Vertical damp patch on brick - No one knows what it is!

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Tom81

Well-Known Member
The tiles on the roof and the slabs look a lot older than 2 years, my roof is the same age and looks like the day it was done
 

Toilet-Duck

New Member
Just an update to this, had a builder remove a few bricks to inspect cavity and this does appear to be dry as is the fibreglass insulation

I'm guessing this means the brick could be stained or could it still be condensation still?

Complete mystery to both myself and the builder.

Defo’ think sparky in fitting the outside socked box has displaced cavity/wall insulation causing cold bridging- condensation. I would remove a brick or two at top and bottom of damp patch and try and reinstate insulation, ( if that is in fact the problem).
I'm guessing if it was condensation there should be some sort of dampness on the insulation? Had a brick out this morning to investigate further and it was dry
 

Stevieo

Royal Spin Doctor
Just an update to this, had a builder remove a few bricks to inspect cavity and this does appear to be dry as is the fibreglass insulation

I'm guessing this means the brick could be stained or could it still be condensation still?

Complete mystery to both myself and the builder.



I'm guessing if it was condensation there should be some sort of dampness on the insulation? Had a brick out this morning to investigate further and it was dry

You have checked that it actually damp before you got the kango out, haven't you?

See, that 'stain' follows the brickwork perfectly and wouldn't have thought that any dampening process would be likely to do that.

It could be some sort of repair or alteration or some sort of treatment applied to the wall...say, by someone who installed that socket. Perhaps he was concerned about the wires behind it and varnished the f**k*r.

You never know.
 

JML

Member
Just an update to this, had a builder remove a few bricks to inspect cavity and this does appear to be dry as is the fibreglass insulation

I'm guessing this means the brick could be stained or could it still be condensation still?

Complete mystery to both myself and the builder.



I'm guessing if it was condensation there should be some sort of dampness on the insulation? Had a brick out this morning to investigate further and it was dry
Aye it’s a bit of a mystery right enough, if it interstitial condensation, ( condensation forming within the wall structure, l don’t think there would be any evidence on the insulation it would be forming on the cold outside leaf of the cavity wall and be absorbed by the brick.
 

The Hobo

Well-Known Member
Just wondering if anyone can give me some advice as I'm at a real loss.

I recently purchased a property back in April (new build built back in 2016 but only recently bought by myself) and have been moving in and ordering various furniture.

Back in July (when we had a large downpour) I noticed a large watermark suddnly appear down the side of the back of the propety in one area.

Had a roofer out who fully checked the roof and guttering was advised that the gutter was completely blocked and required realigning. This was unblocked, realigned and extra clips added to guttering. Was advised to wait a few weeks and that the wall should dry out.

Roll on a few weeks and the wall wasn't drying out (was exactly the same) had a builder out and he advised that it could be the electrical socket causing damp due to being drilled through instead of being sealed.

I've had a electricican out and was advised that it was simply drilled straight through without any sealent added. He sealed the hole but did advise he didn't think it would cause the issue.

Roll on a few months and the water mark still hasn't disappeared (it's exactly the same from July) I'm at a total loss on what I should do now.

I had a further roofer out who advised there was a small hairline crack but that would not cause the issue (had it replaced anyway) but had no effect.

There doesn't appear to be any damp coming through on the inside, it still smells brand new and there isn't any bubbling on the inside.

Does anyone have any idea on what could be causing this and what sort of tradesmen I require to properly diagnose the issue, everyone one I have had out so far has no clue on what could be causing this.

Could the wall simply have a water stain or is it something more serious?

Thanks in advance
is that a gas flue stiking out if so the heat from it coud be drawing the moisture from the clay brick to it
 
Just one idea to look into.......top lift brick work is not the best so what else is not? You can see week hole vents in the brick work so it would suggest it has a cavity tray on the lintel but one end may not be turned up allowing water to flow out. The water penetrates the pourus bricks............ Just a thought
 

Brimstone

Member
You need a proper RICS Building Surveyor really but;
1st things first is it actually damp ?- buy a £25 quid moisture meter and use it all over the place inside and out. It'll also tell you if its drying/getting wetter. If it does not change then you have a continuous water source somewhere as it is evaporating outside all the while. e.g. a leaky pipe, but-
Check valley flashings, - Left hand side mortar looks ropey & if the vally is blocked either side and/or some mortaring is missing then water goes underneath and runs down the fabric membrane, which should end up over the gutter but often doesnt.
Also, any membrane holes will let it run down the underside and into the cavity
Unless the meter says otherwise, it looks as if the moisture starts where the last lift commences = bridged cavity
almost a cert.
Where is the water coming from?
- big roof area being shovelled down a small area can penetrate the overlap of the tiles, its not central but then the bigger valley will push the flow over that much.
- the radiator position looks sus and on the right level, and its in the wall not going thru the floor.
My best guess is the radiator pipe is leaking behind the plaster board, soaking the wall not the board, and crossing the cavity. It's the end of a run, maybe they ran the pipes vertically downstairs and/or in the cavity.

The number of times I've been accused of poking my chimney thru places and being respoinsible, I get used to this. Had one last night - loose downpipe joints overflowing and landing on my flue pipe then running down it into inside - but fair play, I had a gap in my external mastic seal.
 

tapit

Well-Known Member
You need a proper RICS Building Surveyor really but;
1st things first is it actually damp ?- buy a £25 quid moisture meter and use it all over the place inside and out. It'll also tell you if its drying/getting wetter. If it does not change then you have a continuous water source somewhere as it is evaporating outside all the while. e.g. a leaky pipe, but-
Check valley flashings, - Left hand side mortar looks ropey & if the vally is blocked either side and/or some mortaring is missing then water goes underneath and runs down the fabric membrane, which should end up over the gutter but often doesnt.
Also, any membrane holes will let it run down the underside and into the cavity
Unless the meter says otherwise, it looks as if the moisture starts where the last lift commences = bridged cavity
almost a cert.
Where is the water coming from?
- big roof area being shovelled down a small area can penetrate the overlap of the tiles, its not central but then the bigger valley will push the flow over that much.
- the radiator position looks sus and on the right level, and its in the wall not going thru the floor.
My best guess is the radiator pipe is leaking behind the plaster board, soaking the wall not the board, and crossing the cavity. It's the end of a run, maybe they ran the pipes vertically downstairs and/or in the cavity.

The number of times I've been accused of poking my chimney thru places and being respoinsible, I get used to this. Had one last night - loose downpipe joints overflowing and landing on my flue pipe then running down it into inside - but fair play, I had a gap in my external mastic seal.
rough f**k*r
 
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