Does this rendering look acceptable?

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Wezly

Well-Known Member
How does that work on say a gable with about 1.5m gap between that an next door?
How do they work in general? That off a gen aswell?
The heaters require electric and gas, if your tight to the neighbour even better as its only a roof to plonk on the scaffold that side.
 

Jgreenplastering

Private Member
The heaters require electric and gas, if your tight to the neighbour even better as its only a roof to plonk on the scaffold that side.

Can you lay on in any condition with a scaffold roof and heater then?
Would they be left on overnight?
Sorry for questions just interested as not used them before.
 

keithuk

Private Member
ImageUploadedByThe Plasterers Forum1447703594.881130.jpg
it can be done !living the dream !lol
 

Josh55

Member
@Josh55
Personally If someone came to me with your problem now id do one of 2 things. I'd agree a price and schedule of works and then I'd do the following.
1) I'd wait till next year when weather is dry and better again. Then I'd hack it all off and start from scratch doing it properly.
2) I'd hack it all off asap and then possibly get a scratch coat on and then leave till next year to finish off.
Last thing you want to do is try and rush it and it goes wrong again.
I can't see you finding someone decent who will be able to squeeze that in before Xmas. I def couldn't, all my exterior jobs I've already booked in for March onwards.
The weather is going to get a lot wetter and colder in the next few weeks as winter is coming.
If you try and rush it you risk it failing or going wrong again.
Also you really need to come to an agreement with whoever done it and recoup all or as much is realistically possible?
Ideally you want money back from them, if you agree for them to put scaffold back up and hack off the existing then your again at there mercy. They could easily mess that up!
I'd advise against going over what's there as if it's as bad as it looks any guarantee from a new Renderer will only stretch to what they do. If the existing comes off or gets worse it will spoil the new finish so your back to square one with more money down the drain.
The idiots who done it have already gone over most of what was on there before anyway so that weight aswell as another coat isn't a great idea.
How you go about sorting the problem from here will determine the lifespan of the correctly applied new finish. Do it right and it will cost you another considerable outlay but you won't have to touch it again.
Do it wrong and try to save money now and it will cost you again in the near future.
Best of luck I hope it goes well from now.
Hey Thanks for you input, much appreciated. Do you think it's advisable to fill in the cracks with something and wait until good weather to start over? I'm worried about getting damp.
 

Jgreenplastering

Private Member
Hey Thanks for you input, much appreciated. Do you think it's advisable to fill in the cracks with something and wait until good weather to start over? I'm worried about getting damp.

I don't think one winters worth of rain would cause you damage. The cracks are only hair line so the water would take a long time to penetrate the render and the building substrate before it affected you internally.

If they have come through since painting maybe put some filler in but it won't cause you lasting damage if left.
 

Josh55

Member
I don't think one winters worth of rain would cause you damage. The cracks are only hair line so the water would take a long time to penetrate the render and the building substrate before it affected you internally.

If they have come through since painting maybe put some filler in but it won't cause you lasting damage if left.
Cheers, that sounds reassuring.
 

Josh55

Member
Could the reason for the unevenness seen here be because the workers did not take off all the old render like they were supposed to? At the front of the house you can see some of the old render they didn't take off. Or more likely just bad technique?
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Front of house with old grey render showing.

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GrantyBoy

Well-Known Member
Bad technique. It's not great and you shouldn't have paid them but it's not the end of the world, your house isn't going to fall down.
 

paddy5

Active Member
Hardly , but it could be because they suffer from depression, alcoholism and most likely very low self esteem, or a cocktail of all three.

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Daddycool

New Member
Hi
I've had the side my house rendered but to me the job looks rough. The photos don't show how bad it really looks-not very smooth like I was told it would be. And the edges are not straight. Some bits have fallen off and underneath it is crumbly-a builder came and looked at it and said the mix was not right and it should be rock hard. Is he right? There's also a lot of cracks which looks bad and I'm worried water will get in them. The people who did it came and did some bad looking patching. From the pics what do you think?
Cheers View attachment 8116 View attachment 8119 View attachment 8120 View attachment 8121 View attachment 8122 View attachment 8123 View attachment 8125 View attachment 8126 View attachment 8127 View attachment 8128
 

Daddycool

New Member
It like like more of a repair job rather than a new build. You can't make a silk purse out of a sows ear . I've seen worse
 

