Would 1 coat be ok?



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#1
Hi all,

I am a DIY plasterer and yesterday I did my first ceiling in 6 years for a relative. It's about 12 by 12 foot. Unfortunately it's come out rougher than I would have liked, mainly because light was fading fast so I had trouble wet and dry trowelling to finish it. Im thinking about doing it again but earlier this time and just wondered if 1 coat would be enough? I originally did 2 coats on to new plasterboard so I think I can get away with just 1 coat.

Thanks for reading
 

Vincey

Private Member
#2
I’d just sand it now tbh and put it down to experience, skimming over plaster again will be nighttime
 

lurpak

Active Member
#5
Skimming plasterboard is the easiest part of plastering. I could teach my toddler to do it. So If you fluffed it on board, it will be even worse on pva.

Not knocking you, it was likely to big of an area for your skill level.

As said above. If it isn’t a complete monstrosity you’re better off trying to sand and fill it
 
#6
Thanks for the replies

The poor result was really down to poor lighting. I've done ceilings before they've come out ok. I did a 3 week plastering course so Im not doing it from watching Youtube videos.

Is there a reason why a single skim on top would not be a good idea? I think i'd rather do 2 coats again than sand it.
 

lurpak

Active Member
#8
Thanks for the replies

The poor result was really down to poor lighting. I've done ceilings before they've come out ok. I did a 3 week plastering course so Im not doing it from watching Youtube videos.

Is there a reason why a single skim on top would not be a good idea? I think i'd rather do 2 coats again than sand it.
Just get a plasterer in. And if you’re really interested in learning then watch him work (if he is open to that) you will learn more just watching a proper spread in person than a course.

Watch everything, the order he does things in. He will sheet up and pva the ceilings. Then get everything ready. He’ll then go looking for dirty panties to kill some time. He’ll come back in 30 mins and skim the ceiling for you.
 
#10
Just get a plasterer in. And if you’re really interested in learning then watch him work (if he is open to that) you will learn more just watching a proper spread in person than a course.

Watch everything, the order he does things in. He will sheet up and pva the ceilings. Then get everything ready. He’ll then go looking for dirty panties to kill some time. He’ll come back in 30 mins and skim the ceiling for you.
I use to work as a labourer for plasterers so I've done all that.

I can plaster, not as good as a pro but Im alright. This is the first ceiling I've done that hasn't gone to plan.

I just wonder why some seem to be against a single skim.
 
#11
I use to work as a labourer for plasterers so I've done all that.

I can plaster, not as good as a pro but Im alright. This is the first ceiling I've done that hasn't gone to plan.

I just wonder why some seem to be against a single skim.
Because it’s not the proper way to do it, let it go right off get your self a sanding pole and some sand papers for it and rub it down if you let it go light pink before rubbing it down it will flatten out easily
 

Lodan

Private Member
#13
If you f**k*d up two coats on plasterboard do you honestly think 1 coat on bare skim (lot of suction) is going to go better.....I definitely dont
 

zombie

Private Member
#15
This my friend is why you will never be a plasterer...

It's not because you have only done a 3 week Mickey mouse course or because you used to be a labourer...

It's because you simply don't care you f**k*d up once yet are wantinhg to take short cuts again!!!

Takes a lot of experience and know how to determine when a short cut can be taken without detrement to the job and you my friend have neither!!!
 
#16
One coat not a chance the suction will kill it stone dead. Your lack of experience is something that should be at the forefront of your mind.
 
#17
This my friend is why you will never be a plasterer...

It's not because you have only done a 3 week Mickey mouse course or because you used to be a labourer...

It's because you simply don't care you f**k*d up once yet are wantinhg to take short cuts again!!!

Takes a lot of experience and know how to determine when a short cut can be taken without detrement to the job and you my friend have neither!!!

It was an nvq level 2 course taught by profressional plasterers.

I don't want to be a professional plasterer, just a good DIY one, which i am, despite one bad ceiling. Even the pros have bad days.

I don't want to take a short cut, I am asking if I can take one. I am happy to do two coats again, it's more experience, but if one coat is all that is necessary then I'd obviously prefer that.

And yes, i don't have many years of experience, that's why im asking you guys. Your advice is appreciated because you do have the experience.
 
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t33ch

Active Member
#18
Come on guys, no need to get so harsh. We're here to educate and enlighten so...

@cupoftea, your plan sounds fine. Just stick a single coat on over what you've done already.

I guarantee you will come out of it a wiser man.

:rolleyes:
 
#20
Come on guys, no need to get so harsh. We're here to educate and enlighten so...

@cupoftea, your plan sounds fine. Just stick a single coat on over what you've done already.

