Winter working

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Rigsby

TPF Special Forces
Found this on a FB rendering group posted by a well established renderer.

Winter working,




A FEW COLD WETHER WORKING TIPS

A few tips from me for cold whether working for exterior renders of most types that I tend to abide by which helps me run my day rather than the day running me!
We’ve all been there, waiting in a cold van, with cold feet waiting to rub up, lights on at 6pm when the sun goes down and the dreading newspaper on the soggy bottoms!
Rendering in cold conditions for me is about effective decision making with the choice of render, choice of mix, choice of prep work and choice of additives if any. There are multiple combinations out there and just because the temperatures drop doesn’t mean you can’t render in sub zero temps or very high temps in the summer. I see Charlie short is out in India and bumping into to men doing cement renders in 37degree heat and I often speak to a guy in Canada doing cement and polymer renders and plasters in temps as low as minus 5 but tends not to when it gets below that.

Things that work me me in the cold

Traditional cement renders:
1. Leaving the gear open for longer (see pic) so water can evaporate instead of all dropping to give a soggy bottom because you’ve sealed the background and hit the top coat with a spat or trowel to close it.
2. Use suction to your advantage so little or no waterproofer in you scratch and use hydration on the cured scratch or background to win your day.
3. Use more suction and key rather than relying on a bond for adhesion.
4. If you substitute plasticiser for a shovel of lime then your set will be increased so a little there to think about
5. On blockwork don’t seal the s**t out of them unless you really have to, ive seen people using micro gobetis on 7n blocks when there is no need.
6. Cavity wall or solid wall? Is the heating on? Is the radiator on that wall blasting away which can effect coloured render scrapes if it’s of solid wall construction. Is the house empty and cold? Sun on that elevation during the morning/ afternoon. These can play an advantage in your decision making.
7. Use of accelerators, calcium chloride flakes (providing no metal is in the system), rapid hardener and frost proofer can all play a part in winning your day when used and gauged correctly.

Cement monocouche:
1. Same day scrape I use Weber with their accelerator but with very low temps you can still find yourself scraping back in the dark if it’s not on early enough or you have limited suction. So in the cold temps I use it for the small jobs when I know it can be on by 11am.
2. I like to be pressure free and do my waiting to scrape in my sleep so I opt for parex. Generally you will find that the renders brought over from Europe and especially from Italy will have a much high lime content making it a slower set time so it’s ideal for your following day scrapes.
3. One coat of monocouche will cure quicker than doing a two coat if your opting for same day scrape as I find your first coat hit with a trowel will be a closed surface. So try and do one pass in cold temps for same day scrapes.
4. Polymer base/scratch coats will have additional additives in so will slow your set time with less suction than block work. So again decision making and opting for following day may prove beneficial.
5. If your worried about a hard scrape take some mixed gear and compact it to close and take it home with you and leave it outside. Check it after you’ve watch EastEnders or after you’ve had you 5th pint. No need to travel back or have a sleepless night worrying.

Silicone renders:
1. Each manufacturer do a additive to add to each bucket like Jub render winter mix. It sets your colour top coat same day and in some conditions hard in 3 hours eliminating the risk of a over night wash off in rain.
2. Polymer base coats will take longer to cure in the cold temps so your wait to apply a colour top will be longer. By applying a waterproof silicone to a base still hydrating will cause trapped moisture and bad adhesion so book other work in for a week or so then return to do a colour coat.

Other general guidelines I abide by:

Frost is the main killer of render so no frost the following night/morning of applying. Freezing temps like minus 3-5 degrees can freeze a wall that open to the elements.
The use of hessian sheeting to cover you gear will protect it and tarps over that to keep off frost on the hessians.
Some great but expensive inferred diesel heaters on the the market that are portable and can be used to you advantage
Windy days can dry render fast, just like it dries your washing fast when you hang it out on the line so keep that in mind for monocouche and traditional work

There are more things you can do and more decision you can make but this is just a general outline that works for me!

Hope this helps a few of you out and your reading your newspapers at home in the warmth rather laying them on soggy bottoms
 

Ritch

Well-Known Member
Found this on a FB rendering group posted by a well established renderer.

