Lime pointing

#1
I think it was @vfr12 who mentioned the benefits of pre-mixed bagged lime products. As in if you don't know exactly what you're doing with the mix, leave it to the experts. I'm familiar enough with lime mortars to know how little I know about the mixes. We needed a mix with a pink tint to the sand, and a coarse aggregate so that it matched the original Meriden sand as closely as possible. I got the lime putty mix in 25 kg bags for ease of handling from Lime Base I re-used the original 16th century bricks and IMNSHO it looks the nuts.

The moral of this storey is, if you're not 100% on mixes and ratios for lime work, buy it from someone who is. (y)

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#3
What a lovely job to be on (y)
Yeah, it's nice work, going well, everyone's in a good mood and the customer's spot on. Every time the committee chairman comes over he asks if I want money! Which makes a nice change from the w4nkers you ave to keep reminding. They were having Grannygasms when they saw 'Lee's heritage lime plastering' I thought maybe you'd made the trip down to offer guidance. :X3:
 
#4
Yeah, it's nice work, going well, everyone's in a good mood and the customer's spot on. Every time the committee chairman comes over he asks if I want money! Which makes a nice change from the w4nkers you ave to keep reminding. They were having Grannygasms when they saw 'Lee's heritage lime plastering' I thought maybe you'd made the trip down to offer guidance. :X3:
I was about to but then I just read the back of the bag to him on the phone and reassured him “you got this!” when he had a bit of a wobble. After drying his eyes he seems to have done a good job.... I’m so proud I put a picture of it on my fridge!

Sounds ideal! I’m liking the regular updates (y)
 
#5
I think it was @vfr12 who mentioned the benefits of pre-mixed bagged lime products. As in if you don't know exactly what you're doing with the mix, leave it to the experts. I'm familiar enough with lime mortars to know how little I know about the mixes. We needed a mix with a pink tint to the sand, and a coarse aggregate so that it matched the original Meriden sand as closely as possible. I got the lime putty mix in 25 kg bags for ease of handling from Lime Base I re-used the original 16th century bricks and IMNSHO it looks the nuts.

The moral of this storey is, if you're not 100% on mixes and ratios for lime work, buy it from someone who is. (y)

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Y don't you use red sand whith sharp sand hydrolic lime in it goes compact in scrape next day whith small tool
 
#6
I’m liking the regular updates (y)
Well here's an interesting snippet then. When we started stripping out the rotten oak, we spotted this.
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A bit closer and you can see the key.

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Obviously deliberately hung on that nail inside the original joint. So that's been in there for at least 300 years. There's a storey to be told with that, but sadly I doubt we'll ever know it.
 
#7
Well here's an interesting snippet then. When we started stripping out the rotten oak, we spotted this.
View attachment 27236

A bit closer and you can see the key.

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Obviously deliberately hung on that nail inside the original joint. So that's been in there for at least 300 years. There's a storey to be told with that, but sadly I doubt we'll ever know it.
I hope you put it on a chain and now wear it as a talisman!

That’s awesome, love stuff like that
 
#8
I hope you put it on a chain and now wear it as a talisman!

That’s awesome, love stuff like that
No, I gave the photo's and key to the woman that's on the committee who's also in the village historical society. Stuff like that can be quite important/interesting historically. It may just be a good luck thing, but way back in the mists of time the cottage was occupied by the midwife. Keys were often used by Jewish midwives as a talisman to ensure a healthy birth. I told her that, and about witch (apotropaic) symbols etc. She was quite chuffed and no doubt there will be a meeting or two held about it :LOL:

I suggested that we should probably put it back into the building's frame and record where it went.
 
#9
Y don't you use red sand whith sharp sand hydrolic lime in it goes compact in scrape next day whith small tool
It's very difficult to get clean sand for lime mortar now, certainly from builder's merchants. Plus there's the issue of getting it consistent enough to satisfy the conservation officer, plus the time taken to do it. So at £8:00 a bag it's quicker, easier, cheaper and more consistent to buy it all done. (y)
 
#10
Well here's an interesting snippet then. When we started stripping out the rotten oak, we spotted this.
View attachment 27236

A bit closer and you can see the key.

