Vandex disaster

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adapt

Active Member
You need to sign back in as cp1 before you can ask me that lol.

And to be honest I don't really need to explain my routine on how I do a report, I don't carry out surveys chartered surveyors do them.
And no I tend to accumulate all the evidence before deciding on the cause, that includes an external inspection.
 

Skimmy1

New Member
Read what I quoted, My dad is an architect, so I have been fortunate to learn building pathology from him which is something you can't buy or learn from a book. I also have the CSRT and CSSW, its not just a piece of paper. I say it again, I'm not a PCA member I just have the qualifications.
I only asked you to answer his question as you don't answer any
 
What started as a good thread quickly deteriorated into a whos got the biggest dick contest.
@pasty77 how did this turn out?...what did you do in the end.

IMO I would name the city/council who forced the work done initially, the builder ( even though you say hes good bloke ) and Vandex and create a lawsuit against them all....then sit back and let their insurances ( including your own home insurance ) fight it out.

the biggest concern here is your kids health.....breathing mold in, living in and around moldy conditions......it can be a killer.

as for fixing the problem, strip off the coating/vandex that was applied.....repair the chases done for electrical...can easy make them look like stone again then completely limewash the wall areas,or a complete insulated lime render system and install an air return system. ...PIV seems to be the UK answer
 
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adapt

Active Member
lol its condensation mate, control of humidity is what is needed, if I was him I would buy a dehumidifier and do what we all have recommended.

I have even seen damp proofing companies inject wall suffering from condensation lol.

Unless your actually on site then its hard to give a proper recommendation.

I have never seen lime used for tanking purposes, might be interesting to see how that turns out, makes sure your insured :RpS_thumbsup:
 

pasty77

New Member
What started as a good thread quickly deteriorated into a whos got the biggest dick contest.
@pasty77 how did this turn out?...what did you do in the end.

IMO I would name the city/council who forced the work done initially, the builder ( even though you say hes good bloke ) and Vandex and create a lawsuit against them all....then sit back and let their insurances ( including your own home insurance ) fight it out.

the biggest concern here is your kids health.....breathing mold in, living in and around moldy conditions......it can be a killer.

as for fixing the problem, strip off the coating/vandex that was applied.....repair the chases done for electrical...can easy make them look like stone again then completely limewash the wall areas,or a complete insulated lime render system and install an air return system. ...PIV seems to be the UK answer

Hi again, sorry for not getting back. I will point out again that I do take on all points made and appreciate that this is totally a condensation issue. Issue has been one of general skintness which has meant I haven't been able to do much. I did put a stud wall at the back of a downstairs room and that seems to have worked well. It was a quick bodge job with spare board that I had around and is just dry lined so in time I'll rip the boards off and insulate it properly. The main thing is that it seems to have solved the issue in the worst room. That particular room can be totally lined in time so that's what we'll do and get advice on what materials to use or re-read this thread. There are a few other places like in the back of cupboards which are slowly being modified using this method. I think upstairs I'm going to have to look at replacing with lime of some sort as you mention when money allows. Also will be looking at PIV systems to solve the core issue. In the meantime, the battle continues.

The problem we have is that we are squeezed in with 3 kids and keeping things off the wall in a 4m wide long barn is not so easy. We should be able to re-mortgage in 2017, can't now for various complicated issues with the planning permission on the conversion and the bank being contrary. So we'll then look to maybe put a couple caravans in the field over summer, move out for 6 weeks and get the whole thing done including PIV and solar PV with battery backup etc. I just feel we need to go back and start again for most of the house and we can't do that while living in it. Looks like another solid 2 weeks for me on the air chisel......ouch.
 

adapt

Active Member
Glad to hear your getting there, insulate and ventilate and I am sure it will come right at the end. make sure if you have any extractors that they are humidity controlled to about 60%
PIV is good but start with the extraction first as its cheapest, bathrooms and kitchen.

Good luck with it all I hope you get things sorted, not easy living in it and trying to do it at the same time you aint alone I see it all the time.(y)
 

tsavage

New Member
hi pasty, my thinking is u would never have had any problems if u had use lime plaster on the inside as old devon barns and devons weather =moisture in the walls, vandex acts as a moisture barrier but also doesnt allow moisture out!!!! I live in South devon and if u would like me to come and look , get in touch
 

pasty77

New Member
Cheers tsavage, have PM'd you.

I have been looking at these PIV systems. I can see that it works by pumping filtered air into the house and therefore displacing damp air. Question is, how damp is the air outside? I've measured the humidity in the house at around 70% in winter which is obviously way too high and hence our problem. But December here was awful. Would outside still be dryer than 70% on a warm and rainy day like we have had lately?
 

paddy5

Active Member
Cheers tsavage, have PM'd you.

I have been looking at these PIV systems. I can see that it works by pumping filtered air into the house and therefore displacing damp air. Question is, how damp is the air outside? I've measured the humidity in the house at around 70% in winter which is obviously way too high and hence our problem. But December here was awful. Would outside still be dryer than 70% on a warm and rainy day like we have had lately?
Warm air holds much more moisture than cold air, even during wettest winter humidity is low, for high humidity think warm heavy July nights. HRV works by using the the warm humid air from kitchens, laundry and bathrooms to warm the fresh outside air and pump into living area bedrooms etc. Very good for asthmatic kids etc.

Sent from my HUAWEI G6-L11 using Tapatalk
 
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