Damp proofing over the top ?

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CTPlastering

Well-Known Member
Sorry for the thread title some people maye think it ment otherwise ...... We are currently doing a damp proofing job for a maintenance company who are on there last job before accedation or how ever u spell it for sovereign. This job in a internal wall and fire place and alcoves , hack off to 1.5m and inject which was done by the maintenance company , we have to sbr slurry the brickwork , render with sbr included 2 coats , k11 slurry on top of that . Then minimum 10mm renovating plaster by sovereign .... Then skim ..... Is this abit over the top for a living room ?!??!?!? It wasnt as if the walls were soaking wet ..... And its not a basement ....... Any thought would be good lads , i think sovereign r having a good laugh at this bloke ......
 

brimplas1

Well-Known Member
I agree, I would only tank if next doors chimney is back to back and is full of rubble and has a good chance of bridging the injection. ...
 

CTPlastering

Well-Known Member
No the fire place seemed dry from what i have seen , the spec some how managed to stop 10cm off both sides of the fire place , no external wall getting done just the one between front and back room ..... Defo just a money maker for sovereign then ...... Its not my job im just putting on the wall what im told to ..... Its as if its a basement the way its going lol
 

CTPlastering

Well-Known Member
It just seems over the top thats all and fancied hearing your opinions :RpS_thumbsup: just feels as if wu trying to make a dam or something .... Lol
 

dplast

Member
Chimneys are grey areas where damp company's are involved most will not give guarantees on them because of the soot contamination on the brick work. Usually we just tank with slurry then wash plastering sand 2 coat leave for a week and skim.
 

CTPlastering

Well-Known Member
Always used washed plastering sand /cement ,4/1with additive ,never had a problem

Its all i have done in the past , used dry zone to inject then renderguard .... Its why i think its abit ott this job am on , must of cost the poor old fella a fortune for the gear like .....
 

D4mp

New Member
Hello

It could sound ott, we always tank the chimney breast with s dpc because of the contamination issue, and also because of the crap that gets chucked in. Also it's hard to completely isolate from next door also if they have lots of infill. Another thing to remember with salts inside the chimney is not only are they hygroscopic, some become deliquescent @ 35% relative humidity, this means they will move and run.
 

CTPlastering

Well-Known Member
To be honest we tank the chimney stacks these days
Its mainly the wall between front room and back room .... One alcove and the 2 sides of the fire and 6 inches either side of the fire place front ..... Strange going to all this hassle , i can see damp appearing where we arnt doing .... Not my job though im just going through a maintenance company who are going through sovereign as ive said before i think lol
 

keithuk

Private Member
Its mainly the wall between front room and back room .... One alcove and the 2 sides of the fire and 6 inches either side of the fire place front ..... Strange going to all this hassle , i can see damp appearing where we arnt doing .... Not my job though im just going through a maintenance company who are going through sovereign as ive said before i think lol

Just do as they want mate ,but I see what your saying
 

Arti

Well-Known Member
Hello Arti

I have seen many a failure with limelite and renovating plasters.
I surveyed a property where the architect insisted the work had to be done with limelite. I informed him on the what I know about the failures of this product. I didn't price for the work in the end, even though it was a very big job.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/x1qbsgat41a5zhe/AAA-E1NA_UTe8dKXmu5Ju9H9a?dl=0

Ive never had a failure with it, ive never used S&C after a chemical injection for years due to it being a poor insulator and it sometimes leaingd to cold spots and condensation. I would think the wall you mentioned must have been almost saturated for the renovating to fail ? I might be wrong. I can only comment on my own experiences Marra :RpS_thumbup:
 

Fatarm

Trainee mod
Hello Arti

I have seen many a failure with limelite and renovating plasters.
I surveyed a property where the architect insisted the work had to be done with limelite. I informed him on the what I know about the failures of this product. I didn't price for the work in the end, even though it was a very big job.

https://www.dropbox.com/sh/x1qbsgat41a5zhe/AAA-E1NA_UTe8dKXmu5Ju9H9a?dl=0
Alreet ross.....how did the limelite fail???? What did the lab analysis show??? Was it the plaster or the prep.... treatment?
 

