Vinyl machine

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Hey guys I've just taken over my dad business at bygone interiors bases over in Upminster.ive got 20 years experience in the trade now.im just clearing out my workshop and I have a vinyl machine that I want rid of as for the past few years now I've been using cold pour (personal choice).its an old machine and even though it has everything including original buckets and lids and by looks of it the connected 30amp cable,it has to be wired into the workshop.im looking at £100 for it and I'm going to advertise it on eBay with picture.no item number yet but just look up vinyl machine (to melt rubber).cheers.
 

PlasterCraftDundee

Well-Known Member
Hey guys I've just taken over my dad business at bygone interiors bases over in Upminster.ive got 20 years experience in the trade now.im just clearing out my workshop and I have a vinyl machine that I want rid of as for the past few years now I've been using cold pour (personal choice).its an old machine and even though it has everything including original buckets and lids and by looks of it the connected 30amp cable,it has to be wired into the workshop.im looking at £100 for it and I'm going to advertise it on eBay with picture.no item number yet but just look up vinyl machine (to melt rubber).cheers.

What kind of equipment do you need for cold pour? I use melted rubber to make casts for enrichments, but find vinyl paint sticks to the rubber and makes the casts a bit rough until 3 or 4 have come out and the paint comes away.
 

FrankNewman275

Active Member
You don't need any equipment for cold pour other than a whisk to mix part A and part B , ( or bit of timber if your old school, the quality is much better but the cost higher .
We use cold pour for most of our small enrichments etc, but on larger moulds we use the hot melt in order to be competitive
It can be a bit unpredictable , you can get a super mould or one that requires cleaning using the same method
 

PlasterCraftDundee

Well-Known Member
You don't need any equipment for cold pour other than a whisk to mix part A and part B , ( or bit of timber if your old school, the quality is much better but the cost higher .
We use cold pour for most of our small enrichments etc, but on larger moulds we use the hot melt in order to be competitive
It can be a bit unpredictable , you can get a super mould or one that requires cleaning using the same method

So is the cold pour more expensive because you can't reuse the material, unlike melting rubber?
 

PlasterCraftDundee

Well-Known Member
Yes that's it , but the cold pour is definitely better for finish , so any stock moulds it's the one to use,
If it's a one off job then vinamould


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Any kind of cornice work I get is a one off job, usually cause of dry rot , which is probably why my dad always used hot pour. I could keep moulds of enrichments but as you probably know even if its the same kind of enrichment its unlikely to fit two different houses. Also we only run insitu, so a bit different to you guys I think.
 

FrankNewman275

Active Member
I know mate , looked at a job yesterday and four different profiles in one house , one builder told me we must have all the moulds and why are you charging for origination
I sent him a picture of our six month clear out with over 70 moulds in it .
Curious why you run everything in-situ , we only do that when its specified on a heritage job
 

PlasterCraftDundee

Well-Known Member
I'm not sure the reson to be honest, it was the way my dad was taught over 40 years ago and the way he's showed me. We only ever do restortstion work, maybe one or two lengths to run in a room, never done any new work, so making moulds and casting length would probably take longer? Only reason I can think of
 
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