Achieving a solid colour when dry

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funkycarl

Active Member
It just seems there is no consisernt with multi half a wall needs different approach will that's who I find it lately then you see pics of scottie work and then I think what going on take my hat to spreads like that who bangs loads on and still that's that kind of finish
 
It just seems there is no consisernt with multi half a wall needs different approach will that's who I find it lately then you see pics of scottie work and then I think what going on take my hat to spreads like that who bangs loads on and still that's that kind of finish

unless we can make it from non natural products there is going to be an element of instability
 
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Deleted member 29624

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It just seems there is no consisernt with multi half a wall needs different approach will that's who I find it lately then you see pics of scottie work and then I think what going on take my hat to spreads like that who bangs loads on and still that's that kind of finish
Would imagine if you site bashing pretty consistantly on fresh board it would be easier to get a good solid finish all the time. My finish on board dont look like scotties but is pretty good and uniform I think i tcan just be a bit trickier on all the manky reskim substrates....did some walls on friday and after 3 coats of pva was still pulling pretty bad...i had to give it a fair bit of water near end and imagine that wont dry looking the best...was defenitely flat and smooth though so will paint up fine.
 

Builderboi

Well-Known Member
Would imagine if you site bashing pretty consistantly on fresh board it would be easier to get a good solid finish all the time. My finish on board dont look like scotties but is pretty good and uniform I think i tcan just be a bit trickier on all the manky reskim substrates....did some walls on friday and after 3 coats of pva was still pulling pretty bad...i had to give it a fair bit of water near end and imagine that wont dry looking the best...was defenitely flat and smooth though so will paint up fine.
Scotties spoilt in site that's what it is :lol:
 

Olican

Private Member
I have one trowel I've had from the start, I never cheated on anyone in my life! And now it's all over for us...

What kind of trowel do you use Jess, Beddy shared his famous breaking in technique which I have tried and it's a game changer, bought a new mt and had it worn in an hour.
 
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Deleted member 29624

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What kind of trowel do you use Jess, Beddy shared his famous breaking in technique which I have tried and it's a game changer, bought a new mt and had it worn in an hour.
What's the method mate? I'd like a nice spare for when the worst happens
 

Olican

Private Member
What's the method mate? I'd like a nice spare for when the worst happens

I use a very basic version of Beddys technique, he uses Japanese waterstones a set of 5 I think which are in decreasing levels of grade , a bit like this ..
ImageUploadedByThe Plasterers Forum1474312688.200938.jpg


I just have a master class whetstone but has worked well for me so here is my set up..
ImageUploadedByThe Plasterers Forum1474312791.929524.jpg


A whetstone, piece of smooth slate (preferably Welsh slate) and a barbers strop

Soak the stone until bubbles stop and sharpen the blade starting on the rougher side of stone then work it on the smooth side, then work it on the slate and finish on the strop ( a blob of chromium oxide will help here) whole set will cost about £20 and process will take about half an an hour to get a new trowel nicely worn in, if using a carbon Steel which will produce a sharper edge then soak in vinegar afterwards, this will create a forced patina and make the blade black stopping any orange rust. Thanks to @Hicky for the vinegar technique
 

Dropsalot

Private Member
I do roughly same using wet & dry paper and A flat tile. Wet the back of the wet n dry paper so it sticks to the tile, start with a rough say 200 grit and go down in grit size (up in numbers), 400, 600, and so on, you could go to 2000 grit if you want a really shiny, polished edge. For the strop I use a gash bit of leather with a dollop of chrome cleaner on it. When I get the trowel side sharp, I turn it upside down and gently strop of the resulting burr, careful now it's gonna be scary sharp!!
 
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Deleted member 29624

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I use a very basic version of Beddys technique, he uses Japanese waterstones a set of 5 I think which are in decreasing levels of grade , a bit like this ..
View attachment 13798

I just have a master class whetstone but has worked well for me so here is my set up..
View attachment 13799

A whetstone, piece of smooth slate (preferably Welsh slate) and a barbers strop

Soak the stone until bubbles stop and sharpen the blade starting on the rougher side of stone then work it on the smooth side, then work it on the slate and finish on the strop ( a blob of chromium oxide will help here) whole set will cost about £20 and process will take about half an an hour to get a new trowel nicely worn in, if using a carbon Steel which will produce a sharper edge then soak in vinegar afterwards, this will create a forced patina and make the blade black stopping any orange rust. Thanks to @Hicky for the vinegar technique
Cheers mate really good info and thanks @beddy as it comes from him...i got a new mt already so will get this stuff and give it the treatment(y)
 

Gibbo

Well-Known Member
Just get the trowel out an use it beddy is telling porkies i send him my worn in trowels
 
D

Deleted member 29624

Guest
Now im on the renders i'll break a new one in pretty quick anyway:whistle:
 
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