damp treatment process?

legepe

New Member
Hi guys,
I have a damp problem which seems to be mainly rising damp and I need to know if the following process and products are correct
1. removed old plaster - upto 1.2m from floor
2. drill and inject into mortar line on all walls with (dry tech cream)
3. tank concrete floor and all walls upto 1.2m from floor with (febtank super) two coats (24hr drying between coats)
4. plaster with thistle dri-coat
5. finish with multi-finish
Can anyone tell me if this sounds about right.. also, do I need to pva between any of these processes?
Thanks a lot...
legepe
 

vfr12

MOTORC*NT
Never done aquariums Vincey! I am afraid not much from me........ without pictures, substrate etc. Why people think everyone is using the same paper in the toilet?
 

Dropsalot

Private Member
Hi guys,
I have a damp problem which seems to be mainly rising damp and I need to know if the following process and products are correct
1. removed old plaster - upto 1.2m from floor
2. drill and inject into mortar line on all walls with (dry tech cream)
3. tank concrete floor and all walls upto 1.2m from floor with (febtank super) two coats (24hr drying between coats)
4. plaster with thistle dri-coat
5. finish with multi-finish
Can anyone tell me if this sounds about right.. also, do I need to pva between any of these processes?
Thanks a lot...
legepe
The process described seems ok. I never use pva, use sbr instead as part of slurry mix pre tanking if walls are falling to bits, usually or needed.
 

gps

Well-Known Member
Hi guys,
I have a damp problem which seems to be mainly rising damp and I need to know if the following process and products are correct
1. removed old plaster - upto 1.2m from floor
2. drill and inject into mortar line on all walls with (dry tech cream)
3. tank concrete floor and all walls upto 1.2m from floor with (febtank super) two coats (24hr drying between coats)
4. plaster with thistle dri-coat
5. finish with multi-finish
Can anyone tell me if this sounds about right.. also, do I need to pva between any of these processes?
Thanks a lot...
legepe

Why are you tanking the walls up to 1.2 ? Presumably this is because you are in a semi basement ?
Process listed seems ok apart from the above question, no pva needed except for above the 1.2 line, btw don't let them only skim half the wall, skim the whole wall it's a proper bug bear of mine.
 

Arti

Well-Known Member
Before you go doing all that, why do you think it's rising damp?. What sort of walls are they? Cavity, solid? Is it an external wall/ party wall. What's the outside ground level likeWhat's up with the floor?? Plenty of questions there before you get the kanga out.
 

legepe

New Member
The walls are not that bad really.. (not falling appart)
They are solid brick walls, external and internal.
The floor is concrete, not sure about any proper dpc? (when I removed lino and there was plenty of wet underneath it)
Its a small area around 4.5m by 1.8m with very little venterlation. Its been a kitchen at some point as there is an old solid wall pantry (see picks attached)
I think it to be mainly rising damp.. there is a problem with drainage outside as the downpipes from gutter go stright down to ground level and relese the water on concrete path behind the effected area (I will obviously have these re directed to mains sewer)
I need to plaster board (dot n dab) onto three of the effected walls and the other walls are rendered to brick.
The pantry on the inside is a bit of a problem as the mortar lines are too bad to inject and I cant tank it on the inside as it has been painted.
Thanks for all your serious comments.. any further advice will be very much appreciated..
 

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flynnyman

Well-Known Member
Should of asked before you hacked off the plaster it needs insulating and ventilation probably just cold walls, also sort the problems outside first or your wasting your time. I wouldn't dot and dab you will just get cold spots.
 

legepe

New Member
Should of asked before you hacked off the plaster it needs insulating and ventilation probably just cold walls, also sort the problems outside first or your wasting your time. I wouldn't dot and dab you will just get cold spots.
Thanks for reply flynnyman. When you say insulate do u mean cover all existing wall surfices with kingspan n plaster board? Also now I've already done it should I still tank walls n then render everything with thistle dri-coat? I've already bought all tanking slurry.
 

