Insulating plasters

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Sam W

New Member
I've spent the last few days knocking cement render off the bottom half of our dining room walls. House was built in 1860 and is stone walled with rubble fill.

I'm going to replaster with NHL based product. Additional insulation would be great, but I've not got the depth to fit wood wool boards or similar, so looking at insulating plasters. Questions:

- Does anyone have first hand experience of l*m*-g***n Ultra vs Cornerstone Insulating Render? Product descriptions are similar, but the Cornerstone is a lot cheaper. Keen to understand if that's because corners have been cut.

- Also looking at EcoCork plaster, but one of the walls is always going to be damp (ground level outside is higher than inside. Zero chance of getting this changed in the near future). Any first hand experience of how the cork copes with constant damp? I know it's fine in wine bottles etc., but at the end of the day it's stilll wood and I can't help feeling problems may arise.

All comments very welcome
 

John j

Mono Don
I've spent the last few days knocking cement render off the bottom half of our dining room walls. House was built in 1860 and is stone walled with rubble fill.

I'm going to replaster with NHL based product. Additional insulation would be great, but I've not got the depth to fit wood wool boards or similar, so looking at insulating plasters. Questions:

- Does anyone have first hand experience of l*m*-g***n Ultra vs Cornerstone Insulating Render? Product descriptions are similar, but the Cornerstone is a lot cheaper. Keen to understand if that's because corners have been cut.

- Also looking at EcoCork plaster, but one of the walls is always going to be damp (ground level outside is higher than inside. Zero chance of getting this changed in the near future). Any first hand experience of how the cork copes with constant damp? I know it's fine in wine bottles etc., but at the end of the day it's stilll wood and I can't help feeling problems may arise.

All comments very welcome
Can't ye pin some membrane on and dot n dab
 

Sam W

New Member
Can't ye pin some membrane on and dot n dab
I don't want to put a waterproof membrane in, the main point of this work is to return the walls to a breathable state, which is why we're using NHL based plaster. Existing architrave on windows and doors means I can't build the wall out more than about 50mm max, but in some places where the stone sticks out further, might only have 20mm of depth, so adding any type of (breathable) board is tricky.
 

malc

TPF Special Forces
The wall below ground level needs to have a tanking system fitted.
The other walls I would use Tarmac Limelite renovation plaster with a limelite high impact finish plaster.
I have used the Eco Cork plaster but not in damp conditions.
 

Sam W

New Member
The wall below ground level needs to have a tanking system fitted.
The other walls I would use Tarmac Limelite renovation plaster with a limelite high impact finish plaster.
I have used the Eco Cork plaster but not in damp conditions.
Thanks. Can see the sense in that. Would you put the tanking just up to the point where it's level with outside ground (about 25cm above internal floor level), or higher?
 

malc

TPF Special Forces
Thanks. Can see the sense in that. Would you put the tanking just up to the point where it's level with outside ground (about 25cm above internal floor level), or higher?
I would go higher . A damp proof company would recommend a metre to 1200 above floor level.
 

Tinytom

Well-Known Member
I've spent the last few days knocking cement render off the bottom half of our dining room walls. House was built in 1860 and is stone walled with rubble fill.

I'm going to replaster with NHL based product. Additional insulation would be great, but I've not got the depth to fit wood wool boards or similar, so looking at insulating plasters. Questions:

- Does anyone have first hand experience of l*m*-g***n Ultra vs Cornerstone Insulating Render? Product descriptions are similar, but the Cornerstone is a lot cheaper. Keen to understand if that's because corners have been cut.

- Also looking at EcoCork plaster, but one of the walls is always going to be damp (ground level outside is higher than inside. Zero chance of getting this changed in the near future). Any first hand experience of how the cork copes with constant damp? I know it's fine in wine bottles etc., but at the end of the day it's stilll wood and I can't help feeling problems may arise.

All comments very welcome
I did a massive job using like green ultra, one full elevation of a farm house
I thought it was amazing, like spreading cotton wool it was really light, the fibres gave it good body and it stuck easily to loose sandstone, where anything else would have fallen off, the top coat is really difficult to get any sort of finish on though but the farmers love that look so it worked out well in the end
 
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