View attachment 27238

Obviously deliberately hung on that nail inside the original joint. So that's been in there for at least 300 years. There's a storey to be told with that, but sadly I doubt we'll ever know it.
Can i borrow it to see if it fits my missus chastity belt?
 
#11
It's very difficult to get clean sand for lime mortar now, certainly from builder's merchants. Plus there's the issue of getting it consistent enough to satisfy the conservation officer, plus the time taken to do it. So at £8:00 a bag it's quicker, easier, cheaper and more consistent to buy it all done. (y)
I use to scrape it out next day is that the way you do it?
 
#12
No, I gave the photo's and key to the woman that's on the committee who's also in the village historical society. Stuff like that can be quite important/interesting historically. It may just be a good luck thing, but way back in the mists of time the cottage was occupied by the midwife. Keys were often used by Jewish midwives as a talisman to ensure a healthy birth. I told her that, and about witch (apotropaic) symbols etc. She was quite chuffed and no doubt there will be a meeting or two held about it :LOL:

I suggested that we should probably put it back into the building's frame and record where it went.
See, knew it was a talisman! Must have a bit of witch in me! Huggaddy buggaddy!!
 
#13
I use to scrape it out next day is that the way you do it?
I use a wire brush either at the end of the day or the next day, a quick rub over the joints cleans up the edges well and brings out the aggregate. Makes new morttar look older and more weathered which is fine for work like this. If it's new mortar to look like new then I scrape it back with a trowel or leaf and go over it with a soft brush.
 
#20
Well here's an interesting snippet then. When we started stripping out the rotten oak, we spotted this.
View attachment 27236

A bit closer and you can see the key.

View attachment 27238

Obviously deliberately hung on that nail inside the original joint. So that's been in there for at least 300 years. There's a storey to be told with that, but sadly I doubt we'll ever know it.
Not as good as finding a 1970s porn mag when you rip an old ceiling down!!!

Ahhhh the good old days when growlers were growlers!!!!
 
#21
Looks great did he enjoy using it
Looks like he made a great job with it
He kept wittering on about creamy this, light that, whanging on about coverage. Platerery terms that I'm probably in trouble for overhearing, but sounded positive.

He did make a nice job of it. P1ss taking aside (and there's a lot of that) he's good at his job. (y)

We're not that far from you, so if you get chance pop over for a nosey. You can even have a brew in one of the new mugs. :coffe:
 
#23
He kept wittering on about creamy this, light that, whanging on about coverage. Platerery terms that I'm probably in trouble for overhearing, but sounded positive.

He did make a nice job of it. P1ss taking aside (and there's a lot of that) he's good at his job. (y)

We're not that far from you, so if you get chance pop over for a nosey. You can even have a brew in one of the new mugs. :coffe:
Will he get ice cream? :rebotando:
 
#26
Oh well, now I know there’s are many reds in the country . :rolleyes:. Did your heritage master plaster winished with stiff brush? I do it this way and straight over with soft one to expose the stones. Haven’t seen or heard anyone else to do it apart from @Nisus :X3:
@Nisus is interior finishes as he doesn't like exposure to the sun, draughts, being cold, pollen or insects. :LOL:

I did the outside.
 
#30
It's very difficult to get clean sand for lime mortar now, certainly from builder's merchants. Plus there's the issue of getting it consistent enough to satisfy the conservation officer, plus the time taken to do it. So at £8:00 a bag it's quicker, easier, cheaper and more consistent to buy it all done. (y)
forget clean sand it can cause failiers mix is 5to 2
 

vfr12

Well-Known Member
#32
I use a wire brush either at the end of the day or the next day, a quick rub over the joints cleans up the edges well and brings out the aggregate. Makes new morttar look older and more weathered which is fine for work like this. If it's new mortar to look like new then I scrape it back with a trowel or leaf and go over it with a soft brush.
You rub it or you compress it?
 

vfr12

Well-Known Member
#34
mix it as dry as possible point in with pointing iron pressing hard in flush to face go back back later in day knock back with a churn brush but dont'knock back beyond face of brick or stone don't expect to see stone in mix this will show after weathering
That wasn't addressed to you Norman!
I was curious how clean sand can lead to failure?