Ceiling flatness after skimming

BigMacks

Member
Okay I'm probably over thinking this and obsessing over small detail, but my plasterer just finished up skimming newly boarded ceiling and previously skimmed/painted walls a few days ago.

Now I'm not expecting walls to be level or flat because my house is old Victorian so everything is out of place. But I did spend time knocking down old ceiling and levelling with new plasterboard using laser level so I expect it to be pretty much bang on.

When I put a flat spirit level against ceiling I notice slight hollow spots in some places about 1 to 2 mm maybe like shown in pic. Overall it looks pretty fine and flat but only when you observe very closely and pay close attention you can see.

Is this to be expected and will it be even noticeable once all painted white?
 

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spread95

Active Member
Okay I'm probably over thinking this and obsessing over small detail, but my plasterer just finished up skimming newly boarded ceiling and previously skimmed/painted walls a few days ago.

Now I'm not expecting walls to be level or flat because my house is old Victorian so everything is out of place. But I did spend time knocking down old ceiling and levelling with new plasterboard using laser level so I expect it to be pretty much bang on.

When I put a flat spirit level against ceiling I notice slight hollow spots in some places about 1 to 2 mm maybe like shown in pic. Overall it looks pretty fine and flat but only when you observe very closely and pay close attention you can see.

Is this to be expected and will it be even noticeable once all painted white?
Cock!!!
 

Stevieo

Royal Spin Doctor
Okay I'm probably over thinking this and obsessing over small detail, but my plasterer just finished up skimming newly boarded ceiling and previously skimmed/painted walls a few days ago.

Now I'm not expecting walls to be level or flat because my house is old Victorian so everything is out of place. But I did spend time knocking down old ceiling and levelling with new plasterboard using laser level so I expect it to be pretty much bang on.

When I put a flat spirit level against ceiling I notice slight hollow spots in some places about 1 to 2 mm maybe like shown in pic. Overall it looks pretty fine and flat but only when you observe very closely and pay close attention you can see.

Is this to be expected and will it be even noticeable once all painted white?
 

zombie

Private Member
Okay I'm probably over thinking this and obsessing over small detail, but my plasterer just finished up skimming newly boarded ceiling and previously skimmed/painted walls a few days ago.

Now I'm not expecting walls to be level or flat because my house is old Victorian so everything is out of place. But I did spend time knocking down old ceiling and levelling with new plasterboard using laser level so I expect it to be pretty much bang on.

When I put a flat spirit level against ceiling I notice slight hollow spots in some places about 1 to 2 mm maybe like shown in pic. Overall it looks pretty fine and flat but only when you observe very closely and pay close attention you can see.

Is this to be expected and will it be even noticeable once all painted white?

Ffs
 

BryanJ

Well-Known Member
Only a problem when you play snooker on the ceiling the ball roll to the hollow.
Unless you packed out the timber joists, then the plasterboards would not have been within 1-2mm.
If you can live with the walls being out, then the ceiling has been done to match the walls.
 

BigMacks

Member
Only a problem when you play snooker on the ceiling the ball roll to the hollow.
Unless you packed out the timber joists, then the plasterboards would not have been within 1-2mm.
If you can live with the walls being out, then the ceiling has been done to match the walls.

I used straight metal studs secured and levelled to the joists and plasterboards fitted to the metal studs. Maybe it was a variation in plasterboards hmm.
 

bof

Well-Known Member
I used straight metal studs secured and levelled to the joists and plasterboards fitted to the metal studs. Maybe it was a variation in plasterboards hmm.
I go back to one of my first posts

Lol

expand...
So your worried about space , it's too much mess to remove but prepared to remove part , you sir are a customer heaven sent lol
 

BigMacks

Member
I go back to one of my first posts

Lol


So your worried about space , it's too much mess to remove but prepared to remove part , you sir are a customer heaven sent lol
Honestly WTF is the point of digging out old posts. You know what F U C K IT!!! No point in posting in this forum to get some toxic fu ck ing replies. Full of arrogant people who seem too proud and stuck up to give a decent informed reply but instead just bash people.
 