flynnyman

Well-Known Member
Thanks for reply flynnyman. When you say insulate do u mean cover all existing wall surfices with kingspan n plaster board? Also now I've already done it should I still tank walls n then render everything with thistle dri-coat? I've already bought all tanking slurry.
yes batton and insulate the walls are still gonna be cold once you are back at square one.
 

legepe

New Member
What about the tanking? Should I still do it as I've bought it n I'm told its none returnable product. Its such a small space I didn't want to make it smaller with battening the walls! Is there no other way?
 

flynnyman

Well-Known Member
What about the tanking? Should I still do it as I've bought it n I'm told its none returnable product. Its such a small space I didn't want to make it smaller with battening the walls! Is there no other way?
Without insulating the outside not really, maybe have a radiator in there and a vent and no water ie sink or toilet.
 

Marshy

Private Member
You would be best using a damp proof membrane on those walls. Im having to do the same at my new house. Uncovering lots of damp but in my case its condensation mostly and not rising. Have a look at Safeguards website and the dryzone systems (y)
 

Arti

Well-Known Member
What about the tanking? Should I still do it as I've bought it n I'm told its none returnable product. Its such a small space I didn't want to make it smaller with battening the walls! Is there no other way?
You can hack it all off, tank it then dab insulated boards
 

gps

Well-Known Member
cos its not cavity walls

The walls will be bone dry as is always the case on rising damp work, you take the plaster off and the walls are dryer than gandis flip flops.
Tanking is for basements, wet rooms, swimming pools etc not above ground walls with nought wrong with them
 

Arti

Well-Known Member
The walls will be bone dry as is always the case on rising damp work, you take the plaster off and the walls are dryer than gandis flip flops.
Tanking is for basements, wet rooms, swimming pools etc not above ground walls with nought wrong with them
How can the walls be bone dry if you have a damp issue ?? Im well aware of how to install tanking systems, he has solid walls which can be susceptible to penetrating damp so you either waterproof them from the outside or inside, he needs to increase the thermal value of the walls, so the solution would be to prevent further ingress of moisture with a cementitious tanking system and dab insulation boards. I dont agree with using a membrane system above ground as you need a drainage system.

Also Gandhi didnt wear flips flops he wore sandals. The term flip flops wasnt used till the 1970's
 

gps

Well-Known Member
How can the walls be bone dry if you have a damp issue ?? Im well aware of how to install tanking systems, he has solid walls which can be susceptible to penetrating damp so you either waterproof them from the outside or inside, he needs to increase the thermal value of the walls, so the solution would be to prevent further ingress of moisture with a cementitious tanking system and dab insulation boards. I dont agree with using a membrane system above ground as you need a drainage system.

Also Gandhi didnt wear flips flops he wore sandals. The term flip flops wasnt used till the 1970's

Those walls are bone dry as you will know if you have done this type of work. Deal with the real problem instead of masking the issue is the bast way forward or you will start seeing patches coming over the top of his 1.2 line in no time.

I Stand corrected on Gandhis footwear, never let it be said I do not admit when I'm wrong
 

vfr12

MOTORC*NT
I think you both are wrong! He is building aquarium and he need to tank the walls up to the ceiling, at least then the rising damp on the next floor will be successful dealed with, unless he goes for two levels aquarium.
 

Arti

Well-Known Member
I never said to tank it up to 1.2m. I said hack it all off. He's struggling for space so in order to increase the thermal value of the walls using insulated boards would be beneficial and a tanking product woukd prevent a further ingress of moisture. I don't think it rising damp either.

You've comment a few times but not given any advice to the op's post.

I wait with baited breath..........:)
 

gps

Well-Known Member
I never said to tank it up to 1.2m. I said hack it all off. He's struggling for space so in order to increase the thermal value of the walls using insulated boards would be beneficial and a tanking product woukd prevent a further ingress of moisture. I don't think it rising damp either.

You've comment a few times but not given any advice to the op's post.

