Yankee here. Need some advice

Tornadohunter

New Member
So I’m in the United States. I’m using a lime/sand/hair mix. Lime putty is from US heritage. 1:3 mix seems to sandy and is hard to work with. Am I just not adding enough water? Or is lime plaster much harder to work than gypsum?
 

smoother09

Well-Known Member
Anything you need to know in the states just ask Kirk guardinio he’s on YouTube I think you will find him very enlightening! I know I get a semi most times I watch him!
 

malc

TPF Special Forces
So I’m in the United States. I’m using a lime/sand/hair mix. Lime putty is from US heritage. 1:3 mix seems to sandy and is hard to work with. Am I just not adding enough water? Or is lime plaster much harder to work than gypsum?

lime needs longer in the mixer.
 

Olican

Private Member
So I’m in the United States. I’m using a lime/sand/hair mix. Lime putty is from US heritage. 1:3 mix seems to sandy and is hard to work with. Am I just not adding enough water? Or is lime plaster much harder to work than gypsum?
Whereabouts in the States? There's a few American members on here
 

Ritch

Well-Known Member
So I’m in the United States. I’m using a lime/sand/hair mix. Lime putty is from US heritage. 1:3 mix seems to sandy and is hard to work with. Am I just not adding enough water? Or is lime plaster much harder to work than gypsum?
If it’s lime putty it should be nice and creamy, nhl on the other hand can be the deadest/shitest gear to use horrible stuff
 

Mouldyoldspudgun

Well-Known Member
So I’m in the United States. I’m using a lime/sand/hair mix. Lime putty is from US heritage. 1:3 mix seems to sandy and is hard to work with. Am I just not adding enough water? Or is lime plaster much harder to work than gypsum?
What sand are you using? Not building I hope. Shouldn’t hardly any water if any using lime putty
 

worthwords

Active Member
So I’m in the United States. I’m using a lime/sand/hair mix. Lime putty is from US heritage. 1:3 mix seems to sandy and is hard to work with. Am I just not adding enough water? Or is lime plaster much harder to work than gypsum?

lime mortar is thixotropic. Knocking it up sufficiently makes it more workable. Adding too much water can lead to shrinkage and feeble plaster.

Something like : Mix the mortar for 5 minutes (paddle or mixer), allow to rest for three minutes and re-mix for another three minutes.

You can add a little water for workability if it's particularly hard work but you do have to push lime mortar into against the wall.
The tops coats are much richer in lime and fine aggregate should go on smooth as anything though.
 

Heritage Plasters

Active Member
So I’m in the United States. I’m using a lime/sand/hair mix. Lime putty is from US heritage. 1:3 mix seems to sandy and is hard to work with. Am I just not adding enough water? Or is lime plaster much harder to work than gypsum?

Welcome along as our hosts here like to say.

Lime is definitely deferent than gypsum when it comes to mixing and spreading. You also won't be building work out much and if you overwork it on the wall you'll start to delaminate pretty bad.

That said it's not too bad once you get used to it and figure out what you can and can't do. I'm assuming this is an exterior application correct? I haven't used US Heritage but with a name like that it has to be great... maybe I should give it a try .

Last lime project I did was with NHL and like was already mentioned here that stuff is annoying to work with. You have to mix much longer than normal. My mixes were always very wet for about 15 minutes and then the lime would finally catch up and suck out the moisture and make it workable. Thin coats are your friend and don't over work the material on the wall. Measure out your water and follow the mfg recommendations as close as possible. Hope it goes well!
 

Tornadohunter

New Member
Welcome along as our hosts here like to say.

Lime is definitely deferent than gypsum when it comes to mixing and spreading. You also won't be building work out much and if you overwork it on the wall you'll start to delaminate pretty bad.

That said it's not too bad once you get used to it and figure out what you can and can't do. I'm assuming this is an exterior application correct? I haven't used US Heritage but with a name like that it has to be great... maybe I should give it a try .

Last lime project I did was with NHL and like was already mentioned here that stuff is annoying to work with. You have to mix much longer than normal. My mixes were always very wet for about 15 minutes and then the lime would finally catch up and suck out the moisture and make it workable. Thin coats are your friend and don't over work the material on the wall. Measure out your water and follow the mfg recommendations as close as possible. Hope it goes well!
I’m applying it 3/8” at a time. All the old historic material I’ve found says 3/8”. I’ve been a half inch in spots and it stills bonds to the wall well. It’s a solid mix but just not easy to spread evenly.

The lime putty I’m using is aged 3 months. It’s actually around 4 or 5 months now since I’ve had it. Mixing is tedious.
 
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