D4mp

New Member
Alreet ross.....how did the limelite fail???? What did the lab analysis show??? Was it the plaster or the prep.... treatment?

Alreet Fatarm

There was still free moisture (rising dampness) @ only 4% and 1% hygroscopic moisture content. Limelite will not stop the migration of salts like lime plaster, eventually if the conditions are correct it will fail.
I love lime plaster and it's one of main earns but it has its limitations like a damp proof course.
When drilling a dpc I never drill it to the spec, I will always drill another hole in the middle of the stretcher bond and if the walls are really wet I will drill another dpc above it.
I've just done a listed timber frame building with a rising dampness problem, the ground levels couldn't be reduced because there are no foundations and the conservation officer agreed to a dpc and lime.
 

D4mp

New Member
The building is on a sloped site and green sand. It is bent, twisted, cracked, and also has a basement. The structural engineer said don't alter the dynamics of the ground.
French drains are great if installed correctly, I haven't seen many installed correctly though. Most seem to make a moat around the foundations.
 

irish_spread

Private Member
Alreet Fatarm

There was still free moisture (rising dampness) @ only 4% and 1% hygroscopic moisture content. Limelite will not stop the migration of salts like lime plaster, eventually if the conditions are correct it will fail.
I love lime plaster and it's one of main earns but it has its limitations like a damp proof course.
When drilling a dpc I never drill it to the spec, I will always drill another hole in the middle of the stretcher bond and if the walls are really wet I will drill another dpc above it.
I've just done a listed timber frame building with a rising dampness problem, the ground levels couldn't be reduced because there are no foundations and the conservation officer agreed to a dpc and lime.

no offence intended @D4mp but for years all the rising damp sellers said rising damp rose thru capillaries in bricks, and therefore the bricks desperately needed to be injected, not the mortar joints.
Now IT seems, the rising damp sellers say the mortar joints need to be given an injection, the bricks are fine, I'm confused :confused:
 
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D4mp

New Member
no offence intended @D4mp but for years all the rising damp sellers said rising damp rose thru capillaries in bricks, and therefore the bricks desperately needed to be injected, not the mortar joints.
Now IT seems, the rising damp sellers say the mortar joints need to be given an injection, the bricks are fine, I'm confused :confused:

Hello

No offence taken.
We used to drill through the bricks and inject the mortar bed, people are confused with this as they see the holes in the bricks and presume that is what has been injected.
The mortar bed is the pathway for the rising dampness as well as the brick.
 

carlos

Private Member
The old spirit base chemical was injected at high pressure in to the bricks.

Water base chemical into the joint at low pressure, or transfusion.
 

irish_spread

Private Member
We were always told to drill halfway into the brick, to saturate it. NEVER bother with the mortar beds. Strange the way the damp selling companies change their minds eh :RpS_laugh:
 

D4mp

New Member
Some people think that a row of blues will stop rising damp, the mortar bed is still a pathway.
 

irish_spread

Private Member
It's the plaster that makes the damp rise lol. Any time served plasterer who understands dampness will know this
 

