Working on film sets and studios

ty_goodall98

New Member
Hi, my names ty, and I’m looking for advice on how to get into studios and film sets, I’m w fibrous plasterer. Any help would be appreciated
 

smoother09

Well-Known Member
Knowing benny from crossroads might help!
download (3).jpeg
 

Smooth criminal

Active Member
I used to know a guy who did just that went full time plastering sets for films really good money too.. I think it was pot luck as he worked for a set designer.
Good luck though.
 

MakeItSmooth

Well-Known Member
Hi, my names ty, and I’m looking for advice on how to get into studios and film sets, I’m w fibrous plasterer. Any help would be appreciated

Maybe try contacting film production companies, and (sorry to suggest something obvious) regional television studios. Some will have websites and may even have contact details for job vacancies.
Even if there are no vacancies, or no relevant vacancies, you can still contact them to say what kind of skills you have to offer, and politely ask them to keep your contact details for future reference. You can also ask them if they'd be kind enough to offer you any pointers about how & where you might find studio/film set work.

You'll have to decide for yourself if an e-mail or a real posted letter is better. If we didn't live in strange (Covid) times, it might have been worth the effort of actually visting studio receptions/offices in person, to have a face to face conversation with a real humanbeing, but perhaps a phone call would be a good option, as a compromise between visting in person and sending a letter/e-mail.

Whenever you ask someone for help, it's wise to make it as easy as possible for that person to give you the help you are asking for. If your request causes work for them to respond, then they are less likely to help you.

Therefore, bear in mind that if you send a letter or an email, then they are going to have to sit down for several minutes and make the effort to compose an email of letter to respond to you, which they may be too busy to do, or may resent having to do. However, if you ring them, then very little effort is required for them to answer your questions, and you can alter your questions depending on their responses during the conversation. You might also have a better chance of helpful advice because people like to communicate on a warmer, more human, person-to-person level (which a phone call partially provides), whereas letters or emails are more detached.


One last suggestion: try to find out where something is being filmed in your local area - ideally a film. Then go along to the location and, in between shoots, see if you can strike up a conversation with one or more of the people working on the shoot, telling them your skills and that you'd really appreciate some pointers on how to get into film/TV/studio set work. You might get some very useful advice and pointers - and if you're really lucky, perhaps even one or two potential contacts. This might be the best approach, because it's less formal than turning up at their offices unannounced or ringing them unannounced (although, let's face it, a phonecall is pretty harmless).
 

smoother09

Well-Known Member
Don't make no odds where you work what are your reasons do you just want to rub shoulders with the dingles fk that just go where the money is I worked for gabby logan /yorath back then lovely woman ya ya paid same as any other cnt
 

paulf

Well-Known Member
try the bbc
Worked with a wee guy from Aintree 5ft 3 he did film and TV work, worked in the states. He got into it by way of serving his time at a firm who did mostly fibrous work and they got a contract to fake up some sets with walls etc. He just got to know the companies who did this kind of thing.
That's all by chance, I'd imagine that it's much the same today.
 

The Hobo

Well-Known Member
Worked with a wee guy from Aintree 5ft 3 he did film and TV work, worked in the states. He got into it by way of serving his time at a firm who did mostly fibrous work and they got a contract to fake up some sets with walls etc. He just got to know the companies who did this kind of thing.
That's all by chance, I'd imagine that it's much the same today.
his name wasnt mclory by any chance paul
 

John j

Mono Don
Maybe try contacting film production companies, and (sorry to suggest something obvious) regional television studios. Some will have websites and may even have contact details for job vacancies.
Even if there are no vacancies, or no relevant vacancies, you can still contact them to say what kind of skills you have to offer, and politely ask them to keep your contact details for future reference. You can also ask them if they'd be kind enough to offer you any pointers about how & where you might find studio/film set work.

You'll have to decide for yourself if an e-mail or a real posted letter is better. If we didn't live in strange (Covid) times, it might have been worth the effort of actually visting studio receptions/offices in person, to have a face to face conversation with a real humanbeing, but perhaps a phone call would be a good option, as a compromise between visting in person and sending a letter/e-mail.

Whenever you ask someone for help, it's wise to make it as easy as possible for that person to give you the help you are asking for. If your request causes work for them to respond, then they are less likely to help you.

Therefore, bear in mind that if you send a letter or an email, then they are going to have to sit down for several minutes and make the effort to compose an email of letter to respond to you, which they may be too busy to do, or may resent having to do. However, if you ring them, then very little effort is required for them to answer your questions, and you can alter your questions depending on their responses during the conversation. You might also have a better chance of helpful advice because people like to communicate on a warmer, more human, person-to-person level (which a phone call partially provides), whereas letters or emails are more detached.


One last suggestion: try to find out where something is being filmed in your local area - ideally a film. Then go along to the location and, in between shoots, see if you can strike up a conversation with one or more of the people working on the shoot, telling them your skills and that you'd really appreciate some pointers on how to get into film/TV/studio set work. You might get some very useful advice and pointers - and if you're really lucky, perhaps even one or two potential contacts. This might be the best approach, because it's less formal than turning up at their offices unannounced or ringing them unannounced (although, let's face it, a phonecall is pretty harmless).
@Danny Can we have a fall asleep imoji
 

Brimstone

Well-Known Member
It is all sub-contracted out, layers upon layers, you use Google/search engines to find set production companies, Scenery manufacturuers, British Film Commission website for where studio production locations are, try to find a friendly face to explain what the business is about and what is expected.
Stage schools might be happy to talk to you about it, and might have leads - its all word of mouth and contacts.
 

smoother09

Well-Known Member
Worked on James bond set about 10 years ago actually still got the Aston Martin they gave me as a thanks for helping out got Daniel Craig on speed dial, don't really keep in touch after I shagged his wife!
 

superspread

Well-Known Member
My mate is in the studios , they are crying out for blokes , even if ur s**t u will earn 250 a day , it’s union rates and to regimented for me, he’s asked me a few times to join him but I’ve always swerved it
 

Bigstevehammer

Active Member
I think it’s more of who you know in this line of work,the moneys too good!!,and you see the world..
My mate did all the carpentry work for the mission impossible films,from the beginning..when the covid hit,they was paying him £400 a day just to stay in a hotel…in Italy and drink beer!!!…he is on friendly terms with Tom cruise and sends his kids xmas presents every year…signed Louis Vuitton boots last outing lol..

I am currently feeling sick
Writing this….I hate my life
 
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