Winter working,




A FEW COLD WETHER WORKING TIPS

A few tips from me for cold whether working for exterior renders of most types that I tend to abide by which helps me run my day rather than the day running me!
We’ve all been there, waiting in a cold van, with cold feet waiting to rub up, lights on at 6pm when the sun goes down and the dreading newspaper on the soggy bottoms!
Rendering in cold conditions for me is about effective decision making with the choice of render, choice of mix, choice of prep work and choice of additives if any. There are multiple combinations out there and just because the temperatures drop doesn’t mean you can’t render in sub zero temps or very high temps in the summer. I see Charlie short is out in India and bumping into to men doing cement renders in 37degree heat and I often speak to a guy in Canada doing cement and polymer renders and plasters in temps as low as minus 5 but tends not to when it gets below that.

Things that work me me in the cold

Traditional cement renders:
1. Leaving the gear open for longer (see pic) so water can evaporate instead of all dropping to give a soggy bottom because you’ve sealed the background and hit the top coat with a spat or trowel to close it.
2. Use suction to your advantage so little or no waterproofer in you scratch and use hydration on the cured scratch or background to win your day.
3. Use more suction and key rather than relying on a bond for adhesion.
4. If you substitute plasticiser for a shovel of lime then your set will be increased so a little there to think about
5. On blockwork don’t seal the s**t out of them unless you really have to, ive seen people using micro gobetis on 7n blocks when there is no need.
6. Cavity wall or solid wall? Is the heating on? Is the radiator on that wall blasting away which can effect coloured render scrapes if it’s of solid wall construction. Is the house empty and cold? Sun on that elevation during the morning/ afternoon. These can play an advantage in your decision making.
7. Use of accelerators, calcium chloride flakes (providing no metal is in the system), rapid hardener and frost proofer can all play a part in winning your day when used and gauged correctly.

Cement monocouche:
1. Same day scrape I use Weber with their accelerator but with very low temps you can still find yourself scraping back in the dark if it’s not on early enough or you have limited suction. So in the cold temps I use it for the small jobs when I know it can be on by 11am.
2. I like to be pressure free and do my waiting to scrape in my sleep so I opt for parex. Generally you will find that the renders brought over from Europe and especially from Italy will have a much high lime content making it a slower set time so it’s ideal for your following day scrapes.
3. One coat of monocouche will cure quicker than doing a two coat if your opting for same day scrape as I find your first coat hit with a trowel will be a closed surface. So try and do one pass in cold temps for same day scrapes.
4. Polymer base/scratch coats will have additional additives in so will slow your set time with less suction than block work. So again decision making and opting for following day may prove beneficial.
5. If your worried about a hard scrape take some mixed gear and compact it to close and take it home with you and leave it outside. Check it after you’ve watch EastEnders or after you’ve had you 5th pint. No need to travel back or have a sleepless night worrying.

Silicone renders:
1. Each manufacturer do a additive to add to each bucket like Jub render winter mix. It sets your colour top coat same day and in some conditions hard in 3 hours eliminating the risk of a over night wash off in rain.
2. Polymer base coats will take longer to cure in the cold temps so your wait to apply a colour top will be longer. By applying a waterproof silicone to a base still hydrating will cause trapped moisture and bad adhesion so book other work in for a week or so then return to do a colour coat.

Other general guidelines I abide by:

Frost is the main killer of render so no frost the following night/morning of applying. Freezing temps like minus 3-5 degrees can freeze a wall that open to the elements.
The use of hessian sheeting to cover you gear will protect it and tarps over that to keep off frost on the hessians.
Some great but expensive inferred diesel heaters on the the market that are portable and can be used to you advantage
Windy days can dry render fast, just like it dries your washing fast when you hang it out on the line so keep that in mind for monocouche and traditional work

There are more things you can do and more decision you can make but this is just a general outline that works for me!

Hope this helps a few of you out and your reading your newspapers at home in the warmth rather laying them on soggy bottoms
ive been plastering/rendering 15years and I’m still learning new tricks all the time with render mainly s and c very skillful part of the trade when done correctly
 

owls

Private Member
Best laid plans and all that,the worst are sneaky frosts when it gives out a 3c and then drops to freezing point.
Still the amount of desperados you see rendering on frost or near frosts, they deserve all they get.
Rendering in winter can catch you out but if you spread your bets you can make a living, in our case I’ll always have 3 jobs on the go at different stages, fixing insulation, replacing leadwork, hacking off etc frost don’t matter. I’d rather have it cold than wet,and wet you can get a week of rain In July where you can’t get much done.
 

carys

Well-Known Member
Found this on a FB rendering group posted by a well established renderer.

