niche problem involving wet plasterboard

pin3410

New Member
Hello everyone, I hope you don't mind me posting this question, I feel like I really need expert advice. I am a DIY beginner and have been helping out on my own self build, but a problem has cropped up and I would appreciate any advice.

The house is mainly built with natural materials so we are clay plastering downstairs. 2 weeks ago we put in a gyproc fireboard ceiling in line with building regs, and plastered with clay. The lead on this got us to use Baumit permeable primer on the plaster board as this is what they normally use with other substrates, but I am now concerned that we should have used a non-permeable primer. The house is pretty much airtight and after a few days it was staying very damp in there - we opened the windows for a bit to dry it out but it's been cold and not stopped raining, and (to my shame) life took over, we were busy with work and we did not ventilate or heat it adequately to get the plaster dry quickly. Within a few days one of the sheets of plasterboard got soggy and fell down. There is another area that is bowed and I think the whole ceiling needs to come down as the risk of damage is too great.

Two of the rooms which were completed early in the week have dried better and seem to have stayed flat, but knowing how damp it was in there last week is there a risk of damage to these areas too? I am concerned that a primer has been used which would allow moisture through to the plasterboard, and that the areas where boards have joined are also weak spots.

The lead on this seems to think the bits that have stayed up will dry out and be fine, but I am mistrustful of this view and if it all needs replacing I would sooner do it than regret it later. Is there a way to test a ceiling that looks fine to tell if the plasterboard has been compromised?

Before you answer, yes I know I am stupid so I am hoping not to be told that too much, and would appreciate any helpful comments :( Thank you
 

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Why did you apply clay to the fireboard? I would have tape jointed it. This is an American idea about coloured clay on the walls. There was a clay plaster specialist on this forum at one time, the last I knew of him he was trading in the Netherlands.
@ Danny may have an email address for him.
 
Hello everyone, I hope you don't mind me posting this question, I feel like I really need expert advice. I am a DIY beginner and have been helping out on my own self build, but a problem has cropped up and I would appreciate any advice.

The house is mainly built with natural materials so we are clay plastering downstairs. 2 weeks ago we put in a gyproc fireboard ceiling in line with building regs, and plastered with clay. The lead on this got us to use Baumit permeable primer on the plaster board as this is what they normally use with other substrates, but I am now concerned that we should have used a non-permeable primer. The house is pretty much airtight and after a few days it was staying very damp in there - we opened the windows for a bit to dry it out but it's been cold and not stopped raining, and (to my shame) life took over, we were busy with work and we did not ventilate or heat it adequately to get the plaster dry quickly. Within a few days one of the sheets of plasterboard got soggy and fell down. There is another area that is bowed and I think the whole ceiling needs to come down as the risk of damage is too great.

Two of the rooms which were completed early in the week have dried better and seem to have stayed flat, but knowing how damp it was in there last week is there a risk of damage to these areas too? I am concerned that a primer has been used which would allow moisture through to the plasterboard, and that the areas where boards have joined are also weak spots.

The lead on this seems to think the bits that have stayed up will dry out and be fine, but I am mistrustful of this view and if it all needs replacing I would sooner do it than regret it later. Is there a way to test a ceiling that looks fine to tell if the plasterboard has been compromised?

Before you answer, yes I know I am stupid so I am hoping not to be told that too much, and would appreciate any helpful comments :( Thank you
Clay takes long to dry so the boards took up the moisture
 
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