Lime skim on listed building

I'm about to start work on a listed building where the interior walls and ceilings have been stripped of paper and apart from some minor repairs needed appear to be sound. The customer requires the place to be completely re-skimmed. Although I have experience in lime work, I have never skimmed over existing finished walls or ceilings before and we are not permitted to use any synthetic sealer or adhesive. My question is; apart from simply wetting down and mechanically scratching (danger of causing damage) what can I do to inhibit suction and provide a key to the existing walls/ceilings prior to applying the first tight coat? Will painting with a weak wash made from CLM66 then applying the first coat while still damp do the trick? We will be using CLM66 (2 to 1 silica sand / mature putty) for the re-skimming
Thanks in advance for any advice.
 
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The Hobo

Well-Known Member
I'm about to start work on a listed building where the interior walls and ceilings have been stripped of paper and apart from some minor repairs needed appear to be sound. The customer requires the place to be completely re-skimmed. Although I have experience in lime work, I have never skimmed over existing finished walls or ceilings before and we are not permitted to use any synthetic sealer or adhesive. My question is; apart from simply wetting down and mechanically scratching (danger of causing damage) what can I do to inhibit suction and provide a key to the existing walls/ceilings prior to applying the first tight coat? Will painting with a weak wash made from CLM66 then applying the first coat while still damp do the trick? We will be using CLM66 (2 to 1 silica sand / mature putty) for the re-skimming
Thanks in advance for any advice.
if I where you I would walk away /if as good as yousay a bit of filler would do it/
 

Bagrat

Active Member
I'm about to start work on a listed building where the interior walls and ceilings have been stripped of paper and apart from some minor repairs needed appear to be sound. The customer requires the place to be completely re-skimmed. Although I have experience in lime work, I have never skimmed over existing finished walls or ceilings before and we are not permitted to use any synthetic sealer or adhesive. My question is; apart from simply wetting down and mechanically scratching (danger of causing damage) what can I do to inhibit suction and provide a key to the existing walls/ceilings prior to applying the first tight coat? Will painting with a weak wash made from CLM66 then applying the first coat while still damp do the trick? We will be using CLM66 (2 to 1 silica sand / mature putty) for the re-skimming
Thanks in advance for any advice.
There’s a product called r27 or something similar you can use
 

Stevieo

Royal Spin Doctor
I'm about to start work on a listed building where the interior walls and ceilings have been stripped of paper and apart from some minor repairs needed appear to be sound. The customer requires the place to be completely re-skimmed. Although I have experience in lime work, I have never skimmed over existing finished walls or ceilings before and we are not permitted to use any synthetic sealer or adhesive. My question is; apart from simply wetting down and mechanically scratching (danger of causing damage) what can I do to inhibit suction and provide a key to the existing walls/ceilings prior to applying the first tight coat? Will painting with a weak wash made from CLM66 then applying the first coat while still damp do the trick? We will be using CLM66 (2 to 1 silica sand / mature putty) for the re-skimming
Thanks in advance for any advice.
Put PVA in bucket in van. Come out of van and announce that you have a nice white bucket of lime wash.

Skim wall.

Job's a good un.
 
I’m sure someone will correct me if I’m wrong but think that means you can use your average materials on the inside. It’s the outside you have to watch out for.
Yeah, using PVA on ceilings and partition walls now, it's the exterior window walls that I'm bothered about. We're going for a painted on slurry made from the mix I'm using - wet down first then skim when tacky.

Thanks everyone who replied, good info for the future.:)
 
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