Winter working,




A FEW COLD WETHER WORKING TIPS

A few tips from me for cold whether working for exterior renders of most types that I tend to abide by which helps me run my day rather than the day running me!
We’ve all been there, waiting in a cold van, with cold feet waiting to rub up, lights on at 6pm when the sun goes down and the dreading newspaper on the soggy bottoms!
Rendering in cold conditions for me is about effective decision making with the choice of render, choice of mix, choice of prep work and choice of additives if any. There are multiple combinations out there and just because the temperatures drop doesn’t mean you can’t render in sub zero temps or very high temps in the summer. I see Charlie short is out in India and bumping into to men doing cement renders in 37degree heat and I often speak to a guy in Canada doing cement and polymer renders and plasters in temps as low as minus 5 but tends not to when it gets below that.

Things that work me me in the cold

Traditional cement renders:
1. Leaving the gear open for longer (see pic) so water can evaporate instead of all dropping to give a soggy bottom because you’ve sealed the background and hit the top coat with a spat or trowel to close it.
2. Use suction to your advantage so little or no waterproofer in you scratch and use hydration on the cured scratch or background to win your day.
3. Use more suction and key rather than relying on a bond for adhesion.
4. If you substitute plasticiser for a shovel of lime then your set will be increased so a little there to think about
5. On blockwork don’t seal the s**t out of them unless you really have to, ive seen people using micro gobetis on 7n blocks when there is no need.
6. Cavity wall or solid wall? Is the heating on? Is the radiator on that wall blasting away which can effect coloured render scrapes if it’s of solid wall construction. Is the house empty and cold? Sun on that elevation during the morning/ afternoon. These can play an advantage in your decision making.
7. Use of accelerators, calcium chloride flakes (providing no metal is in the system), rapid hardener and frost proofer can all play a part in winning your day when used and gauged correctly.

Cement monocouche:
1. Same day scrape I use Weber with their accelerator but with very low temps you can still find yourself scraping back in the dark if it’s not on early enough or you have limited suction. So in the cold temps I use it for the small jobs when I know it can be on by 11am.
2. I like to be pressure free and do my waiting to scrape in my sleep so I opt for parex. Generally you will find that the renders brought over from Europe and especially from Italy will have a much high lime content making it a slower set time so it’s ideal for your following day scrapes.
3. One coat of monocouche will cure quicker than doing a two coat if your opting for same day scrape as I find your first coat hit with a trowel will be a closed surface. So try and do one pass in cold temps for same day scrapes.
4. Polymer base/scratch coats will have additional additives in so will slow your set time with less suction than block work. So again decision making and opting for following day may prove beneficial.
5. If your worried about a hard scrape take some mixed gear and compact it to close and take it home with you and leave it outside. Check it after you’ve watch EastEnders or after you’ve had you 5th pint. No need to travel back or have a sleepless night worrying.

Silicone renders:
1. Each manufacturer do a additive to add to each bucket like Jub render winter mix. It sets your colour top coat same day and in some conditions hard in 3 hours eliminating the risk of a over night wash off in rain.
2. Polymer base coats will take longer to cure in the cold temps so your wait to apply a colour top will be longer. By applying a waterproof silicone to a base still hydrating will cause trapped moisture and bad adhesion so book other work in for a week or so then return to do a colour coat.

Other general guidelines I abide by:

Frost is the main killer of render so no frost the following night/morning of applying. Freezing temps like minus 3-5 degrees can freeze a wall that open to the elements.
The use of hessian sheeting to cover you gear will protect it and tarps over that to keep off frost on the hessians.
Some great but expensive inferred diesel heaters on the the market that are portable and can be used to you advantage
Windy days can dry render fast, just like it dries your washing fast when you hang it out on the line so keep that in mind for monocouche and traditional work

There are more things you can do and more decision you can make but this is just a general outline that works for me!

Hope this helps a few of you out and your reading your newspapers at home in the warmth rather laying them on soggy bottoms
I've got a good plan pack winter in
 

owls

Private Member
I just idle over, over winter, enough to pay wages and cover overheads and I’m happy, March to November for making your income in the render game, if your getting to December and still needing to churn the metres out, your doing something wrong.
 

