Green grit

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Been asked to quote for a job multiple ceilings in a house but has been green gritted before hand.

As iv never used the stuff before will i need to/ can i pva over the top of it before i skim or will it still control the suction after a long time. I dont know how long its been on...
 

ChrispyUK

Well-Known Member
Been asked to quote for a job multiple ceilings in a house but has been green gritted before hand.

As iv never used the stuff before will i need to/ can i pva over the top of it before i skim or will it still control the suction after a long time. I dont know how long its been on...

hmmm. Unless it’s been put on really thickly, it won’t necessarily control the suction...but it’ll be a bit better. Depends what it’s gone over.
 

Monkey Boy

Well-Known Member
imo it will still be a suction killer. If it is sound go straight on to it. I’ve gone over months old grit before
the grit part gives mechanical key because the chemical keying is all but destroyed
 

smoother09

Well-Known Member
Just quote the job at the high end of the estimate and you'll soon find out on day 1 if you need to do anything.
 

essexandy

The Lake Governor
If I were you I'd make it absolutely clear, in writing, that you can take no responsibility for any adhesive failure.
If the grit isn't going to do what's required there's absolutely nothing you can do now to rectify the situation. I sure as hell wouldn't be putting more adhesive over the top of it.
 

essexandy

The Lake Governor
You definitely can’t accept any responsibility for prep that you haven’t done yourself. I know there’s a lot of chancers out there that let customers or builders do their preparation work. I personally don’t let anyone prep for me.
Apart from stripping wallpaper, I'll always try to get someone else to do that.
 

windy

Private Member
If I were you I'd make it absolutely clear, in writing, that you can take no responsibility for any adhesive failure.
If the grit isn't going to do what's required there's absolutely nothing you can do now to rectify the situation. I sure as hell wouldn't be putting more adhesive over the top of it.
You and I both know that won't stand up in court. Your the competent person.if it's in doubt it should be re boarded.

Ps I'd just sheet up and take my chances
 

John j

Mono Don
imo it will still be a suction killer. If it is sound go straight on to it. I’ve gone over months old grit before
the grit part gives mechanical key because the chemical keying is all but destroyed
Just gone over some that had been on over a week. Hung like f**k
 
So you lot think itl be ok to go straight over? Just not wanting it to set like a mofo and chasing my arse the whole day

Told them i was taking no responsibility if it fails, and they agreed to this.
 

Stewie03

Well-Known Member
So you lot think itl be ok to go straight over? Just not wanting it to set like a mofo and chasing my arse the whole day

Told them i was taking no responsibility if it fails, and they agreed to this.
I doubt it will pull in rapidly these grits keep suction down,just skim the smallest ceiling and see what the timings are like
 

windy

Private Member
So you lot think itl be ok to go straight over? Just not wanting it to set like a mofo and chasing my arse the whole day

Told them i was taking no responsibility if it fails, and they agreed to this.
It may be just saying legally.you can't hide behind the im not taking responsibility for f**k ups if it goes wrong clause
 

MakeItSmooth

Well-Known Member
Been asked to quote for a job multiple ceilings in a house but has been green gritted before hand.

As iv never used the stuff before will i need to/ can i pva over the top of it before i skim or will it still control the suction after a long time. I dont know how long its been on...

If it's green, then I'd guess it's probably Bostik:


Can't add much to what's already been said - only thing I'd add is it might be worth contacting Bostik and asking them your question. I'm wondering if it might be OK to prime it a 2nd time with the same stuff.

Whatever Bostik say, I'd still make it crystal clear to the customer that it's at their risk.
 

superspread

Well-Known Member
If it's green, then I'd guess it's probably Bostik:


Can't add much to what's already been said - only thing I'd add is it might be worth contacting Bostik and asking them your question. I'm wondering if it might be OK to prime it a 2nd time with the same stuff.

