Victorian House Rendered with cement

Spadez88

New Member
Hi,

currently my house has been rendered with cement and this is in poor condition with cracks and blowouts. I am looking to get it re-rendered. I’ve had a few people come to quote and all have quoted for cement.

From what I am reading, given it’s a mid Victorian house, I should be going for lime. This raises a few questions:

1. How do I know if lime is the way to go?
2. If it is, do I use 3.5 lime?
3. Can a normal renderer use lime or do I HAVE to get a specialist in.
4. Are there any modern versions of lime rendering that are better?

Thank you
 

The Hobo

Well-Known Member
Hi,

currently my house has been rendered with cement and this is in poor condition with cracks and blowouts. I am looking to get it re-rendered. I’ve had a few people come to quote and all have quoted for cement.

From what I am reading, given it’s a mid Victorian house, I should be going for lime. This raises a few questions:

1. How do I know if lime is the way to go?
2. If it is, do I use 3.5 lime?
3. Can a normal renderer use lime or do I HAVE to get a specialist in.
4. Are there any modern versions of lime rendering that are better?

Thank you
is it built with stone or brick
 

Spadez88

New Member
It’s bath stone on the front of the house. I’m not sure on the back because it’s covered with render. Here is a pic if that helps to get a sense of the type of house
2ADBC2D8-BD45-4BC8-8650-E7002956C10B.jpeg
 

Spadez88

New Member
Thank you both for the reply. It’s a terrace house. The lowest point in the roof is the half way point of my property, if that makes sense.
 

malc

TPF Special Forces
not a simple job. lime would be expensive.
i would have the render repaired then painted. there looks like a lot of air pollution in the area with the colour of that tyrollean finish.
 

martinemj

Well-Known Member
You could go with a modern bagged lime render (coloured)
This will contain
Sand/Lime /Small amount of cement which will aid set and Will also be breathable

It's best if you find someone who has used the material before ..

Mono St astier or prb belle epoque would be ideal
 

The Hobo

Well-Known Member
not a simple job. lime would be expensive.
i would have the render repaired then painted. there looks like a lot of air pollution in the area with the colour of that tyrollean finish.
a long reach hymac would sort it what a ugly building that is more like an industrial unit
 

The Hobo

Well-Known Member
Hi,

currently my house has been rendered with cement and this is in poor condition with cracks and blowouts. I am looking to get it re-rendered. I’ve had a few people come to quote and all have quoted for cement.

From what I am reading, given it’s a mid Victorian house, I should be going for lime. This raises a few questions:

1. How do I know if lime is the way to go?
2. If it is, do I use 3.5 lime?
3. Can a normal renderer use lime or do I HAVE to get a specialist in.
4. Are there any modern versions of lime rendering that are better?

Thank you
having seen it its brick built if it was mine I would patch it paint then forget it /spend the money on the interior
 

Spadez88

New Member
Thank you for the reply. I guess a few questions come up

1. Hobo It’s bath stone on the front how do I know if it’s brick built on the back, as it’s all covered by render and none of the other houses seem to give it away. If it is brick as opposed to stone as you saying it would be better to repair? The cracks aren't enough of a concern?

2. Lox You mentioned I only need lime if its required by the council but I was under the impression lime should be used regardless. Is thinking like krend really that breathable for example?

3. Martin The person I had in mind hasn’t used lime before and was suggesting add a little lime to a cement mix. Is it really going to be that difficult for him to to sue a modern lime render mix? From what I can see on those prices I need about 2 tonnes which would exceed £1k in materials alone, ack.
 

bof

Well-Known Member
As mentioned , it's ugly, even with new render the pipework doesn't help

Paint then trellis and ivy
 

Spadez88

New Member
With the greatest appreciation in the world I didn’t come to a plastering forum for fashion tips from you guys I want to know the technicalities on getting this place lifted.
 
  • Funny
Reactions: bof

martinemj

Well-Known Member
He would probably add some hydrated lime ..which will make it more workable rather than add breathability

We use bagged renders because we mix/apply by render pump and find the mix more consistent

You didn't ask for the cheapest solution and it comes down to what sort of job you want
 

FreeD

Private Member
Thank you for the reply. I guess a few questions come up

1. Hobo It’s bath stone on the front how do I know if it’s brick built on the back, as it’s all covered by render and none of the other houses seem to give it away. If it is brick as opposed to stone as you saying it would be better to repair? The cracks aren't enough of a concern?

2. Lox You mentioned I only need lime if its required by the council but I was under the impression lime should be used regardless. Is thinking like krend really that breathable for example?

3. Martin The person I had in mind hasn’t used lime before and was suggesting add a little lime to a cement mix. Is it really going to be that difficult for him to to sue a modern lime render mix? From what I can see on those prices I need about 2 tonnes which would exceed £1k in materials alone, ack.
If he hasn't used lime he is not a plasterer/renderer and high risk are you going for the cheapest? modern cement renders e.g weber pral m are water vapour permeable so they do not trap water like a site mixed render might but they are not as breathable and flexible as a lime render (no cement)

1K is nothing for materials...

This is a very straight forward job for a experienced renderer...the best solution would be if sound go over with fully meshed parinter...followed by 1.5mm top coat.

If not sound then remove all, Fassa SP22 - Fassa KI7 - Fassa 1.5mm top coat.

Budget around 15-18K including mats, scaffold and waste removal labour and materials.
 
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