Gyproc Cement Joint Compound on plastered walls

tlogic

New Member
Hi

I recently stripped of the wallpaper in my hallway and used gyproc readymix joint cement to go over the walls to give it a nice smooth textured surface prior to painting. The walls were rubbed down and pva once the wallpaper was removed prior to applying the joint cement compound.

A few questions if you don't mind answering.

1)How long does this stuff normally take to dry?

2) After applying the second coat I'm noticing quite a few hairline cracks appearing most probably due to shrinkgae, what the best way to fill the cracks?

3) What grade sandpaper should I use to rub this down prior to painting?

I decided to use this because I know someone else who used it and their walls felt very smooth and textured which is the type of finish I'm trying to acheive, but if it goes tits up due to shrinkage would it be ok to apply 2 coats of multi finish on top of it?

Currently tbh my walls looks abit of a mess so I've ordered a wall sander to be delivered so I can rub it down.

Any advice will be much appreciated.

Thanks

Here is what I used
 

MakeItSmooth

Well-Known Member
a nice smooth textured surface

and their walls felt very smooth and textured

Well, which is it?

Is it smooth

Or is it textured

??



I love a bit of smooth Artex, me...



In answer to your question, 180-220 grit is quite commonly used when sanding joint compound prior to decorating (for gods sake DON'T even THINK about trying to electric sand joint compound without proper dust extraction!! - AND a decent silicone face mask that seals properly to your face - e.g. 3M 4251 or similar), but I suggest you get your wall(s) plastered properly, with multi-finish. Air-drying joint compound will tend to shrink (as you've already begun to notice). Multi-skim wont shrink, and applied properly, by someone who knows what they're doing, won't need sanding. It will also be harder/more resilient than white gypsum joint compound.
 
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tlogic

New Member
Well, which is it?

Is it smooth

Or is it textured

??



I love a bit of smooth Artex, me...



In answer to your question, 180-220 grit is quite commonly used when sanding joint compound prior to decorating (for gods sake DON'T even THINK about trying to electric sand joint compound without proper dust extraction!! - AND a decent silicone face mask that seals properly to your face - e.g. 3M 4251 or similar), but I suggest you get your wall(s) plastered properly, with multi-finish. Air-drying joint compound will tend to shrink (as you've already begun to notice). Multi-skim wont shrink, and applied properly, by someone who knows what they're doing, won't need sanding. It will also be harder/more resilient than white gypsum joint compound.
thanks Makelt, expensive mistake I've made but hey you only learn.I think I'll get it skimmed
 
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