Shadow gap beads

johniosaif

Private Member
starting a job soon, 3 new houses, they added shadow gap beads to the job around the door frames and along the stringer , they thought I could put the shadow gap beads before they fitted the frames , I suggested ,frames fitted first then the chippy to fit the beads as the are cut at 45s and need the right chopsaw metal blade . What say you
 

Mouldyoldspudgun

Well-Known Member
starting a job soon, 3 new houses, they added shadow gap beads to the job around the door frames and along the stringer , they thought I could put the shadow gap beads before they fitted the frames , I suggested ,frames fitted first then the chippy to fit the beads as the are cut at 45s and need the right chopsaw metal blade . What say you
Up to you but I know a man of your caliber is well capable
 

raggles

Private Member
Junior hacksaw and a tile trim mitre block to cut the beads. And yes deffo get the door frames fitted first.
 

theshed

Well-Known Member
If anyone has to put them up here's a little tip that worked for us. Cut the top bead straight and only mitre the sides. It makes the joins look spot on. Even cutting them with a mitre saw you tend to get little gaps where nothing is ever dead square.
 

malc

TPF Special Forces
we plastered a hospital with shadow beads around doors and at base of the walls, to give the walls a floating effect. on completion the NHS would not accept these as they are a dust trap the last thing you need in a hospital !
 

flynnyman

Well-Known Member
My mates in Sydney and this is all they have they don't have architrave, have a gooogle and see if there is a uk suppplier.
 

Olican

Private Member
starting a job soon, 3 new houses, they added shadow gap beads to the job around the door frames and along the stringer , they thought I could put the shadow gap beads before they fitted the frames , I suggested ,frames fitted first then the chippy to fit the beads as the are cut at 45s and need the right chopsaw metal blade . What say you

Definitely with frames in first, personally wish I'd gotten chippy to fit first. I didn't get on with the mitre saw, they made a really nice cut but nothing is ever truly 45degrees. I found putting the head on first then marking the 2 up rights and cutting with a hacksaw and touching up with a file. Came out nice , like everything got easier as it went along . Stairs were fun.
 

scottie5

Private Member
I Found they always crack around the doors the shadow bead detail.
Had the opportunity to try and Do the last couple a bit different and it worked out a lot easier I thought also cheaper on the beads and not a single crack anywhere.
started with a slighty Over sized opening then screwed a narrower rip of timber round the frame first fitted the door lining then cut the board to the edge of the inside timber and then before fixing the board slipped a board edging bead over the board then fixed it.

Screenshot_2018-03-21-22-52-31-1.png

Screenshot_2018-03-21-22-43-05.png


Perhaps not the usual way of doing it but worked out well.
 

Olican

Private Member
I Found they always crack around the doors the shadow bead detail.
Had the opportunity to try and Do the last couple a bit different and it worked out a lot easier I thought also cheaper on the beads and not a single crack anywhere.
started with a slighty Over sized opening then screwed a narrower rip of timber round the frame first fitted the door lining then cut the board to the edge of the inside timber and then before fixing the board slipped a board edging bead over the board then fixed it.

View attachment 22466
View attachment 22469

Perhaps not the usual way of doing it but worked out well.

I did something similar along the stringer where it met some stairs, I stuck a piece of doorstop to back of board then slid a 553 edge bead to the board, probably makes no sense but worked a treat
 

theshed

Well-Known Member
If anyone has to put them up here's a little tip that worked for us. Cut the top bead straight and only mitre the sides. It makes the joins look spot on. Even cutting them with a mitre saw you tend to get little gaps where nothing is ever dead square.
We were doing float and set when using this method, obviously no need on board and skim.
 
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