Hi new member

ChrispyUK

Well-Known Member
Welcome

D9435892-BE33-4EE6-BA4E-03BF43D3DD97.gif
 

Blueplanet

New Member
Hi thanks for the messages above.

OK, so I have never done any rendering. However, I am happy to do tasks around the house and have recently painted (after removing old paint) the 30 metres of render around my house. I repaired minor bits of damage such as bits of render fallen off at the bottom corners - using masonary filler such as Toupret F filler.

The one-piece that I have left is where the render is cracked. Whoever, repaired and rendered it before removed the stop and angle beads. Therefore it is blown out and cracked (photo to follow). It is roughly 3 sqm in total. The original is sand and cement from 1985.

I got several quotes and was quote around £1300 for it so I thought I would give it a go and save some cash which is hard to come by at the moment as I am not working due Covid 19.

I was thinking of using Tarmac One Coat Render from Wickes or B&Q as it saves me the hassle of mixing sand and cement and I can just add water etc. I was also going to use stainless steel beads - given the small area I am not too worried about them costing a little more.

Looking at some videos I was thinking of using an angle grinder to remove the old render - which I think maybe the hardest part. Then I need to attach the angle and stop beads. I read I can use the render to attach the angle beads and some adhesive for the stop beads (using a spirit level to ensure they are straight).

After that put the render mix on the walls and use a straight edge (a piece of wood) to make sure it's all flat. And finally use a wet sponge float to create a slightly non smooth look - the rest of the house is flat but not smooth looking - if you get what I mean. Any comments/suggestions would be highly appreciated. Thanks
 

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smoother09

Well-Known Member
Hi thanks for the messages above.

OK, so I have never done any rendering. However, I am happy to do tasks around the house and have recently painted (after removing old paint) the 30 metres of render around my house. I repaired minor bits of damage such as bits of render fallen off at the bottom corners - using masonary filler such as Toupret F filler.

The one-piece that I have left is where the render is cracked. Whoever, repaired and rendered it before removed the stop and angle beads. Therefore it is blown out and cracked (photo to follow). It is roughly 3 sqm in total. The original is sand and cement from 1985.

I got several quotes and was quote around £1300 for it so I thought I would give it a go and save some cash which is hard to come by at the moment as I am not working due Covid 19.

I was thinking of using Tarmac One Coat Render from Wickes or B&Q as it saves me the hassle of mixing sand and cement and I can just add water etc. I was also going to use stainless steel beads - given the small area I am not too worried about them costing a little more.

Looking at some videos I was thinking of using an angle grinder to remove the old render - which I think maybe the hardest part. Then I need to attach the angle and stop beads. I read I can use the render to attach the angle beads and some adhesive for the stop beads (using a spirit level to ensure they are straight).

After that put the render mix on the walls and use a straight edge (a piece of wood) to make sure it's all flat. And finally use a wet sponge float to create a slightly non smooth look - the rest of the house is flat but not smooth looking - if you get what I mean. Any comments/suggestions would be highly appreciated. Thanks
Yeah that’s really s**t think I’ll have a go at neurosurgery later cos of covid n all that!
 

tapit

Well-Known Member
Hi thanks for the messages above.

OK, so I have never done any rendering. However, I am happy to do tasks around the house and have recently painted (after removing old paint) the 30 metres of render around my house. I repaired minor bits of damage such as bits of render fallen off at the bottom corners - using masonary filler such as Toupret F filler.

The one-piece that I have left is where the render is cracked. Whoever, repaired and rendered it before removed the stop and angle beads. Therefore it is blown out and cracked (photo to follow). It is roughly 3 sqm in total. The original is sand and cement from 1985.

I got several quotes and was quote around £1300 for it so I thought I would give it a go and save some cash which is hard to come by at the moment as I am not working due Covid 19.

I was thinking of using Tarmac One Coat Render from Wickes or B&Q as it saves me the hassle of mixing sand and cement and I can just add water etc. I was also going to use stainless steel beads - given the small area I am not too worried about them costing a little more.

Looking at some videos I was thinking of using an angle grinder to remove the old render - which I think maybe the hardest part. Then I need to attach the angle and stop beads. I read I can use the render to attach the angle beads and some adhesive for the stop beads (using a spirit level to ensure they are straight).

After that put the render mix on the walls and use a straight edge (a piece of wood) to make sure it's all flat. And finally use a wet sponge float to create a slightly non smooth look - the rest of the house is flat but not smooth looking - if you get what I mean. Any comments/suggestions would be highly appreciated. Thanks
1985 was a very good year for sand and cement so you have been a little unlucky.
 

PRB_Luke

Member
@Blueplanet thank you for the information and photos. Looking closely at your photos i would advise getting an approved renderer in to look at this. Although only 3m2, there is a lot to do here. I would be very confident that once the render has been removed, you are going to have some structural damage. its a single layer block id say, and if not already damaged i would say there is a big chance of doing so when removing the render. Also to consider is the ashlar cutting detail. This is a skilled process and can look absolutely awful if not done correctly.

Other things to consider.

We wouldn't advise the use of stainless steel beads. Almost all rendering is now done with PVC beads and yes these should be adhere on with the product itself not mechanical fixings.
 

Cockney1

Well-Known Member
Hi thanks for the messages above.

OK, so I have never done any rendering. However, I am happy to do tasks around the house and have recently painted (after removing old paint) the 30 metres of render around my house. I repaired minor bits of damage such as bits of render fallen off at the bottom corners - using masonary filler such as Toupret F filler.

The one-piece that I have left is where the render is cracked. Whoever, repaired and rendered it before removed the stop and angle beads. Therefore it is blown out and cracked (photo to follow). It is roughly 3 sqm in total. The original is sand and cement from 1985.

I got several quotes and was quote around £1300 for it so I thought I would give it a go and save some cash which is hard to come by at the moment as I am not working due Covid 19.

I was thinking of using Tarmac One Coat Render from Wickes or B&Q as it saves me the hassle of mixing sand and cement and I can just add water etc. I was also going to use stainless steel beads - given the small area I am not too worried about them costing a little more.

Looking at some videos I was thinking of using an angle grinder to remove the old render - which I think maybe the hardest part. Then I need to attach the angle and stop beads. I read I can use the render to attach the angle beads and some adhesive for the stop beads (using a spirit level to ensure they are straight).

After that put the render mix on the walls and use a straight edge (a piece of wood) to make sure it's all flat. And finally use a wet sponge float to create a slightly non smooth look - the rest of the house is flat but not smooth looking - if you get what I mean. Any comments/suggestions would be highly appreciated. Thanks
@ballsdeep
 

tapit

Well-Known Member
@Blueplanet thank you for the information and photos. Looking closely at your photos i would advise getting an approved renderer in to look at this. Although only 3m2, there is a lot to do here. I would be very confident that once the render has been removed, you are going to have some structural damage. its a single layer block id say, and if not already damaged i would say there is a big chance of doing so when removing the render. Also to consider is the ashlar cutting detail. This is a skilled process and can look absolutely awful if not done correctly.

Other things to consider.

We wouldn't advise the use of stainless steel beads. Almost all rendering is now done with PVC beads and yes these should be adhere on with the product itself not mechanical fixings.
Why not mechanical fixings Luke?
 
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