Interesting BG conversation

reeves1985

Well-Known Member
Got a call this morning regarding the pure finish .

Apparently they're sending out samples blah blah. New product this that and rest of it.

Well as some of you may know it's not new and I've used a lot of it over the last 18 months.

It's great stuff but too expensive.

Anyway long story short after speaking for a few minutes and making it known I've used a lot of it.

The conversation quickly turned from free samples to product feedback.

So my feedback.
Great product, nice to use just too expensive to be viable.

Couldn't believe what came next.

Your not putting it on walls and ceilings are you?

WTF
Obviously I am love yes as I don't know of any other place you would use it quite sarcastically.

So apparently your only supposed to use it on ceilings now. "To make it more cost effective"

So the conversation went along the lines of if your trying to market this product now for use only on ceilings to make it a cost viable option you've not got a cat in hells chance.

Commercially on large buildings maybe but if I'm doing Mrs Jones bedroom 4x4, 5x4 etc then I ain't just putting a ceiling on I'd end up out of business.

Oh well that's what it is for.

It got me intrigued with it again so I scoured the internet and the white book while apprentice was prepping up.

The woman made me feel stupid on the phone by saying your only supposed to use it on ceilings.
I can't find 1 bit of spec or literature that specifies
Use only on ceiling areas.

How can a company get it so so wrong.

Who the f**k in their right mind is going to use 1 version of skim on ceilings and another on the walls.

I think they realise they've got a problem with the price of the product as it's just not a viable option whilst you can go and pick up a bag of multi or board finish
 

reeves1985

Well-Known Member
Never used the stuff myself. Cant see it taking off house bashing tbh
It won't at the price point.

It a good stuff it's just too expensive

But by changing the sales pitch to just put it on a ceiling is just making it worse. As no spreads going to do that
 

choppa

Well-Known Member
Got a call this morning regarding the pure finish .

Apparently they're sending out samples blah blah. New product this that and rest of it.

Well as some of you may know it's not new and I've used a lot of it over the last 18 months.

It's great stuff but too expensive.

Anyway long story short after speaking for a few minutes and making it known I've used a lot of it.

The conversation quickly turned from free samples to product feedback.

So my feedback.
Great product, nice to use just too expensive to be viable.

Couldn't believe what came next.

Your not putting it on walls and ceilings are you?

WTF
Obviously I am love yes as I don't know of any other place you would use it quite sarcastically.

So apparently your only supposed to use it on ceilings now. "To make it more cost effective"

So the conversation went along the lines of if your trying to market this product now for use only on ceilings to make it a cost viable option you've not got a cat in hells chance.

Commercially on large buildings maybe but if I'm doing Mrs Jones bedroom 4x4, 5x4 etc then I ain't just putting a ceiling on I'd end up out of business.

Oh well that's what it is for.

It got me intrigued with it again so I scoured the internet and the white book while apprentice was prepping up.

The woman made me feel stupid on the phone by saying your only supposed to use it on ceilings.
I can't find 1 bit of spec or literature that specifies
Use only on ceiling areas.

How can a company get it so so wrong.

Who the f**k in their right mind is going to use 1 version of skim on ceilings and another on the walls.

I think they realise they've got a problem with the price of the product as it's just not a viable option whilst you can go and pick up a bag of multi or board finish
£6 in bnq near me Gary dropped me some off to give my feed back I said it’s no different
 

reeves1985

Well-Known Member
£6 in bnq near me Gary dropped me some off to give my feed back I said it’s no different
Yeah they've reduced it as they're stopping stocking it as was all going out of date nobody was buying it at original price.

It finishes better than normal stuff and it dries uniformly

Other than that though there's not much else
 

Robbo123

Well-Known Member
It won't at the price point.

It a good stuff it's just too expensive

But by changing the sales pitch to just put it on a ceiling is just making it worse. As no spreads going to do that
It's not exactly crazy money? Can get a pallet of 56 bags of it for around £400 including vat
 

Robbo123

Well-Known Member
from where
Well you've been rude in not telling you now ha. Even if it was £9 a bag though it's hardly a price point that is going to scare people off? £2 extra a bag for a higher quality product, so less than a tenner extra for a big double bedroom
 

essexandy

The Lake Governor
It won't at the price point.

It a good stuff it's just too expensive

But by changing the sales pitch to just put it on a ceiling is just making it worse. As no spreads going to do that
To be fair that is exactly what happened on most jobs when I started. A stack of Thistle Board Finish for the ceilings and one of Sirapite for the walls.
 

reeves1985

Well-Known Member
Well cheapest I can get it readily is £10 a bag on a pallet £560

I get multi for £4.27 So £240

Big difference if you ask me!!

And before anyone asks that price on multi is from jewsons
 

reeves1985

Well-Known Member
To be fair that is exactly what happened on most jobs when I started. A stack of Thistle Board Finish for the ceilings and one of Sirapite for the walls.
The rates were better then!