Doggit

New Member
Bit late on this post, but I'll throw my tuppence worth in anyway.
Josh got screwed by a relative, and they're the ones you feel you should be able to trust; and yes, seeing the pictures of the plastering, he should have realised that the guy wasn't up to the job, but sometimes, if you're not in the game, you're at the mercy of the cowboys.
As to the crap job, get a building surveyor in to asses the job and write a report, then have a quite chat with the family member before you issue proceedings in the small claims court.
Josh, you didn't mention much about the internal damp problems. Rising damp would only go up about a metre, so I suspect you had condensation problems caused by either cold external walls, or lack of ventilation, or both. If it's cold external walls, then you should have gone for external wall insulation rather than cement render - and the builder should have known that. My partner has a 1930 3 bed semi that's solid brick walls, and the people next door keep all the window shut, and are having horrendous mould problems. But because the partners house is cold, I've been putting on EWI because the green deal companies were completely overpriced (£16,000 for Kent). The previous owners had done a crap job of moving doors and windows around, and left the brickwork at the rear in a messy state. I looked at K-rend etc to tidy up, but came across a company supplying good quality EWI stuff from Poland, and the materials have come in at under £2500. It's a bit more labour than just doing cement render, but the house is already warmer. And having put in a wood burning stove, the heatings hardly been on lately.
The point I'm trying to make, is that whilst there's some sensible suggestions to tidying up the existing crap job, you may still find you've got a problem. How have the damp problems been since the job was done. If you are in need of EWI, then add the cost of the removal of the render to the small claims court proceeding, - or if you intend to try and keep the family happy, then suggest the guy removes the crap he put on so you can start again properly.
 

uni-king

Private Member
Bit late on this post, but I'll throw my tuppence worth in anyway.
Josh got screwed by a relative, and they're the ones you feel you should be able to trust; and yes, seeing the pictures of the plastering, he should have realised that the guy wasn't up to the job, but sometimes, if you're not in the game, you're at the mercy of the cowboys.
As to the crap job, get a building surveyor in to asses the job and write a report, then have a quite chat with the family member before you issue proceedings in the small claims court.
Josh, you didn't mention much about the internal damp problems. Rising damp would only go up about a metre, so I suspect you had condensation problems caused by either cold external walls, or lack of ventilation, or both. If it's cold external walls, then you should have gone for external wall insulation rather than cement render - and the builder should have known that. My partner has a 1930 3 bed semi that's solid brick walls, and the people next door keep all the window shut, and are having horrendous mould problems. But because the partners house is cold, I've been putting on EWI because the green deal companies were completely overpriced (£16,000 for Kent). The previous owners had done a crap job of moving doors and windows around, and left the brickwork at the rear in a messy state. I looked at K-rend etc to tidy up, but came across a company supplying good quality EWI stuff from Poland, and the materials have come in at under £2500. It's a bit more labour than just doing cement render, but the house is already warmer. And having put in a wood burning stove, the heatings hardly been on lately.
The point I'm trying to make, is that whilst there's some sensible suggestions to tidying up the existing crap job, you may still find you've got a problem. How have the damp problems been since the job was done. If you are in need of EWI, then add the cost of the removal of the render to the small claims court proceeding, - or if you intend to try and keep the family happy, then suggest the guy removes the crap he put on so you can start again properly.
Parklife...

Soz @superspread had to use ur line there
 

User___removed

Well-Known Member
I did a house end of my street hacked off re-did with that ratio and used Webber mesh not 1 crack to this day did it 2 years ago and I'd no about it if it cracked he'd be on me like f**k as he's like that
Each to there own.the weaker the mix the less chance you have with it cracking
 

FreeD

Private Member
Bit late on this post, but I'll throw my tuppence worth in anyway.
Josh got screwed by a relative, and they're the ones you feel you should be able to trust; and yes, seeing the pictures of the plastering, he should have realised that the guy wasn't up to the job, but sometimes, if you're not in the game, you're at the mercy of the cowboys.
As to the crap job, get a building surveyor in to asses the job and write a report, then have a quite chat with the family member before you issue proceedings in the small claims court.
Josh, you didn't mention much about the internal damp problems. Rising damp would only go up about a metre, so I suspect you had condensation problems caused by either cold external walls, or lack of ventilation, or both. If it's cold external walls, then you should have gone for external wall insulation rather than cement render - and the builder should have known that. My partner has a 1930 3 bed semi that's solid brick walls, and the people next door keep all the window shut, and are having horrendous mould problems. But because the partners house is cold, I've been putting on EWI because the green deal companies were completely overpriced (£16,000 for Kent). The previous owners had done a crap job of moving doors and windows around, and left the brickwork at the rear in a messy state. I looked at K-rend etc to tidy up, but came across a company supplying good quality EWI stuff from Poland, and the materials have come in at under £2500. It's a bit more labour than just doing cement render, but the house is already warmer. And having put in a wood burning stove, the heatings hardly been on lately.
The point I'm trying to make, is that whilst there's some sensible suggestions to tidying up the existing crap job, you may still find you've got a problem. How have the damp problems been since the job was done. If you are in need of EWI, then add the cost of the removal of the render to the small claims court proceeding, - or if you intend to try and keep the family happy, then suggest the guy removes the crap he put on so you can start again properly.

fell asleep reading this
 

Peter Tully

New Member
'Waterproofer' doesn't make it waterproof, silly as it may seem.
Unless you use the likes of triple strength medusa.
I'm talking along the lines of evoplast, febproof etc, these only reduce the amount of water that penetrates, so the water can go both ways, which is why they aren't suitable for swimming pools etc.


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I have plastering for 40years and never used pva on outside
 
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