John j

Mono Don
Honestly WTF is the point of digging out old posts. You know what F U C K IT!!! No point in posting in this forum to get some toxic fu ck ing replies. Full of arrogant people who seem too proud and stuck up to give a decent informed reply but instead just bash people.
Could be your frame that's out. Ever thought that
 

BryanJ

Well-Known Member
Honestly WTF is the point of digging out old posts. You know what F U C K IT!!! No point in posting in this forum to get some toxic fu ck ing replies. Full of arrogant people who seem too proud and stuck up to give a decent informed reply but instead just bash people.
bashful snow white and the seven dwarves GIF
 

BigMacks

Member
@DIYMatt - why don't you do some research. Yes, you are being totally anal obsessive and wrong.


Your are very lucky it is only 1 or 2 mm, your spread was star.

Okay thanks for the reply. Appreciate the link and yeah like I said I'm just over thinking and obsessing over small detail that won't matter in the end....but I put that down to bad experiences with tradesmen in past who pay no attention to detail, but I guess time is money for them and they just want to get the job done and go.

Main thing I wanted to clarify was if my plasterer had done a good job or not and so wanted the opinion of others if something like this was standard...just to put my mind at ease. Thank you.
 

spread95

Active Member
Obviously he thinks we're a load of backstabbing c**ts that have nothing better to do than slag each others work off on a poxy forum. ;)
 

Stevieo

Royal Spin Doctor
Honestly WTF is the point of digging out old posts. You know what F U C K IT!!! No point in posting in this forum to get some toxic fu ck ing replies. Full of arrogant people who seem too proud and stuck up to give a decent informed reply but instead just bash people.
Can you f**k**g see it without a straight edge?

No.

So it's fine.

Go and measure something else.
 

BigMacks

Member
He's better with words than me, you just didn't like the truthful answer to your question.

Cool I'm a cock for trying to get the professional opinion of another plasterer to determine if this was good standard of plastering job or not. No problem.
 

Monkey Boy

Well-Known Member
It is fine
If you put the level on it before it was skimmed you may have seen the same deviation
If plaster boards are stored for a while leaning up against a wall they can distort/become bowed. It can bow between joists if the centres are greater than 400mm imo

When it is painted it will look exactly the same when you hold a level up to it but we do not live in houses to hold levels up against ceilings but probably watch TV or swipe smart phones all day and send gifs
788407C8-ADF7-4C33-8117-32D6B48B87B1.gif
 

spread95

Active Member
From a professional point. Yes you are obsessing over a small detail, we are plasterers not engineers, using a product that varies daily, manufactured to a very poor quality to produce a reasonably flat and smooth finish for decoration which I think you have.

To borrow another forumers catchphrase
Your Welcome! Cock!
 

BigMacks

Member
Yes., Instead of doing a bit of research yourself

I do sincerely apologise sir for making use of this forum to ask the "opinion" of someone else in the trade and taking your time out of the day for an answer (exactly why forums like this exist).

I can do all the research I want but its the professional opinion I'm after, something which may not be documented on some site or official document. And one of the main reasons I asked was someone else told me things like these are usually taken care of when the plasterer goes over using an ox speedskim or similar tool. But everyone has their own opinion and way of doing things I suppose.
 

raggles

Private Member
Honestly WTF is the point of digging out old posts. You know what F U C K IT!!! No point in posting in this forum to get some toxic fu ck ing replies. Full of arrogant people who seem too proud and stuck up to give a decent informed reply but instead just bash people.
Like a good dummy spit.

1 to 2mm variation on flatness is perfectly acceptable on a ceiling. Now for instance if prior to quoting any tradesman is presented with a spec of say
+ \ - 0 .5mm he would price plan and carry out the work accordingly.
Everything made and produced is done so, using specific tolerances.
Even the laser level you used has an accuracy tolerance.
Rest assured you have been left with a finished surface flatness which is acceptable.
 

BigMacks

Member
Like a good dummy spit.

1 to 2mm variation on flatness is perfectly acceptable on a ceiling. Now for instance if prior to quoting any tradesman is presented with a spec of say
+ \ - 0 .5mm he would price plan and carry out the work accordingly.
Everything made and produced is done so, using specific tolerances.
Even the laser level you used has an accuracy tolerance.
Rest assured you have been left with a finished surface flatness which is acceptable.
Thank you again. Has given me reassurance.
 
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