Imagine doing it on site now at £3.5m2

The Point I was trying to make really wasn't about cost as such it was more that BG completely changed their approach to it by now trying to sell it as a just for a certain area product
 

The Apprentice

Active Member
You can use it on the ceilings, you can use it on the walls, the minimum requirement is to use it on the footprint of the building ie the ceilings.
So Mrs Jones I can do you ceiling for x using ordinary plaster or I can do your ceiling that’s going to be healthier for you and your family for x + £40 if you want it. I’ll let you do the maths.
@ZombieLoveYouToTheMoonAndBack
 

John j

Mono Don
You can use it on the ceilings, you can use it on the walls, the minimum requirement is to use it on the footprint of the building ie the ceilings.
So Mrs Jones I can do you ceiling for x using ordinary plaster or I can do your ceiling that’s going to be healthier for you and your family for x + £40 if you want it. I’ll let you do the maths.
@ZombieLoveYouToTheMoonAndBack
Get ye claws of my @zombie

In all fairness if i went in to a job in yorkshire with that sales pitch i can promise you they will go for cheaper option.
Plus how does it breath through paint.
Oh and any chance you can hook me up with another wooley gypsum hat i.ve left mine some where and cant remember
 

imago

Private Member
Emulsion is breathable it’s the silks that arent
You have to be clear and explain very slowly on this site.... :D
Indeed you do, so I will, because clearly you can't be bothered reading for yourself. (y)

Emulsion isn't breathable in practical terms, it allows a degree of moisture to pass through which makes it breathable in marketing terms. For a paint to be breathable in reality it needs to have been tested and have an SD value. None of the emulsion paints available at the sheds have an SD value, yet many state they're breathable. That's because technically they are in that some moisture will pass through, but in practical terms they aren't.

There are many articles available on the subject, and quite a few explain slowly, so have a read.
 

lurpak

Artex Boy
Indeed you do, so I will, because clearly you can't be bothered reading for yourself. (y)

Emulsion isn't breathable in practical terms, it allows a degree of moisture to pass through which makes it breathable in marketing terms. For a paint to be breathable in reality it needs to have been tested and have an SD value. None of the emulsion paints available at the sheds have an SD value, yet many state they're breathable. That's because technically they are in that some moisture will pass through, but in practical terms they aren't.

There are many articles available on the subject, and quite a few explain slowly, so have a read.
 

Robbo123

Well-Known Member
Indeed you do, so I will, because clearly you can't be bothered reading for yourself. (y)

Emulsion isn't breathable in practical terms, it allows a degree of moisture to pass through which makes it breathable in marketing terms. For a paint to be breathable in reality it needs to have been tested and have an SD value. None of the emulsion paints available at the sheds have an SD value, yet many state they're breathable. That's because technically they are in that some moisture will pass through, but in practical terms they aren't.

There are many articles available on the subject, and quite a few explain slowly, so have a read.
Yes emulsion paints are going to form an impenetrable barrier to microscopic particles...
I think you're probably confusing breathable in this sense to breathable in terms of painting over a lime render for example to allow moisture to escape. Completely different things. But good try on the input (y)
 

imago

Private Member
Yes emulsion paints are going to form an impenetrable barrier to microscopic particles...
I think you're probably confusing breathable in this sense to breathable in terms of painting over a lime render for example to allow moisture to escape. Completely different things. But good try on the input (y)
:LOL: OK, maybe it was a little advanced for you. You're straying from swallowing marketing hype, to nonsense.

You seem to be struggling with the concept, they're in no way different. A permeable coating is, well, permeable. If you want air, moisture or anything else to move between the atmosphere and the surface below paint, the paint must be permeable. To be classed as permeable it must be tested to show that will happen, and to what degree.

From a technical (i.e. actual quantifiable facts) point there's no such thing as 'breathability'. What you/they/we are talking about should be described as permeability. There is a test standard to determine what and how much permeates a material (paint in this case) and that's given a value. The emulsion paints available from DIY sheds don't have a value. They are able to be classed as 'breathable' because they will allow moisture to move out from a drying surface below. Often referred to as 'trade paint'.
 

Robbo123

Well-Known Member
:LOL: OK, maybe it was a little advanced for you. You're straying from swallowing marketing hype, to nonsense.

You seem to be struggling with the concept, they're in no way different. A permeable coating is, well, permeable. If you want air, moisture or anything else to move between the atmosphere and the surface below paint, the paint must be permeable. To be classed as permeable it must be tested to show that will happen, and to what degree.

From a technical (i.e. actual quantifiable facts) point there's no such thing as 'breathability'. What you/they/we are talking about should be described as permeability. There is a test standard to determine what and how much permeates a material (paint in this case) and that's given a value. The emulsion paints available from DIY sheds don't have a value. They are able to be classed as 'breathable' because they will allow moisture to move out from a drying surface below. Often referred to as 'trade paint'.
So they're breathable.... if hydrogen and oxygen can pass through them then so can VOCs. Thanks for clarifying
 

johniosaif

Private Member
Pure is nice gear , a room only needs 25 percent of it to be pure hence the ceiling is done in pure , emulsion is ok to use say BG .
 
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