I guarantee you will come out of it a wiser man.

:rolleyes:
Well the overall message seems to be one coat won't work, so i'll either sand or redo it. It's not that bad, the main problems is the lines left from when I did the wet troweling to finish it off. because it was dark i didn't manage to get them out.
 

zombie

Private Member
#23
It was an nvq level 2 course taught by profressional plasterers.

I don't want to be a professional plasterer, just a good DIY one, which i am, despite one bad ceiling. Even the pros have bad days.

I don't want to take a short cut, I am asking if I can take one. I am happy to do two coats again, it's more experience, but if one coat is all that is necessary then I'd obviously prefer that.

And yes, i don't have many years of experience, that's why im asking you guys. Your advice is appreciated because you do have the experience.
That paperwork ain't worth wiping yer arse on pal
 
#24
Well the overall message seems to be one coat won't work, so i'll either sand or redo it. It's not that bad, the main problems is the lines left from when I did the wet troweling to finish it off. because it was dark i didn't manage to get them out.
How long did it take for start to finish and at what point did you realise it couldn't be finished properly.
 
#26
How long did it take for start to finish and at what point did you realise it couldn't be finished properly.
Think it took about 4 hours. I made the mix wetter than normal because it's a flat roof and last time I did one of them it dried very quickly, so this one took a bit longer than normal and by the time it came to wet trowelling it was getting dark, too dark to see small marks that stick out like a sore thumb in daylight.

It was a good a course, we did a ceiling and wall every day, plus a bit of rendering.
 
#27
Think it took about 4 hours. I made the mix wetter than normal because it's a flat roof and last time I did one of them it dried very quickly, so this one took a bit longer than normal and by the time it came to wet trowelling it was getting dark, too dark to see small marks that stick out like a sore thumb in daylight.

It was a good a course, we did a ceiling and wall every day, plus a bit of rendering.
4 hours on 13m2 is excessive even including setting up and prep.
 

Dropsalot

Private Member
#28
Right is right. Everything that is an alternative is therefore not right........
It is however up to you. You say you are not satisfied, people on here have told you the best way to get the right result, take the advice or don’t. Do it again or don’t. Lower your expectations or don’t.
Best of luck anyway.
 

t33ch

Active Member
#29
Think it took about 4 hours. ... so this one took a bit longer than normal ...
It was a good a course....
You were trying to trowel set plaster. That's a loooooonnngggggggg time to be working at a relatively small ceiling.

No matter how good the course, you're being given a bit of a hard time on here because you're claiming plastering knowledge whilst asking a question that (IMO) is the sort of thing a clueless client might ask when discussing the job.
Even a little experience should have taught you that skimming onto an set skim coat is fraught with difficulties.
 
#30
You were trying to trowel set plaster. That's a loooooonnngggggggg time to be working at a relatively small ceiling.

No matter how good the course, you're being given a bit of a hard time on here because you're claiming plastering knowledge whilst asking a question that (IMO) is the sort of thing a clueless client might ask when discussing the job.
Even a little experience should have taught you that skimming onto an set skim coat is fraught with difficulties.

It took ages to set, i think because it was a cool day and it was quite a wet mix.

I've done a lot of research online. Some plasterers say it's ok; some say it's not. I've never been in this situtaion so surely the best way to learn is to ask other plasterers what they would do? Isn't that what fourms are for? better than me trying something that is likely to fail, wasting more time and money.

I've taken people's advice and won't be doing a single skim. I thought it was risky, I just wanted to have that fear validated by professional plasterers on here.

I plastered a wall in the same house today and I am very pleased with the result.
 

tcd

Active Member
#31
Scrape or sand the lines out, pva leave to dry, pva again leave to dry, mix up your multi the way you were taught, skim the ceiling, flatten out, the way you were taught, give it a check every 5 mins ,when ready second coat flatten out again, check it every 5 mins to see how its pulling in and trowel accordingly, the way you were taught, try and think back to when your instructor gave advice when you are plastering , your confidence will return when you tackle it again,
 

Danny

Administrator
#32
Plaster has a chemical set so max you get is 45mins and if there is suction then it is less...

An experienced plasterer can get over anything :D A newby will struggle with plasterboard...
 
#35
Scrape or sand the lines out, pva leave to dry, pva again leave to dry, mix up your multi the way you were taught, skim the ceiling, flatten out, the way you were taught, give it a check every 5 mins ,when ready second coat flatten out again, check it every 5 mins to see how its pulling in and trowel accordingly, the way you were taught, try and think back to when your instructor gave advice when you are plastering , your confidence will return when you tackle it again,

Thanks TCD