Whatever Bostik say, I'd still make it crystal clear to the customer that it's at their risk.
Or thistle bond it
 

Retired Spread

Well-Known Member
So you lot think itl be ok to go straight over? Just not wanting it to set like a mofo and chasing my arse the whole day

Told them i was taking no responsibility if it fails, and they agreed to this.
should be fine

chances are it's been gritted over paint to give mechanical key (which is how it should be done to BG specs) so I reckon there'll be virtually no suction.
 

windy

Private Member
I think you can, provided you tell them the proper way is to reboard or replace, and they have made a choice understanding the risk.
Lots of past examples been to court and lost trying to argue this. Customer will play soft and younwill be deemed the professional to donthe right thing in a customers house ...or walk away
 

The Apprentice

Well-Known Member
Lots of past examples been to court and lost trying to argue this. Customer will play soft and younwill be deemed the professional to donthe right thing in a customers house ...or walk away
If it’s in writing, be that text or email that you have advised them the correct way of doing it i.e. overboard etc and they choose the cheaper option it will stand up in court.
Admin is not our strong point but if you use a disclaimer, which each and every of us should use, the liability lies solely with the customer.
 

windy

Private Member
If it’s in writing, be that text or email that you have advised them the correct way of doing it i.e. overboard etc and they choose the cheaper option it will stand up in court.
Admin is not our strong point but if you use a disclaimer, which each and every of us should use, the liability lies solely with the customer.
So spark or gas engineer says that gas pipe or wiring is below standard but I'll do it below standard just because you want it a bit cheaper as long as you sign this form to say if it blows up or electrocutes someone I'm not liable ??
I know they are different trades but principle is the same as far as a court would be concerned
 

windy

Private Member

What is a disclaimer?​

Disclaimers are used to provide a warning to people visiting a premises or partaking in certain activities. They are designed to make sure that people are made aware of foreseeable risks of injury, or where responsibility will rest if items are lost, broken or stolen. Often when we take part in a potentially dangerous activity, the organiser will ask the participants to sign a disclaimer to confirm that they are aware of the risks the activity presents.

Many such disclaimers seem to indicate that the business or organiser can in no way be held liable if there is an injury as a result of the activity. We have all read the wording ‘the Management accept no responsibility for injury or loss of property’. However, the fact is that displaying a notice, or asking someone to sign a disclaimer, does not completely absolve a business or organisation from being held liable should someone end up suffering an injury or a loss. We’ve succeeded with many claims for compensation in such cases.

Reduction of risk, not responsibility​

Disclaimers should be seen in a good light when they are used correctly. Making sure that people appreciate certain activities are dangerous and that risks are understood is a good thing. We all want to reduce the risk of injury and see less accidents happening. When people know what the risks are, they are minded to act safely and follow instructions carefully. Even with obvious risks, we benefit from being reminded.

However, many businesses or organisations use disclaimers as a way of trying to absolve themselves of any responsibility for health and safety. The wording is aimed to discourage people from pursuing their right to seek compensation for any injury they sustain.

Disclaimer should only be seen as a warning to patrons or participants, rather than a prevention of any liability and used only to make sure that when the instructions in any signed disclaimer have been followed, the risk of injury should be minimised.

Negligence overrides any disclaimer​

If it’s in writing, be that text or email that you have advised them the correct way of doing it i.e. overboard etc and they choose the cheaper option it will stand up in court.
Admin is not our strong point but if you use a disclaimer, which each and every of us should use, the liability lies solely with the customer.
 

windy

Private Member

What is a disclaimer?​

Disclaimers are used to provide a warning to people visiting a premises or partaking in certain activities. They are designed to make sure that people are made aware of foreseeable risks of injury, or where responsibility will rest if items are lost, broken or stolen. Often when we take part in a potentially dangerous activity, the organiser will ask the participants to sign a disclaimer to confirm that they are aware of the risks the activity presents.

Many such disclaimers seem to indicate that the business or organiser can in no way be held liable if there is an injury as a result of the activity. We have all read the wording ‘the Management accept no responsibility for injury or loss of property’. However, the fact is that displaying a notice, or asking someone to sign a disclaimer, does not completely absolve a business or organisation from being held liable should someone end up suffering an injury or a loss. We’ve succeeded with many claims for compensation in such cases.

