a good video with a few pointers. check out his other vids as well


pva the walls for the skim coat. wet down the walls for the renovating plaster / sand and cement. leave a few days for the sand and cement or a day for the renovating plaster. mix a handful of the fibres in the clean water then add the plaster to that . put some eml over the timber .
Thanks for answering that :D
 

OAP

New Member
You can see how old I am by my user name. I joined TPF because I have
decided to do some skimming in my flat.
I think TPF is wonderful and I can spend a lot of time on the site.
I was a painter and dec. for thirty years. My first effort at skimming was
flat and smooth enough for a high-class paint or paper finish. I said to
myself at the start that plastering is a process in so many stages, hence
the mystery of it can be reduced.
A positive attitude can take you a long way but I know that you cannot
just wish away limitations. Plastering is a skilful and honourable trade
that certainly takes time to master but from what I have been reading on the forum many of you delude yourselves by thinking that the skill is
akin to The Magic Circle.
I like the posts that encourage DIYers to have a go for they are the spreads
that show some humility.
Please do not respond with:"Another DIYer who has become a master-
craftsman overnight." I would like thousands more to try plastering and
I wish I had tried it when I was younger. This response is a praising of
plastering so please do not be offended. Great site.
 

Dropsalot

Private Member
You can see how old I am by my user name. I joined TPF because I have
decided to do some skimming in my flat.
I think TPF is wonderful and I can spend a lot of time on the site.
I was a painter and dec. for thirty years. My first effort at skimming was
flat and smooth enough for a high-class paint or paper finish. I said to
myself at the start that plastering is a process in so many stages, hence
the mystery of it can be reduced.
A positive attitude can take you a long way but I know that you cannot
just wish away limitations. Plastering is a skilful and honourable trade
that certainly takes time to master but from what I have been reading on the forum many of you delude yourselves by thinking that the skill is
akin to The Magic Circle.
I like the posts that encourage DIYers to have a go for they are the spreads
that show some humility.
Please do not respond with:"Another DIYer who has become a master-
craftsman overnight." I would like thousands more to try plastering and
I wish I had tried it when I was younger. This response is a praising of
plastering so please do not be offended. Great site.
Nice post mate.
As for your flat, go for it. It can be very rewarding when you get it right.
Magic circle!! Pftttt......lol
All the best.
 

flynnyman

Well-Known Member
You can see how old I am by my user name. I joined TPF because I have
decided to do some skimming in my flat.
I think TPF is wonderful and I can spend a lot of time on the site.
I was a painter and dec. for thirty years. My first effort at skimming was
flat and smooth enough for a high-class paint or paper finish. I said to
myself at the start that plastering is a process in so many stages, hence
the mystery of it can be reduced.
A positive attitude can take you a long way but I know that you cannot
just wish away limitations. Plastering is a skilful and honourable trade
that certainly takes time to master but from what I have been reading on the forum many of you delude yourselves by thinking that the skill is
akin to The Magic Circle.
I like the posts that encourage DIYers to have a go for they are the spreads
that show some humility.
Please do not respond with:"Another DIYer who has become a master-
craftsman overnight." I would like thousands more to try plastering and
I wish I had tried it when I was younger. This response is a praising of
plastering so please do not be offended. Great site.
Hi welcome to the forum :) you posted yesterday and it came up in moderation because your new, I deleted it because it was so random and sometimes we get spammers who try to infiltrate the site, I do apologise :)
 

Clutch & Tap

Active Member
If you have the confidence to have a go then good luck to you. I will offer advice first that PVA is your friend and essential if you are planning a reskim, coat your walls well and until it starts to run down the wall, this will indicate when it is covered enough.

Use Multi finish as this will give you a longer setting time than Board. Mix well and only do one wall at a time, don't try to do too much at once.

Also do not panic or rush, you have more time than you think (especially this time of year).

The system I would advise for skim is...

1) first coat, go left to right top, then left to right bottom. Flaten and brush your angles.
2) laying in coat.. Follow the same as first, this coat will flaten out and fill out.
3) trowel up using a clean trowel and try not to take skim off.
4) another trowel up with sprinkles of water if needed.
5) Dry trowel, try not to over do it. You don't want it like a mirror, more like eggshell.

Hope this helps.
 

Dropsalot

Private Member
That was good of you Dropsalot, appreciated.
No worries mate, welcome, @Clutch & Tap has suggested a good method, remember 'small is good', and cover everything you don't want plastered, the best of us splash it about like cheap aftershave most of the time. Effort spent masking and covering is never wasted.
Good luck, post pics when you've done.
 

macca13

New Member
No worries mate, welcome, @Clutch & Tap has suggested a good method, remember 'small is good', and cover everything you don't want plastered, the best of us splash it about like cheap aftershave most of the time. Effort spent masking and covering is never wasted.
Good luck, post pics when you've done.
Great post and some good advice well executed
 
Top