I wait with baited breath..........:)

That's because I asked why he was tanking the wall up to 1.2, and he never answered.
 

vfr12

MOTORC*NT
I never said to tank it up to 1.2m. I said hack it all off. He's struggling for space so in order to increase the thermal value of the walls using insulated boards would be beneficial and a tanking product woukd prevent a further ingress of moisture. I don't think it rising damp either.

You've comment a few times but not given any advice to the op's post.

I wait with baited breath..........:)
Ok . I'll try my best :)
I haven't commented cos I don't see a problem . Most people are taking the instructions and applications strait out f the book, but what they don't know is rising damp don't exist. Well, of course any company making money from it will deny it and rightly so. You can't stop water no matter how you tank it or block it. Do to its molecular structure water travels and always finds its way. The quickest way is when in contact with diferent type of surfaces, which always have diferent temperature, which transforms the water into hard , liquid or steam . I will not go down the road explaining what the other stages of water transformations are, it will take a wile :D.
So, since I don't blive in " rising damp" , whatever this is, I will start from my point where I have said - water travels and you can't stop it, just liked to make my self clear n case you lost me with all water stages etc:D
In this case we have condensation build at the bottom of he walls , which might be caused by underground water , or cold spots.
Underground water can be reduced significantly with a French drain around the house and sorting out the gutter and pipes.Something like this can do the job

IMG_1541.JPG

IMG_1542.JPG

IMG_1543.JPG


In more severe cases you have to use the heavy artillery
IMG_1544.JPG

Of course the property has to be assessed my someone who know Mother Nature, not the local supplier of tanking and rising damp malarkey.
Moving forward, once the underground water is sorted, we move inside.
The biggest problem in modern houses and households is condensation. Condensation is when hot air meets cold spot and the water molecules in the air become bigger and bigger , this is when you see wet spots. Very visual on non porous surfaces like glass and steel. " Breathable" renders are very helpful n this case instead tanking the wall, which makes the problem even worse- soggy wall and water will move to another spot more warm and dry until it finds lower temperature spot and become damp. In this case will happen exactly this if the op tank the walls. Water will find its way, if is not on the other side of the wall then on the next one and instead fighting the water travel he better redirect the flow .
Another misconception is when modern building gets mixed with traditional buildings, but that's another story :D. I will state only that the one is build to stop water from coming in and the other to let it out and be able to deal with it.Simples and there is no way to explain your lifetime experience and knowledge with not agreeing to the mass misconception f rising damp, hence avoiding any structural comment , unless I see a challenge, like now:D
Hope this help the op to do the best in his case- NOT TO f**k**g TANK THE WALLS
and use @Bauwer products
:birra:
 

Arti

Well-Known Member
Ok . I'll try my best :)
I haven't commented cos I don't see a problem . Most people are taking the instructions and applications strait out f the book, but what they don't know is rising damp don't exist. Well, of course any company making money from it will deny it and rightly so. You can't stop water no matter how you tank it or block it. Do to its molecular structure water travels and always finds its way. The quickest way is when in contact with diferent type of surfaces, which always have diferent temperature, which transforms the water into hard , liquid or steam . I will not go down the road explaining what the other stages of water transformations are, it will take a wile :D.
So, since I don't blive in " rising damp" , whatever this is, I will start from my point where I have said - water travels and you can't stop it, just liked to make my self clear n case you lost me with all water stages etc:D
In this case we have condensation build at the bottom of he walls , which might be caused by underground water , or cold spots.
Underground water can be reduced significantly with a French drain around the house and sorting out the gutter and pipes.Something like this can do the job