flynnyman

Well-Known Member
Rising damp hmmmmmm here we go again :) ok this is why I am not a millionaire but I'm considering spreading the myth and jumping on the bandwagon :) every job I look at I usually leave without the job I tell them to change certain lifestyle habits. Like I've said in the past you don't go on holiday and your house catches rising damp, something has changed. It could be as simple as a wet coat, wet dog, wet shoes, a sink full of water, a toilet seat left up ( don't mention this to the missus it gives them extra power) :), not emptying the bath, drying clothes on the rad, new windows and doors, new central heating, even a rewire with the wrong plaster, decorating with the wrong paint, blocking vents, replacing wooden floors with concrete, new roofs, removing chimneys, wall insulation, loft insulation, rendering and so on. The list is endless but if your not asking these questions you won't find the answer and yes it needs fixing but without sorting the problem it might come back. Most houses that suffer with damp problems are your typical terrace who originally had vents, wooden windows that would be open, outside toilets and no bathroom, no washers or driers, no felt or loft insulation, no wall insulation and so on and this has what's changed so cutting out a perfectly good DPC and adding a chemical one or even a membrane seems crazy. I've seen so many damp jobs that have been injected that needed re doing I'm pretty sure every damp job had been done previous and all you hear is it failed (you don't F*****g say). I'm not saying it doesn't need fixing but diagnose the problem first. Don't quote me on this but rising damp is let's say 30 years old? The country was infected around the 60/70's around the same time as walls ties came out and if you drill 30 holes onto the front of a terrace, I'm sure your gonna knock The back off the bricks causing a problem but more shocking is that about the same time we had a load of paddies come over so in theory its got to be the best con in the world :)
 

irish_spread

Private Member
Rising damp hmmmmmm here we go again :) ok this is why I am not a millionaire but I'm considering spreading the myth and jumping on the bandwagon :) every job I look at I usually leave without the job I tell them to change certain lifestyle habits. Like I've said in the past you don't go on holiday and your house catches rising damp, something has changed. It could be as simple as a wet coat, wet dog, wet shoes, a sink full of water, a toilet seat left up ( don't mention this to the missus it gives them extra power) :), not emptying the bath, drying clothes on the rad, new windows and doors, new central heating, even a rewire with the wrong plaster, decorating with the wrong paint, blocking vents, replacing wooden floors with concrete, new roofs, removing chimneys, wall insulation, loft insulation, rendering and so on. The list is endless but if your not asking these questions you won't find the answer and yes it needs fixing but without sorting the problem it might come back. Most houses that suffer with damp problems are your typical terrace who originally had vents, wooden windows that would be open, outside toilets and no bathroom, no washers or driers, no felt or loft insulation, no wall insulation and so on and this has what's changed so cutting out a perfectly good DPC and adding a chemical one or even a membrane seems crazy. I've seen so many damp jobs that have been injected that needed re doing I'm pretty sure every damp job had been done previous and all you hear is it failed (you don't F*****g say). I'm not saying it doesn't need fixing but diagnose the problem first. Don't quote me on this but rising damp is let's say 30 years old? The country was infected around the 60/70's around the same time as walls ties came out and if you drill 30 holes onto the front of a terrace, I'm sure your gonna knock The back off the bricks causing a problem but more shocking is that about the same time we had a load of paddies come over so in theory its got to be the best con in the world :)



Ah cmon now ,Ted, the money was only resting in my account . I'll post some pics on here tomorrow of a rising damp basement lol job I'm doing in the west end. Silly money for doing it according to damp specialist spec. One coat over granite, he's analysed it and it's rising through the granite he says , you can't make this stuff up. He's had the dampness analysed lol. The building must be worth £50 m , 7 stories :RpS_laugh:
 

D4mp

New Member
Ah cmon now ,Ted, the money was only resting in my account . I'll post some pics on here tomorrow of a rising damp basement lol job I'm doing in the west end. Silly money for doing it according to damp specialist spec. One coat over granite, he's analysed it and it's rising through the granite he says , you can't make this stuff up. He's had the dampness analysed lol. The building must be worth £50 m , 7 stories :RpS_laugh:

If you have the spec post the report.
 

flynnyman

Well-Known Member
Ah cmon now ,Ted, the money was only resting in my account . I'll post some pics on here tomorrow of a rising damp basement lol job I'm doing in the west end. Silly money for doing it according to damp specialist spec. One coat over granite, he's analysed it and it's rising through the granite he says , you can't make this stuff up. He's had the dampness analysed lol. The building must be worth £50 m , 7 stories :RpS_laugh:
Hes not been hanging anything out to dry has he ;)
 

irish_spread

Private Member
Builder got some ka tanking slurry, damp guru says not necessary cos it's rising damp. In a basement :RpS_w00t:
 
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