46sqm flat needs plastering in London NW6

FreeD

Private Member
If you going to use a backing coat why not use lime...sand/cement and hardwall are s**t...the amount of times I've been to 70s properties and there are areas of blown skim all over the walls and fine hairline cracks where there is a Hardwall backing coat...and sand/cement is always rushed and skimmed next day shrinkage cracks all over. This one has got dry line written all over it or lime if money is no concern.
 

superspread

Well-Known Member
If you going to use a backing coat why not use lime...sand/cement and hardwall are s**t...the amount of times I've been to 70s properties and there are areas of blown skim all over the walls and fine hairline cracks where there is a Hardwall backing coat...and sand/cement is always rushed and skimmed next day shrinkage cracks all over. This one has got dry line written all over it or lime if money is no concern.
Any of those backing coats can be used , s&c 1:6 mix is forgiving, I’ve never had agg with hardwall at all, don’t see y u couldn’t use bonding too?
 

FreeD

Private Member
Any of those backing coats can be used , s&c 1:6 mix is forgiving, I’ve never had agg with hardwall at all, don’t see y u couldn’t use bonding too?

Have you ever used clay? you can mix it with perlite/silver sand and hydrated lime. We have done a few jobs now on house like this with our own special mix spreads like butter and floats up perfectly.
 

essexandy

The Lake Governor
If you going to use a backing coat why not use lime...sand/cement and hardwall are s**t...the amount of times I've been to 70s properties and there are areas of blown skim all over the walls and fine hairline cracks where there is a Hardwall backing coat...and sand/cement is always rushed and skimmed next day shrinkage cracks all over. This one has got dry line written all over it or lime if money is no concern.
There wasn't any Hardwall in the seventies. Browning was quite different.
The fact that people don't use sand and cement correctly doesn't make it a bad material to use.
 

NW6 Renovation

New Member
I doubt if the person who's flat it is would have gone to all the trouble of gutting it just to slap a few dot and dabbed boards on it, the flats probably worth half a million quid.
Agreed. I'm not keen on pb but thought I should keep an open mind and see what the plasterers think. Seems like most would do it in some form of wet plastering. But if it is hardwall or some other product is still unclear.
 

NW6 Renovation

New Member
If you going to use a backing coat why not use lime...sand/cement and hardwall are s**t...the amount of times I've been to 70s properties and there are areas of blown skim all over the walls and fine hairline cracks where there is a Hardwall backing coat...and sand/cement is always rushed and skimmed next day shrinkage cracks all over. This one has got dry line written all over it or lime if money is no concern.
Yes, this is exactly what happened to the 1970's work that was done in areas where they had removed the old lime and plastered onto the brick. A very hard base coat and a skim. Cracks everywhere.
 

NW6 Renovation

New Member
Any of those backing coats can be used , s&c 1:6 mix is forgiving, I’ve never had agg with hardwall at all, don’t see y u couldn’t use bonding too?

There were only two bits of plaster that were still properly stuck to the walls in the whole flat
- some patches of what I guess were bonding from 1974 (brown/pink colour and a bit soft?)
- the remaining bits of wet applied cornices from 1900

Everything else was falling off: Old lime, hardwall (I think), some type of mortar mix also
... BUT, it looks like the walls were not cleaned before the patching was done and I think in '74 they laid onto a dusty crumbly layer of old lime. There didn't seem to be any key to the wall at all.
 

superspread

Well-Known Member
There were only two bits of plaster that were still properly stuck to the walls in the whole flat
- some patches of what I guess were bonding from 1974 (brown/pink colour and a bit soft?)
- the remaining bits of wet applied cornices from 1900

Everything else was falling off: Old lime, hardwall (I think), some type of mortar mix also
... BUT, it looks like the walls were not cleaned before the patching was done and I think in '74 they laid onto a dusty crumbly layer of old lime. There didn't seem to be any key to the wall at all.
Yes obviously the substrate needs to be clean and prepped properly before applying any plaster finish
 

FreeD

Private Member
It is a bad material to use for period properties it has caused all sorts of problems for years
Yes, this is exactly what happened to the 1970's work that was done in areas where they had removed the old lime and plastered onto the brick. A very hard base coat and a skim. Cracks everywhere.

Don't go with hardwall, bonding or sand/cement on a period property you will regret it. If it was my place I would dry line it just don't direct fix (plasterboard adhesive plasterboards to the external wall use battens first and if budget allows insulated plasterboards. Or if you want a solid backing coat hydraulic lime is an option with a putty finish.

The lads on here are on a windup.
 

ChrispyUK

Well-Known Member
It is a bad material to use for period properties it has caused all sorts of problems for years


Don't go with hardwall, bonding or sand/cement on a period property you will regret it. If it was my place I would dry line it just don't direct fix (plasterboard adhesive plasterboards to the external wall use battens first and if budget allows insulated plasterboards. Or if you want a solid backing coat hydraulic lime is an option with a putty finish.

The lads on here are on a windup.

Why would using hardwall on internal walls on a first floor flat cause problems?
 

FreeD

Private Member
Why would using hardwall on internal walls on a first floor flat cause problems?

It might not cause problems but it is more likely to than plasterboard...shrinkage cracks, movement cracks, thermal movement cracking...plus I hate the stuff had so many jobs that I've had to rectify with spider cracks all over it and blown areas here and there
 

superspread

Well-Known Member
It is a bad material to use for period properties it has caused all sorts of problems for years


Don't go with hardwall, bonding or sand/cement on a period property you will regret it. If it was my place I would dry line it just don't direct fix (plasterboard adhesive plasterboards to the external wall use battens first and if budget allows insulated plasterboards. Or if you want a solid backing coat hydraulic lime is an option with a putty finish.

The lads on here are on a windup.
I’m not on any wind up !!!

hardwall is perfect for this type of property

explain why not?

like I said earlier, I’d use bonding also! What problems that gonna cause 20ft off the ground??
 

superspread

Well-Known Member
It might not cause problems but it is more likely to than plasterboard...shrinkage cracks, movement cracks, thermal movement cracking...plus I hate the stuff had so many jobs that I've had to rectify with spider cracks all over it and blown areas here and there
So plasterboard won’t crack if the building moves??

ive never had a single call back on any hardwall or bonding I’ve floated, it’s got to be devil floated probably!!!
 

superspread

Well-Known Member
It is a bad material to use for period properties it has caused all sorts of problems for years


Don't go with hardwall, bonding or sand/cement on a period property you will regret it. If it was my place I would dry line it just don't direct fix (plasterboard adhesive plasterboards to the external wall use battens first and if budget allows insulated plasterboards. Or if you want a solid backing coat hydraulic lime is an option with a putty finish.

The lads on here are on a windup.
Agree with the lime !!
not necessarily hydraulic lime tho!!
 
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