Plastered wall has a curve

Chunky Gilmore

New Member
Hi there, I'm wondering if anyone could advise me. I've had my lounge plastered and a new fireplace installed. The fire surround is straight but the wall isn't which means it's flush at the sides but curves inwards towards the middle leaving a curved gap. Is my only option to get the whole chimney breast re-plastered or is there a way to plaster just the middle area to fill the gap? Thanks, CG
 

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Monkey Boy

Well-Known Member
A plastered wall sometimes gets a bit thicker a coating towards the angle beads
What is fire surround made of?
Can you scribe it in at the extremities?
 

essexandy

The Lake Governor
Hi there, I'm wondering if anyone could advise me. I've had my lounge plastered and a new fireplace installed. The fire surround is straight but the wall isn't which means it's flush at the sides but curves inwards towards the middle leaving a curved gap. Is my only option to get the whole chimney breast re-plastered or is there a way to plaster just the middle area to fill the gap? Thanks, CG
I'd say looking at the vertical gaps both sides, that whoever fitted the fire surround should have either scribed the mantle to the wall or let it into the wall.
 

Chunky Gilmore

New Member
Thanks Monkey Boy, thanks essexandy. The fire surround is made from MDF, it was the guy who installed the fireplace that told me the wall chimney breast was wonky. The surround is fitted with brackets so it lifts off
 

Brimstone

Well-Known Member
If that is a standard limestone fireplace they should have filled the gaps with the white floor tile cement, since it's not really practical to scribe stone on site. When its done it's a good match and no-one really notices.
Get you some white floor tile cement - costs a bit but ordinary tile cement usually too white, and cheaper than the unneccessary plastering.
You might get away with some standard tyype of filler but I think it'll crack - actually, thinking on it, Pink Gripfill should work and cheaper than a bag of floor tile cement.

Is that your fkng air supply on a shelf??? how long before someone blocks it with books/other? Not a safe or ok install. Whoever put that fireplace in for you needs "advising".
 

Chunky Gilmore

New Member
If that is a standard limestone fireplace they should have filled the gaps with the white floor tile cement, since it's not really practical to scribe stone on site. When its done it's a good match and no-one really notices.
Get you some white floor tile cement - costs a bit but ordinary tile cement usually too white, and cheaper than the unneccessary plastering.
You might get away with some standard tyype of filler but I think it'll crack - actually, thinking on it, Pink Gripfill should work and cheaper than a bag of floor tile cement.

Is that your fkng air supply on a shelf??? how long before someone blocks it with books/other? Not a safe or ok install. Whoever put that fireplace in for you needs "advising".
Cheers Brimstone, the surround is actually made of MDF - it's fixed with brackets so lifts off. The fireplace is just for show - we had a back boiler that was removed so it's not a working fireplace anymore
 

Chunky Gilmore

New Member
A plastered wall sometimes gets a bit thicker a coating towards the angle beads
What is fire surround made of?
Can you scribe it in at the extremities?
Thanks Monkey Boy - that's exactly the issue but not sure what to do for the best result. The surround is MDF - can that be scribed without damaging the surface?
 

zombie

Private Member
Hi there, I'm wondering if anyone could advise me. I've had my lounge plastered and a new fireplace installed. The fire surround is straight but the wall isn't which means it's flush at the sides but curves inwards towards the middle leaving a curved gap. Is my only option to get the whole chimney breast re-plastered or is there a way to plaster just the middle area to fill the gap? Thanks, CG
Ffs all lifes big problems that...decorators calk literally 10 second job
 

tapit

Well-Known Member
If that is a standard limestone fireplace they should have filled the gaps with the white floor tile cement, since it's not really practical to scribe stone on site. When its done it's a good match and no-one really notices.
Get you some white floor tile cement - costs a bit but ordinary tile cement usually too white, and cheaper than the unneccessary plastering.
You might get away with some standard tyype of filler but I think it'll crack - actually, thinking on it, Pink Gripfill should work and cheaper than a bag of floor tile cement.

Is that your fkng air supply on a shelf??? how long before someone blocks it with books/other? Not a safe or ok install. Whoever put that fireplace in for you needs "advising".
Taxi for @Brimstone
 

Dollar

Well-Known Member
The surround is straight the wall is not ..
Easi fill gap blend it sand it flat it paint it ....
 

Elite exteriors

Well-Known Member
Hi there, I'm wondering if anyone could advise me. I've had my lounge plastered and a new fireplace installed. The fire surround is straight but the wall isn't which means it's flush at the sides but curves inwards towards the middle leaving a curved gap. Is my only option to get the whole chimney breast re-plastered or is there a way to plaster just the middle area to fill the gap? Thanks, CG
Just f**k**g calk it ,it should have been done anyway to finish it
 

Elite exteriors

Well-Known Member
Thanks. It’s 5mm at the widest point which I would have thought too big an area to caulk
Just had my own fireplace done with the surround all the did was calk it 5mm is f**k all to fill when the wall was decorated you can't even tell its how it's done you are making a mountain out of a mole hill
 

MakeItSmooth

Well-Known Member
Option 1) Extremely easy to scribe that top to perfectly fit the wall.

Option 2) caulk the life out of it

If it was my fireplace, I'd choose option 1 in a heartbeat, but option 2 will work OK.
 

ChrispyUK

Well-Known Member
You can’t scribe it as then you’d have to remove material from the sides.

I have a section in the Chrispy house diary about fitting a fire surround, but it uses advanced technology called a straight edge at the plastering stage.
 

MakeItSmooth

Well-Known Member
You can’t scribe it as then you’d have to remove material from the sides.

Bearing in mind that it's just MDF, it shouldn't be rocket science to remove it from the surround, scribe it and then re-affix it.

I have a section in the Chrispy house diary about fitting a fire surround, but it uses advanced technology called a straight edge at the plastering stage.

Do you not think the horse has already bolted from that particular stable...?
Chuckle TPF.gif
 
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