Dot and Dab plasterboard before tiling

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ARLester

New Member
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advice needed please

I’m having a bathroom refurb and as you can see from the images attached, within minutes of the old tiles being removed, it’s obvious the old plaster underneath will follow suit. Would you suggest removing all the tiles and the remaining (if any) plaster and then dot and dab plasterboard to refinish? Or any other suggestions. Large 120x60 porcelain tiles going up so a fair amount of weight hanging off the plasterboard. What’s everyone’s ideas to the best approach please. I’d ideally like to go with the dot and dab plasterboard technique for speed but this is my own house so don’t want a bodge job.
 

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Damian plasterer

Well-Known Member
View attachment 64280 advice needed please

I’m having a bathroom refurb and as you can see from the images attached, within minutes of the old tiles being removed, it’s obvious the old plaster underneath will follow suit. Would you suggest removing all the tiles and the remaining (if any) plaster and then dot and dab plasterboard to refinish? Or any other suggestions. Large 120x60 porcelain tiles going up so a fair amount of weight hanging off the plasterboard. What’s everyone’s ideas to the best approach please. I’d ideally like to go with the dot and dab plasterboard technique for speed but this is my own house so don’t want a bodge job.
Dog and dab moisture boards will be fine use plenty of adhesive. If not get it floated out if you can find anyone capable. We used to do bathrooms in limelite many years ago but them days are gone
 

Tinytom

Well-Known Member
Any reason you’d steer away from dob and dab the boards into the brickwork ??
Yeah, a few reasons
First it looks like a solid wall, so your dabs have the potential to pull moisture through from outside.
your having large format heavy tiles so your relying on the chemical bond of the d&d, no mechanical fixings
Bathrooms a humid environment and the dabs will be cold points in the wall, forming dew points which could lead to mouldy boards
I’d lat the walls using roofing battens
Insulate between the lats, then insulation backed plasterboard but only thin so you don’t loose too much room. Of course that’s my opinion there’s always more than 1 way to skin a cat and never only just 1 correct method
 

ChrispyUK

Well-Known Member
Any reason you’d steer away from dob and dab the boards into the brickwork ??

Think Tom has covered it. I do lots of bathrooms, and on these older properties, the one problem they nearly always have is mould due to condensation forming on cold walls and ceilings. Last one I did, I gutted it back to brick, pulled the lath and plaster ceiling down, battened and insulated walks and ceilings, backer board around the bath/shower etc. After a kitchen, bathroom is probably 2nd biggest investment so why cut corners. You’re also more likely to get the walls flatter using battens, especially important with large format tiles. You’ll potentially regret not insulating it, with large areas of cold tiles.
 

essexandy

The Lake Governor
Think Tom has covered it. I do lots of bathrooms, and on these older properties, the one problem they nearly always have is mould due to condensation forming on cold walls and ceilings. Last one I did, I gutted it back to brick, pulled the lath and plaster ceiling down, battened and insulated walks and ceilings, backer board around the bath/shower etc. After a kitchen, bathroom is probably 2nd biggest investment so why cut corners. You’re also more likely to get the walls flatter using battens, especially important with large format tiles. You’ll potentially regret not insulating it, with large areas of cold tiles.
This is all very interesting, but what make of foam would you recommend?
 
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