Vincey

Private Member
Back Thursday to finish
Last job of year
DC7C2710-6E81-4753-A205-366FEEF473DA.jpeg
FA3B6120-31A9-4678-B183-C63D23402FF1.jpeg
 

Andy M

Active Member
I just idle over, over winter, enough to pay wages and cover overheads and I’m happy, March to November for making your income in the render game, if your getting to December and still needing to churn the metres out, your doing something wrong.
Pressure off builders and so on to get jobs turned out makes me go right through.
I always check the forecasts for rain and frost and if it's imminent I will send an email or simply a text to said Builder/Customer with my concerns.
If they push to go ahead then the onus isn't on me.
 

carys

Well-Known Member
I just idle over, over winter, enough to pay wages and cover overheads and I’m happy, March to November for making your income in the render game, if your getting to December and still needing to churn the metres out, your doing something wrong.
Your rhight m8 I'm just taking easy over winter ticking over. shortest day friday body starting to charge then for March.
 

carys

Well-Known Member
Your rhight m8 I'm just taking easy over winter ticking over. shortest day friday body starting to charge then for March.
What I don't understand y do fuking people ask you to do a render job over winter. OK small render jobs OK. But re render a complete house could be ther for months it only 3months winter leave till March for f**k sakes. If some one ask me I just advice them not to. I guess when you got over heads and lads working on cards you got to take the gamble. Easy for me to say only got myself to keep
 

owls

Private Member
I idle over, as employ lads that rely on me and work to put food on the table ,plus builders who we work for never plan anything and see rendering in January as the same as July.
 

Rigsby

TPF Special Forces
I've got a good plan pack winter in

Nah, I can do
What I don't understand y do fuking people ask you to do a render job over winter. OK small render jobs OK. But re render a complete house could be ther for months it only 3months winter leave till March for f**k sakes. If some one ask me I just advice them not to. I guess when you got over heads and lads working on cards you got to take the gamble. Easy for me to say only got myself to keep

Some winters can be better than late March and April. I find Spring a horrible unpredictable season. All 4 seasons in one.
 

johnboy811

New Member
What I don't understand y do fuking people ask you to do a render job over winter. OK small render jobs OK. But re render a complete house could be ther for months it only 3months winter leave till March for f**k sakes. If some one ask me I just advice them not to. I guess when you got over heads and lads working on cards you got to take the gamble. Easy for me to say only got myself to keep
We seem to get more rendering in the winter than the summer! We tell them wait till spring at the earliest or get someone else
 

carys

Well-Known Member
Nah, I can do


Some winters can be better than late March and April. I find Spring a horrible unpredictable season. All 4 seasons in one.
Not very often that happens march many weather. But we got to look on the bright side shortist day this friday 21 getting lighter by the minute don't notice really til mid feb never mind on the way back to day light from this Friday for all the SAD sufferers
 

Andy g

Well-Known Member
Found this on a FB rendering group posted by a well established renderer.

Winter working,




A FEW COLD WETHER WORKING TIPS

A few tips from me for cold whether working for exterior renders of most types that I tend to abide by which helps me run my day rather than the day running me!
We’ve all been there, waiting in a cold van, with cold feet waiting to rub up, lights on at 6pm when the sun goes down and the dreading newspaper on the soggy bottoms!
Rendering in cold conditions for me is about effective decision making with the choice of render, choice of mix, choice of prep work and choice of additives if any. There are multiple combinations out there and just because the temperatures drop doesn’t mean you can’t render in sub zero temps or very high temps in the summer. I see Charlie short is out in India and bumping into to men doing cement renders in 37degree heat and I often speak to a guy in Canada doing cement and polymer renders and plasters in temps as low as minus 5 but tends not to when it gets below that.

