Plasterboard suggestions for the ceiling of a small en-suite

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adelast

New Member
Hi everyone,

I am planning to remove the old ceiling plasterboard from the ensuite and replace it. I was thinking to replace it with a plasterboard mould resistant but I really have no idea. The project is to use plasterboard and paint on it, no cladding or PVC. Any recommendation for the type and the process?

Many thanks!
 

adelast

New Member
Whats wrong with the existing ceiling
It seems to be bare plasterboard that has been painted, I am renovating the entire ensuite using Aquaboard on the shower area so I'd rather renovate it entirely (we recently bought the property, 60+ years old house, we moved in and starting renovating it room by room)
 
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adelast

New Member
Do you have an extractor fan fitted? If not get 1 as will help reduce mould/ moisture buildup
Yes I have a fan but it needs to be adjusted. Basically it's a stand alone fan placed in the attic that has a plastic flexible pipe attached to the ceiling. I need to adjust it as is not well attached to the ceiling so it's not able to take away most of the steam
 

Brimstone

Well-Known Member
You are extracting damp air and blowing it into the attic? Duh, As per Crispy; Board, plaster, Zinser, new hole in wall and inline extractor to the outside world.

Can we have a pic of it when its finished, (please!) preferably with your missus and you in the shower (mostly your missus ,but we have to cater for all types on here now).
 

bof

Well-Known Member
Nothing wrong with ceiling extractor , needs to be extended and vented under eaves or proper tile vent
 

Brimstone

Well-Known Member
Nothing wrong with ceiling extractor , needs to be extended and vented under eaves or proper tile vent
In theory, no. The flexible plastic concertina pipe is the problem, creates a small amount of heat, thence condensation in attic, catches and collects fluff, reduces draw of fan massively. Often thrown into the loft by the builder, overlong, kinks/blocks, you name it.
If you are refitting a bathroom you might as well fit a through wall or with a short hard plastic smooth wall pipe.
 

adelast

New Member
You are extracting damp air and blowing it into the attic? Duh, As per Crispy; Board, plaster, Zinser, new hole in wall and inline extractor to the outside world.

Can we have a pic of it when its finished, (please!) preferably with your missus and you in the shower (mostly your missus ,but we have to cater for all types on here now).
A flexible pipe is going from the ceiling (although like I said, it's not well attached) then to a in-line extractor and then from the extractor there's another flexible pipe going into the external part of the roof.

It does looks powerful I think it just needs new pipes.

I'll surely share the picture, today we started demolishing the en-suite, the tiles attached to the old plasterboard came out easily the one attached to the masonry wall are slowing me down terribly. I don't own a hammer drill, buying one for such small work it's not worthy. I have already remove 2 of 3 sides of the shower that were tiled so almost there, but it has been very tough
 

bof

Well-Known Member
In theory, no. The flexible plastic concertina pipe is the problem, creates a small amount of heat, thence condensation in attic, catches and collects fluff, reduces draw of fan massively. Often thrown into the loft by the builder, overlong, kinks/blocks, you name it.
If you are refitting a bathroom you might as well fit a through wall or with a short hard plastic smooth wall pipe.
How does a sealed pipe collect fluff
We're talking diy , all taped and vented outside is perfectly adequate , insulate the pipe would improve any condensation issues but for perhaps two drips a half hour run on a cold winters morning which will cause no problems as it will evaporate
The alternative of up a ladder outside cutting hole for wall mounted may be a bit ott for diy
 
A flexible pipe is going from the ceiling (although like I said, it's not well attached) then to a in-line extractor and then from the extractor there's another flexible pipe going into the external part of the roof.

It does looks powerful I think it just needs new pipes.

I'll surely share the picture, today we started demolishing the en-suite, the tiles attached to the old plasterboard came out easily the one attached to the masonry wall are slowing me down terribly. I don't own a hammer drill, buying one for such small work it's not worthy. I have already remove 2 of 3 sides of the shower that were tiled so almost there, but it has been very tough
Try using a wallpaper steamer on the grouting, only hover it over the grout, this will make it a lot easier to remove.
 

Stevieo

Royal Spin Doctor
In theory, no. The flexible plastic concertina pipe is the problem, creates a small amount of heat, thence condensation in attic, catches and collects fluff, reduces draw of fan massively. Often thrown into the loft by the builder, overlong, kinks/blocks, you name it.
If you are refitting a bathroom you might as well fit a through wall or with a short hard plastic smooth wall pipe.
I had trouble with mine, pipe had a bend in it.

Condensation formed in it and ran back into the bend.

f**k**g stank.
 

Brimstone

Well-Known Member
How does a sealed pipe collect fluff
We're talking diy , all taped and vented outside is perfectly adequate , insulate the pipe would improve any condensation issues but for perhaps two drips a half hour run on a cold winters morning which will cause no problems as it will evaporate
The alternative of up a ladder outside cutting hole for wall mounted may be a bit ott for diy
Believe me it collects fluff/dust from the room quite quickly, Stevio has just given an example of the condensation issue.
I'm not saying it would not work, just it would be better if you are going to all that trouble for the rest of the room to fit a thru' wall fan - no need to drill outside - core drill it from inside, or stitch drill and repair if you don't have a coredrill.
 
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