Before and after pics

blackdog

Active Member
Nice work. I wouldn't be putting my money on fibrous right now. I think you're going to see 3d printers make their mark in fibrous over the next few years. You'll take a image of the piece then the printer will make it up for you and you'll just piece it. It was a program on radio 4 and they were talking about how it will be used for bones and hips etc.

My cousin spent ten thousand on becoming an energy assessor with the HIPS scheme a few years back and they pulled the scheme while he was still training. He went on a downward spiral for a few years but has just landed a job at a spongebob car wash.
 

Danny

Administrator
Nice work. I wouldn't be putting my money on fibrous right now. I think you're going to see 3d printers make their mark in fibrous over the next few years. You'll take a image of the piece then the printer will make it up for you and you'll just piece it. It was a program on radio 4 and they were talking about how it will be used for bones and hips etc.

My cousin spent ten thousand on becoming an energy assessor with the HIPS scheme a few years back and they pulled the scheme while he was still training. He went on a downward spiral for a few years but has just landed a job at a spongebob car wash.
yeah I dont think 3d printing is good enough yet... but it is coming on leaps and bounds
 

flynnyman

Well-Known Member
They are printing a building in Dubai I think which is going to be massive and the building is for 3D printing.
 

raggles

Private Member
Nano technology will probably be economically viable in about 3 years time ish and then maybe not in our life time but not long after 3d printers will be obsolete.
 
Nice work. I wouldn't be putting my money on fibrous right now. I think you're going to see 3d printers make their mark in fibrous over the next few years. You'll take a image of the piece then the printer will make it up for you and you'll just piece it. It was a program on radio 4 and they were talking about how it will be used for bones and hips etc.

My cousin spent ten thousand on becoming an energy assessor with the HIPS scheme a few years back and they pulled the scheme while he was still training. He went on a downward spiral for a few years but has just landed a job at a spongebob car wash.
In new builds perhaps the cornice could be bought in as "3D printed" but you would still need someone to fit them unless you can do it yourself. A lot of our work is restoration and in listed buildings which require the cornice ran in-situ, manually on laths with lime, sand and hair. I think most of our customers also prefer traditional methods and original materials.
 

blackdog

Active Member
In new builds perhaps the cornice could be bought in as "3D printed" but you would still need someone to fit them unless you can do it yourself. A lot of our work is restoration and in listed buildings which require the cornice ran in-situ, manually on laths with lime, sand and hair. I think most of our customers also prefer traditional methods and original materials.
Sorry. I was just pulling your leg. It's real craftsmanship what you do. Job satisfaction.
 

Danny

Administrator
In new builds perhaps the cornice could be bought in as "3D printed" but you would still need someone to fit them unless you can do it yourself. A lot of our work is restoration and in listed buildings which require the cornice ran in-situ, manually on laths with lime, sand and hair. I think most of our customers also prefer traditional methods and original materials.
I would love to have a go at fibrous work... :D
 

mikeadams1985

Private Member
3d printing wont replace the trade.

All it will do is enable us to model something up on computer, print and edit it/scale etc easily instead of modelling in clay etc.
 

Zmcewen

New Member
nice job. It's nice to see people doing it the company I used to work with specialised in it haven't done it much lately though (used to hate making it though)
 
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