Black Mold/Damp

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Surfsn07

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I am after some advice on a house that I have just purchased and there are several areas of black mold. The seller, who I can trust, said that they have had experts in and they said that its down to poor circulation and tenants, as it was rented, drying clothes on the radiators and never opening windows etc.

It is a 70's built house that was built in sections and stuck together, you can see from the outside wall the 4 sections and where they are joined. Outside its red brick and inside the walls are concrete. I have a few friends that own these and they say that they are known for not being the best when it comes to damp/black mold. As its a semi detached I was looking at options of trying to stop the mold growing in the corners of the external walls.

I have been told I could do the following:

- Damp proof tanking on the concrete, baton the walls and then moisture resistant plasterboard before skimming

- Damp proof paint, dot and dab normal plasterboard and skim

- Damp proof plaster on the concrete

- just skim and then paint the walls with damp prevention additive

All of the above then need the correct steps to prevent condensation as much as possible, extractor fans in the kitchen/bathroom, not drying clothes on the radiators, venting windows etc.

Can you help with the correct steps to take?
 
Get some condensation mold spray stuff from B&Q and keep on top of it every few months, vent the room,empty sinks,toilet seats down, fish tank lids on,move plants,no wet shoes or wet coats, gloves and scarves AND more importantly if you are drinking a pint try and drink it as quickly as possible (this can be used as proof to any one reading).
 
:RpS_lol: Fill a pint to the top with water, put it in a place where it wont get knocked over, leave it for a few weeks and see how much is still left in.

Empty sinks and put toilet seats down hahaha, I hope you were joking.
 
Buy a positive air circulation unit it forces all the air out your house and filters your air as well great for allergies to but these pav units are brilliant for black spot and 99 percent of the time cure it as there is alwaus fresh air in your house not moisture laiden particles.
i can give you some good model names ifyou want and easy to fit
 
:RpS_lol: Fill a pint to the top with water, put it in a place where it wont get knocked over, leave it for a few weeks and see how much is still left in.

Empty sinks and put toilet seats down hahaha, I hope you were joking.

no serious what do you think them fluffy toiletseat covers were for? decoration lol no serious i removed a toilet from my small toilet and the condensation that was dripping off the ceiling disapeared.
 
agree with el ... no need to plaster a special conensation fan is all you need
not cheap .300 but easy fix

and wash off with removal kit.
 
no serious what do you think them fluffy toiletseat covers were for? decoration lol no serious i removed a toilet from my small toilet and the condensation that was dripping off the ceiling disapeared.

how did you remove a toilet from a toilet??..........was it like those russian doll toys and the toilets get smaller....................:RpS_laugh:
 
Buy a positive air circulation unit it forces all the air out your house and filters your air as well great for allergies to but these pav units are brilliant for black spot and 99 percent of the time cure it as there is alwaus fresh air in your house not moisture laiden particles.
i can give you some good model names ifyou want and easy to fit
Interested in knowing about these myself, would you place one in each room like a bathroom extractor?
 
No you place in the upstairs hall towards downstairs where you can get the best air circulation around your house cost almost nothing to run but the benefits are well worth it.

When refurbing solid brick houses we always reccomend pav units
 
Actually you need to cut down on the actual problem, basically you are getting black spot mould on the coldest parts of the house.

Usually external walls, what you need to do is increase the insulation in the property, use a clothes dryer instead of radiators, use heat recovery extractor fans and make sure you increase the airflow.

Keep doors closed when using kitchen and bathrooms, and also make sure that your radiators are the right size for the room, plumbers don't tend to use the best of radiators, i always recommend double radiators.

If its a tenanted property then a PIV system is the best way to go, the best ones have a heater that preheats the air to about 14oc.
 
1970 house ,so that is a cavity ,just condensation ,some good advise from the guys above :RpS_thumbup: best of luck with it
 
the ones carlos is showing are very good, but make sure you get one with a heater in as the ones without will make the house bloody freezing!
 
i pay £250 plus vat, they wire straight into the lighting circuit and are around 70w on high speed, fit the grill through your landing ceiling, they must be 1m away from your smoke alarm, you may have to alter your loft hatch as they dont always fit.
 
Before you spend any of your hard earns,clean the mould off best you can,bleach is good if poss,get a desert bowl of salt ,put it where the mould is ,then check on it for a week or so ,works every time ,well there's no harm in trying it first and it won't cost you a penny.
 
Before you spend any of your hard earns,clean the mould off best you can,bleach is good if poss,get a desert bowl of salt ,put it where the mould is ,then check on it for a week or so ,works every time ,well there's no harm in trying it first and it won't cost you a penny.
I hope this not like catching the rabbit by putting salt on his tail..?
 
More difficult in a flat with concrete ceilings though sadly?


the flat master type fans are mounted on a outside wall and suck air through the back. You just knock a hole through the wall, put an air brick on the outside and it will suck through it.

They also sell loads of trunking and ducting so you can mount and vent it almost anywhere.
 
I think that PIV is being put into new builds now, think people are realising the old drafts were a good thing :RpS_thumbup:
 
Thanks for the advice I will look into the PIV.

Is it worth dot and dabbing plasterboard on the walls that are external, or putting up batons and plasterboarding so I can insulate behind them to help prevent the walls being so cold or is this just a waste of money?

And are the additives to paint to prevent mold any good?
 
Battens and thermal plasterboards mate :RpS_thumbup:

try these:
https://www.british-gypsum.com/products/plasterboard___accessories/gyproc_thermal.aspx
 
Thanks for the advice I will look into the PIV.

Is it worth dot and dabbing plasterboard on the walls that are external, or putting up batons and plasterboarding so I can insulate behind them to help prevent the walls being so cold or is this just a waste of money?

And are the additives to paint to prevent mold any good?

The only way to stop condensation is to remove or prevent the moisture from being in the atmosphere inside the property.

Insulating walls will help as the condensation always forms on a cold surface, so you need to warm all the walls and ceiling. However if the moisture is still present it'll just form where you can't insulate, the glass in windows, toilet, hand basin etc.

Good ventilation and keeping the it warm will help.
 
My guess as well. I have seen it before where its so bad there was puddles on the window board from the glass literally running with water.
 
Carlos how much do the PIV's cost installed, i was told by someone that the envirovent guys are charging near the £1000 mark for a Installed PIV.

I was thinking about offering it as a service but i couldnt sleep at night charging near £1000 fitted.
 
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