Things that work me me in the cold

Traditional cement renders:
1. Leaving the gear open for longer (see pic) so water can evaporate instead of all dropping to give a soggy bottom because you’ve sealed the background and hit the top coat with a spat or trowel to close it.
2. Use suction to your advantage so little or no waterproofer in you scratch and use hydration on the cured scratch or background to win your day.
3. Use more suction and key rather than relying on a bond for adhesion.
4. If you substitute plasticiser for a shovel of lime then your set will be increased so a little there to think about
5. On blockwork don’t seal the s**t out of them unless you really have to, ive seen people using micro gobetis on 7n blocks when there is no need.
6. Cavity wall or solid wall? Is the heating on? Is the radiator on that wall blasting away which can effect coloured render scrapes if it’s of solid wall construction. Is the house empty and cold? Sun on that elevation during the morning/ afternoon. These can play an advantage in your decision making.
7. Use of accelerators, calcium chloride flakes (providing no metal is in the system), rapid hardener and frost proofer can all play a part in winning your day when used and gauged correctly.

Cement monocouche:
1. Same day scrape I use Weber with their accelerator but with very low temps you can still find yourself scraping back in the dark if it’s not on early enough or you have limited suction. So in the cold temps I use it for the small jobs when I know it can be on by 11am.
2. I like to be pressure free and do my waiting to scrape in my sleep so I opt for parex. Generally you will find that the renders brought over from Europe and especially from Italy will have a much high lime content making it a slower set time so it’s ideal for your following day scrapes.
3. One coat of monocouche will cure quicker than doing a two coat if your opting for same day scrape as I find your first coat hit with a trowel will be a closed surface. So try and do one pass in cold temps for same day scrapes.
4. Polymer base/scratch coats will have additional additives in so will slow your set time with less suction than block work. So again decision making and opting for following day may prove beneficial.
5. If your worried about a hard scrape take some mixed gear and compact it to close and take it home with you and leave it outside. Check it after you’ve watch EastEnders or after you’ve had you 5th pint. No need to travel back or have a sleepless night worrying.

Silicone renders:
1. Each manufacturer do a additive to add to each bucket like Jub render winter mix. It sets your colour top coat same day and in some conditions hard in 3 hours eliminating the risk of a over night wash off in rain.
2. Polymer base coats will take longer to cure in the cold temps so your wait to apply a colour top will be longer. By applying a waterproof silicone to a base still hydrating will cause trapped moisture and bad adhesion so book other work in for a week or so then return to do a colour coat.

Other general guidelines I abide by:

Frost is the main killer of render so no frost the following night/morning of applying. Freezing temps like minus 3-5 degrees can freeze a wall that open to the elements.
The use of hessian sheeting to cover you gear will protect it and tarps over that to keep off frost on the hessians.
Some great but expensive inferred diesel heaters on the the market that are portable and can be used to you advantage
Windy days can dry render fast, just like it dries your washing fast when you hang it out on the line so keep that in mind for monocouche and traditional work

There are more things you can do and more decision you can make but this is just a general outline that works for me!

Hope this helps a few of you out and your reading your newspapers at home in the warmth rather laying them on soggy bottoms
Rigsby when was the last time u rended a house with sand cement and Bella mixer or his this old ways no good anymore
 

Rigsby

TPF Special Forces
Rigsby when was the last time u rended a house with sand cement and Bella mixer or his this old ways no good anymore

My last three jobs before I quit was sand and cement with a Belle mixer. We all prefer the old way. No stress or arguments. Happy days and easy money.
 

Andy g

Well-Known Member
My last three jobs before I quit was sand and cement with a Belle mixer. We all prefer the old way. No stress or arguments. Happy days and easy money.
Rigsby u do plain render Finnish,in sand cement so u can paint it ,and what the best way to do this using handboard trowel plastic beads or ss
 

Rigsby

TPF Special Forces
My sand and cement jobs was pebbledashing. I would probably use Johnstones ocr for plain flat render unless it was the customer wanting s&c.

But if it was sand and cement it would be 5 Plastering sand, 1 building samd, 1 cement, 1 lime with 80ml of Febmix onto a waterproof scratch coat.
 

Andy g

Well-Known Member
Found this on a FB rendering group posted by a well established renderer.

Winter working,




A FEW COLD WETHER WORKING TIPS

A few tips from me for cold whether working for exterior renders of most types that I tend to abide by which helps me run my day rather than the day running me!
We’ve all been there, waiting in a cold van, with cold feet waiting to rub up, lights on at 6pm when the sun goes down and the dreading newspaper on the soggy bottoms!
Rendering in cold conditions for me is about effective decision making with the choice of render, choice of mix, choice of prep work and choice of additives if any. There are multiple combinations out there and just because the temperatures drop doesn’t mean you can’t render in sub zero temps or very high temps in the summer. I see Charlie short is out in India and bumping into to men doing cement renders in 37degree heat and I often speak to a guy in Canada doing cement and polymer renders and plasters in temps as low as minus 5 but tends not to when it gets below that.

