Advice Needed - Cowboy Plasterers

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Deleted member 29624

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You just don't smell right to me and my point has been all along if the work is bad the tradesman deserves the right to rectify and get paid
 

paulf

Well-Known Member
Surely if your place was built in 1932 and if the cornice was run in situ then your ceiling would be traditional lath and plaster not plasterboard as you stated?
I'm sure I've worked on properties with that type of cove not cornice on old plasterboard.
 
You just don't smell right to me has been my point all along and if the work is bad the tradesman deserves the right to rectify and get paid

Ok, the way he can rectify it is to take the ceiling down and replace it and the plaster work to original standard, as he’s now made it impossible to do the job properly.

The reality is the best he can offer to do is make his botch job a slightly neater botch job. What good is that to me and why should I let someone who’s taken the piss and caused me this headache, another opportunity?
 
Find the roughest section and put wall paper steamer on it. You'll soon know if it's going to delaminate.

Do you think the paper could still be removed? I’ve spoken to several plasterers today about scrapping the plaster off and starting again. None of them have been clear if this is possible, but I’m wondering if it’s more to do with them not wanting to do it. If it’s possible though, I would do it myself.

My thinking is there is a layer of thick paper between the new plaster and the old, so they can’t be bonded. Am I wrong here?
 

Cockney1

Well-Known Member
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Can someone offer some advice.

  • The ceiling is plaster board.
  • The cove is in situ plasterwork that’s worth keeping.
  • The ceiling has been skimmed over paper without my consent and to a poor standard.

What would you do if it was your property?

Thanks.
 

algeeman

It’s A Boy
Do you think the paper could still be removed? I’ve spoken to several plasterers today about scrapping the plaster off and starting again. None of them have been clear if this is possible, but I’m wondering if it’s more to do with them not wanting to do it. If it’s possible though, I would do it myself.

My thinking is there is a layer of thick paper between the new plaster and the old, so they can’t be bonded. Am I wrong here?

Ive never plastered over paper ....even small bits left peel away.
If it hasnt come down yet take a paint scraper to it.
If its solid you should just paint it.
If your sat there worried about it ....rip it all down and re board it.
This is really your only option.
 
I'm no historian of buliding techniques, but I've been suprised when a property with lath walls doesn't have a lath cieling. I'm sure older guys than me would know the score.

My internal walls are all solid brick and concrete. It was a high end property when it was built with Crittal windows, wood strip floors etc...
 

ChrispyUK

Well-Known Member
Do you think the paper could still be removed? I’ve spoken to several plasterers today about scrapping the plaster off and starting again. None of them have been clear if this is possible, but I’m wondering if it’s more to do with them not wanting to do it. If it’s possible though, I would do it myself.

My thinking is there is a layer of thick paper between the new plaster and the old, so they can’t be bonded. Am I wrong here?

Yes and no. The answer is, know one knows. It could be stuck like s**t to a blanket, it could crack off and end up on the floor the next time the upstairs neighbours get jiggy with it.

If you fear it could end up on the floor (which I feel is your main worry) then the only option is to try stripping it to see if it comes off easily. If it does come away from the paper easily, then keep stripping back to the paper (carefully), then strip the paper off by hand by just perforating and soaking.

If it does seem well stuck, then, you've either got to get it re-skimmed or make good with filling and sanding.
 
Ive never plastered over paper ....even small bits left peel away.
If it hasnt come down yet take a paint scraper to it.
If its solid you should just paint it.
If your sat there worried about it ....rip it all down and re board it.
This is really your only option.

A couple of plasterers I’ve spoken ken to have said they are surprised it didn’t fall when the we’re doing it and as it didn’t, it may well stay attached. Is this true?

This was meant to be a small fix, and has turned in to s nightmare. My wife even said we didn’t need it done, but I thought as the floors were all ripped up and the flat a dusty mess it was worth doing. If we need to take it all down it will delay us moving back, add additional cost and cause a massive headache, all because someone I was paying to do a job, couldn’t be bothered to do it properly. I’m getting more annoyed the more I think about it.