View attachment 15771
View attachment 15772
View attachment 15775

In more severe cases you have to use the heavy artillery
View attachment 15774
Of course the property has to be assessed my someone who know Mother Nature, not the local supplier of tanking and rising damp malarkey.
Moving forward, once the underground water is sorted, we move inside.
The biggest problem in modern houses and households is condensation. Condensation is when hot air meets cold spot and the water molecules in the air become bigger and bigger , this is when you see wet spots. Very visual on non porous surfaces like glass and steel. " Breathable" renders are very helpful n this case instead tanking the wall, which makes the problem even worse- soggy wall and water will move to another spot more warm and dry until it finds lower temperature spot and become damp. In this case will happen exactly this if the op tank the walls. Water will find its way, if is not on the other side of the wall then on the next one and instead fighting the water travel he better redirect the flow .
Another misconception is when modern building gets mixed with traditional buildings, but that's another story :D. I will state only that the one is build to stop water from coming in and the other to let it out and be able to deal with it.Simples and there is no way to explain your lifetime experience and knowledge with not agreeing to the mass misconception f rising damp, hence avoiding any structural comment , unless I see a challenge, like now:D
Hope this help the op to do the best in his case- NOT TO f**k**g TANK THE WALLS
and use @Bauwer products
:birra:
We've just lost the thread to Bauwer now.
 

Vincey

Private Member
Love reading damp threads ... @Bauwer while we on the subject I asked bauwer man.ie but didn't get the right answer so can you put a link up for internal bauwer finish please, I can't find it
Thanks Bb
 

gps

Well-Known Member
So you don't have a solution then??

A solution for a problem that doesn't exist lol. His walls are bone dry like I said before, so tanking them is silly.
He has drilled his holes for a new dpc which is fine, sand and cement or
Renovating plaster and skim.
Ensure external Ground level is correct, pointing is good. Good ventilation and jobs a good un

If you want additional thermal improvement may I suggest the game changing and product of last year that members from here are coining it in from, I suggest to you aerotherm pmsl
 

Orangemachineman

Well-Known Member
Those walls are bone dry as you will know if you have done this type of work. Deal with the real problem instead of masking the issue is the bast way forward or you will start seeing patches coming over the top of his 1.2 line in no time.

I Stand corrected on Gandhis footwear, never let it be said I do not admit when I'm wrong
Are really a plasterer?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Pagey

Private Member
Ok . I'll try my best :)
I haven't commented cos I don't see a problem . Most people are taking the instructions and applications strait out f the book, but what they don't know is rising damp don't exist. Well, of course any company making money from it will deny it and rightly so. You can't stop water no matter how you tank it or block it. Do to its molecular structure water travels and always finds its way. The quickest way is when in contact with diferent type of surfaces, which always have diferent temperature, which transforms the water into hard , liquid or steam . I will not go down the road explaining what the other stages of water transformations are, it will take a wile :D.
So, since I don't blive in " rising damp" , whatever this is, I will start from my point where I have said - water travels and you can't stop it, just liked to make my self clear n case you lost me with all water stages etc:D
In this case we have condensation build at the bottom of he walls , which might be caused by underground water , or cold spots.
Underground water can be reduced significantly with a French drain around the house and sorting out the gutter and pipes.Something like this can do the job

View attachment 15771
View attachment 15772
View attachment 15775

In more severe cases you have to use the heavy artillery
View attachment 15774
Of course the property has to be assessed my someone who know Mother Nature, not the local supplier of tanking and rising damp malarkey.
Moving forward, once the underground water is sorted, we move inside.
The biggest problem in modern houses and households is condensation. Condensation is when hot air meets cold spot and the water molecules in the air become bigger and bigger , this is when you see wet spots. Very visual on non porous surfaces like glass and steel. " Breathable" renders are very helpful n this case instead tanking the wall, which makes the problem even worse- soggy wall and water will move to another spot more warm and dry until it finds lower temperature spot and become damp. In this case will happen exactly this if the op tank the walls. Water will find its way, if is not on the other side of the wall then on the next one and instead fighting the water travel he better redirect the flow .
Another misconception is when modern building gets mixed with traditional buildings, but that's another story :D. I will state only that the one is build to stop water from coming in and the other to let it out and be able to deal with it.Simples and there is no way to explain your lifetime experience and knowledge with not agreeing to the mass misconception f rising damp, hence avoiding any structural comment , unless I see a challenge, like now:D
Hope this help the op to do the best in his case- NOT TO f**k**g TANK THE WALLS
and use @Bauwer products
:birra:
Basically put a French drain in on a massive scale is all I'm getting from that lol
 
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