Reduction of risk, not responsibility​

Disclaimers should be seen in a good light when they are used correctly. Making sure that people appreciate certain activities are dangerous and that risks are understood is a good thing. We all want to reduce the risk of injury and see less accidents happening. When people know what the risks are, they are minded to act safely and follow instructions carefully. Even with obvious risks, we benefit from being reminded.

However, many businesses or organisations use disclaimers as a way of trying to absolve themselves of any responsibility for health and safety. The wording is aimed to discourage people from pursuing their right to seek compensation for any injury they sustain.

Disclaimer should only be seen as a warning to patrons or participants, rather than a prevention of any liability and used only to make sure that when the instructions in any signed disclaimer have been followed, the risk of injury should be minimised.

Negligence overrides any disclaimer​

Written by a lawyer,not a spread
 

leefaithfull

Well-Known Member
dont do it,,it,ll only cause you stress,,worry, why bother,,pack ya gingham hankercheif on the old bamboo stick and whisle off into the sunset
 
D

Deleted member 46546

Guest
So spark or gas engineer says that gas pipe or wiring is below standard but I'll do it below standard just because you want it a bit cheaper as long as you sign this form to say if it blows up or electrocutes someone I'm not liable ??
I know they are different trades but principle is the same as far as a court would be concerned
Completely different. Sparkies have to sign off everything they touch. If a fude board isn't up to the work they're doing etc they have to replace it
 

Brimstone

Well-Known Member
Written by a lawyer,not a spread
There is no defence for negligence, or sub-standard work where there is a standard. However, once it is above standard and you have taken all reasonable care to explain the differences between say, two different options, and/or you tell them you don't know if it will work and the implications of that, then the customer is making a choice. It is not for the tradesman to insist on only one way or not all all.

Yesterday we failed to get a liner down a chimney. I had explained why this could happen and offered an alternative solution. They declined the alternative, and would have preferred a different system I do not not offer. They then made a choice to take the risk rather than wait for the alternative installer. It jammed, after several different attempts, and I was willing to try again. I have used my very best efforts to complete the work. The client decided to bail and accept the loss. I expect to get paid, less whatever I can recover for the client by returning the un-used parts.

So, how would you now advise the client?
 

leefaithfull

Well-Known Member
There is no defence for negligence, or sub-standard work where there is a standard. However, once it is above standard and you have taken all reasonable care to explain the differences between say, two different options, and/or you tell them you don't know if it will work and the implications of that, then the customer is making a choice. It is not for the tradesman to insist on only one way or not all all.

Yesterday we failed to get a liner down a chimney. I had explained why this could happen and offered an alternative solution. They declined the alternative, and would have preferred a different system I do not not offer. They then made a choice to take the risk rather than wait for the alternative installer. It jammed, after several different attempts, and I was willing to try again. I have used my very best efforts to complete the work. The client decided to bail and accept the loss. I expect to get paid, less whatever I can recover for the client by returning the un-used parts.

So, how would you now advise the client?
i would advise said client to open a window when lighting a fire,,then point to something behind them with horror on ya face and run like f**k to ur van ,,get home crack a tinny roll a fat one n change ya number
 

Brimstone

Well-Known Member
Tempting solution that, but my work is based on reputation and connections. Although my client is the contracted maintenance/interior design consultant, the home belongs to a super wealthy Yank family. I doubt they would even notice the cost of an expensive law firm harassing me for the rest of my life.
 

leefaithfull

Well-Known Member
Tempting solution that, but my work is based on reputation and connections. Although my client is the contracted maintenance/interior design consultant, the home belongs to a super wealthy Yank family. I doubt they would even notice the cost of an expensive law firm harassing me for the rest of my life.
act dumb and let the wealthy fat c**ts come up with some kind of solution,,they love that the useless c**ts
 
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