Newly boarded and skimmed ceiling cracking?

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EJB

New Member
Hi there, I am new to this forum but would be very grateful for some advice from fellow plasters. I have been in the building trade for about 20 years and in the last 10 years set up by myself and taken on a lot more plastering work. however, a few months ago a took down an old ceiling in a massive kitchen, moved a wall, re-boarded it with 9.5mm boards, skim taped it, screwed it up exactly the same as I always do and skimmed it. Then 3 months later it has started to crack and has come loose in places. The house owner is obviously not happy and has left threatening voicemail messages on my phone. He thinks the timber we screwed into wasn't thick enough and so he and the other builder I was working with have put in a lot more timber above and re-screwed, filled and repainted but it is still cracking. I really don't know why this is happening. I haven't done anything different to any other ceiling I have boarded and skimmed? I am going back today to try and work out why this is happening. It is a 80's built bungalow so there is nothing above the kitchen. My initial thought was that the thin factory made trusses they used in the roof maybe causing slight movement to the ceiling? The owner of the house is adamant that this is not caused by movement from above and is because we haven't screwed the boards up properly but I didn't do anything different to any other ceiling I have done. I really don't know why this is happening, can anyone help?
 

Nicm

Well-Known Member
Hi there, I am new to this forum but would be very grateful for some advice from fellow plasters. I have been in the building trade for about 20 years and in the last 10 years set up by myself and taken on a lot more plastering work. however, a few months ago a took down an old ceiling in a massive kitchen, moved a wall, re-boarded it with 9.5mm boards, skim taped it, screwed it up exactly the same as I always do and skimmed it. Then 3 months later it has started to crack and has come loose in places. The house owner is obviously not happy and has left threatening voicemail messages on my phone. He thinks the timber we screwed into wasn't thick enough and so he and the other builder I was working with have put in a lot more timber above and re-screwed, filled and repainted but it is still cracking. I really don't know why this is happening. I haven't done anything different to any other ceiling I have boarded and skimmed? I am going back today to try and work out why this is happening. It is a 80's built bungalow so there is nothing above the kitchen. My initial thought was that the thin factory made trusses they used in the roof maybe causing slight movement to the ceiling? The owner of the house is adamant that this is not caused by movement from above and is because we haven't screwed the boards up properly but I didn't do anything different to any other ceiling I have done. I really don't know why this is happening, can anyone help?
Did u stagger the joints?.
 
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tapit

Well-Known Member
To many variables to answer on here and we could guess the reasons all day long . But what i will say from your post is that you should not have used 9.5 mil boards for a start .
unless the trusses are at 400 centres!
 
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tapit

Well-Known Member
Hi there, I am new to this forum but would be very grateful for some advice from fellow plasters. I have been in the building trade for about 20 years and in the last 10 years set up by myself and taken on a lot more plastering work. however, a few months ago a took down an old ceiling in a massive kitchen, moved a wall, re-boarded it with 9.5mm boards, skim taped it, screwed it up exactly the same as I always do and skimmed it. Then 3 months later it has started to crack and has come loose in places. The house owner is obviously not happy and has left threatening voicemail messages on my phone. He thinks the timber we screwed into wasn't thick enough and so he and the other builder I was working with have put in a lot more timber above and re-screwed, filled and repainted but it is still cracking. I really don't know why this is happening. I haven't done anything different to any other ceiling I have boarded and skimmed? I am going back today to try and work out why this is happening. It is a 80's built bungalow so there is nothing above the kitchen. My initial thought was that the thin factory made trusses they used in the roof maybe causing slight movement to the ceiling? The owner of the house is adamant that this is not caused by movement from above and is because we haven't screwed the boards up properly but I didn't do anything different to any other ceiling I have done. I really don't know why this is happening, can anyone help?
put some pics up when you go back!
 

beader

Private Member
Not come across many 400 more like 600 in bungalows ,9.5 boards would sag over time with moisture , especially if boiling veg in kitchen
@EJB check for signs of someone been walking around up their , new light installation , aerial perhaps
Yes when your job goes pear shaped blame the sparks....... :D
 

tapit

Well-Known Member
Not come across many 400 more like 600 in bungalows ,9.5 boards would sag over time with moisture , especially if boiling veg in kitchen
@EJB check for signs of someone been walking around up their , new light installation , aerial perhaps
I know,. i am just pointing out that 9.5 mm are for 400c and 12.5 for 600c .
 

lurpak

Artex Boy
Red Leicester that @algeeman
5F9BABAB-6ED9-40E0-A2A0-C73416C3BCBC.jpeg
 

Robbo123

Well-Known Member
Usually the exact opposite, only a confident knowledgeable spread would know when to use 9.5mm
There's genuinely no reason to ever use 9.5mm unless you want the board to bend easier to the shape of an old ceiling in a cottage or something. it costs almost exactly the same as 12.5mm and isn't anywhere near as strong.
With regards to the post only thing I can think of is you screwed the screws in to far on some of the joists if the board was actually coming away
 

John j

Mono Don
There's genuinely no reason to ever use 9.5mm unless you want the board to bend easier to the shape of an old ceiling in a cottage or something. it costs almost exactly the same as 12.5mm and isn't anywhere near as strong.
With regards to the post only thing I can think of is you screwed the screws in to far on some of the joists if the board was actually coming away
Can come in handy on reveals.
 

tapit

Well-Known Member
There's genuinely no reason to ever use 9.5mm unless you want the board to bend easier to the shape of an old ceiling in a cottage or something. it costs almost exactly the same as 12.5mm and isn't anywhere near as strong.
With regards to the post only thing I can think of is you screwed the screws in to far on some of the joists if the board was actually coming away
why is it still made?
 

lurpak

Artex Boy
If it cracked it’s fuckall to do with it being 9.5mm board. Do you think an extra 3mm of board would prevent it.

All you need to know is when it cracked. First few days, dried too fast. Anything else is movement in joists.

That’s assuming it was boarded correctly
 
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