If scraping it off is a realistic option I will happily do it.
 

paulf

Well-Known Member
Ive never plastered over paper ....even small bits left peel away.
If it hasnt come down yet take a paint scraper to it.
If its solid you should just paint it.
If your sat there worried about it ....rip it all down and re board it.
This is really your only option.
My internal walls are all solid brick and concrete. It was a high end property when it was built with Crittal windows, wood strip floors etc...
If your not happy and can't live with it your just going to have to bite the bullet and get it re-done. No fannying about make a decision.
 
Yes and no. The answer is, know one knows. It could be stuck like s**t to a blanket, it could crack off and end up on the floor the next time the upstairs neighbours get jiggy with it.

If you fear it could end up on the floor (which I feel is your main worry) then the only option is to try stripping it to see if it comes off easily. If it does come away from the paper easily, then keep stripping back to the paper (carefully), then strip the paper off by hand by just perforating and soaking.

If it does seem well stuck, then, you've either got to get it re-skimmed or make good with filling and sanding.

OK. The plasterer who did the survey said it was well bonded. With that in mind a skim to fix the finish issue could work then.
 

ChrispyUK

Well-Known Member
OK. The plasterer who did the survey said it was well bonded. With that in mind a skim to fix the finish issue could work then.

Yep, quicker than filling and sanding and less mess.

Whereabouts are you, there are loads of good guys and girls on here?
 

zombie

Private Member
This is just getting silly now!

The best option is underboard with a stop bead around perimeter done properley they look class.

All other options are just daft!

I also wouldnt give the plasterer time of day hes lost your respect and rightly so.

BUT JUST TO ADD THE SURVEY GUY IS ALSO MENTAL SAYING THAT THE BOND IS OK BLA BLA BLA. HES JUST HAD 40 QUID FOR NOTHING AND GIVEN STUPID ADVICE!

THREAD CLOSED, THANK YOU!!!!
 
This is just getting silly now!

The best option is underboard with a stop bead around perimeter done properley they look class.

All other options are just daft!

I also wouldnt give the plasterer time of day hes lost your respect and rightly so.

BUT JUST TO ADD THE SURVEY GUY IS ALSO MENTAL SAYING THAT THE BOND IS OK BLA BLA BLA. HES JUST HAD 40 QUID FOR NOTHING AND GIVEN STUPID ADVICE!

THREAD CLOSED, THANK YOU!!!!

Thanks, I’ll look in to the perimeter bead, thanks.
 

zombie

Private Member
Final comment is what everyone seems to be missing is that paper or no paper you should NEVER NEVER skim direct to old lat & lathe ceilings anyway.

Which has baffled me even more with your stupid survey man!
 
Final comment is what everyone seems to be missing is that paper or no paper you should NEVER NEVER skim direct to old lat & lathe ceilings anyway.

Which has baffled me even more with your stupid survey man!

It’s not lat&lathe it is plasterboard.
 
One last question. How about cutting the board out to the nearest joist so that the plaster cove remains supported and then re-board it to there? I get the stop bead but might look naff given the cove probably isn’t perfectly straight and a stop bead would only expose this.
 

beader

Private Member
You just don't smell right to me and my point has been all along if the work is bad the tradesman deserves the right to rectify and get paid
The plasterers in question have skimmed over paper, any tradesman worth his salt would know that this is not the correct way to do things and would of told the customer the best options ie overboard or more time to remove paper . Anyone who says that they could not get the paper off so skimmed it anyway need to hand in there tools at the nearest police station imo. You seem to be focused on the finish problem rather than the rel issue of skimming over lining paper.
 
D

Deleted member 29624

Guest
Your reliance on paint to determine the quality of plaster finish disturbs me.
Lol you know what I'm saying if it paints ok no problem....i definitely never said it was a good job just the blokes so should be given the opportunity to get paid
 
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