Things that work me me in the cold

Traditional cement renders:
1. Leaving the gear open for longer (see pic) so water can evaporate instead of all dropping to give a soggy bottom because you’ve sealed the background and hit the top coat with a spat or trowel to close it.
2. Use suction to your advantage so little or no waterproofer in you scratch and use hydration on the cured scratch or background to win your day.
3. Use more suction and key rather than relying on a bond for adhesion.
4. If you substitute plasticiser for a shovel of lime then your set will be increased so a little there to think about
5. On blockwork don’t seal the s**t out of them unless you really have to, ive seen people using micro gobetis on 7n blocks when there is no need.
6. Cavity wall or solid wall? Is the heating on? Is the radiator on that wall blasting away which can effect coloured render scrapes if it’s of solid wall construction. Is the house empty and cold? Sun on that elevation during the morning/ afternoon. These can play an advantage in your decision making.
7. Use of accelerators, calcium chloride flakes (providing no metal is in the system), rapid hardener and frost proofer can all play a part in winning your day when used and gauged correctly.

Cement monocouche:
1. Same day scrape I use Weber with their accelerator but with very low temps you can still find yourself scraping back in the dark if it’s not on early enough or you have limited suction. So in the cold temps I use it for the small jobs when I know it can be on by 11am.
2. I like to be pressure free and do my waiting to scrape in my sleep so I opt for parex. Generally you will find that the renders brought over from Europe and especially from Italy will have a much high lime content making it a slower set time so it’s ideal for your following day scrapes.
3. One coat of monocouche will cure quicker than doing a two coat if your opting for same day scrape as I find your first coat hit with a trowel will be a closed surface. So try and do one pass in cold temps for same day scrapes.
4. Polymer base/scratch coats will have additional additives in so will slow your set time with less suction than block work. So again decision making and opting for following day may prove beneficial.
5. If your worried about a hard scrape take some mixed gear and compact it to close and take it home with you and leave it outside. Check it after you’ve watch EastEnders or after you’ve had you 5th pint. No need to travel back or have a sleepless night worrying.

Silicone renders:
1. Each manufacturer do a additive to add to each bucket like Jub render winter mix. It sets your colour top coat same day and in some conditions hard in 3 hours eliminating the risk of a over night wash off in rain.
2. Polymer base coats will take longer to cure in the cold temps so your wait to apply a colour top will be longer. By applying a waterproof silicone to a base still hydrating will cause trapped moisture and bad adhesion so book other work in for a week or so then return to do a colour coat.

Other general guidelines I abide by:

Frost is the main killer of render so no frost the following night/morning of applying. Freezing temps like minus 3-5 degrees can freeze a wall that open to the elements.
The use of hessian sheeting to cover you gear will protect it and tarps over that to keep off frost on the hessians.
Some great but expensive inferred diesel heaters on the the market that are portable and can be used to you advantage
Windy days can dry render fast, just like it dries your washing fast when you hang it out on the line so keep that in mind for monocouche and traditional work

There are more things you can do and more decision you can make but this is just a general outline that works for me!

Hope this helps a few of you out and your reading your newspapers at home in the warmth rather laying them on soggy bottoms
Rigsby do u put your own scaffolding up on rendering jobs ,I have some scaffolding if I can get into rendering work
 

Mr White

Active Member
Rigsby do u put your own scaffolding up on rendering jobs ,I have some scaffolding if I can get into rendering work


You don’t put your own scaffolding up, you get a scaffolder.

If you start going down that route your either a scaffolder or a renderer.

Some scaffolds need to go very high, other people will use it whether you like it or not, whether it’s safe or not.

You don’t mess about with scaffolding to put an extra few £ in your back pocket. If you did put scaffolding up and someone fell off it or killed themselves on it you’re in a world of $hit.

If it collapses and damages property you’d be liable.
 

Andy g

Well-Known Member
You don’t put your own scaffolding up, you get a scaffolder.

If you start going down that route your either a scaffolder or a renderer.

Some scaffolds need to go very high, other people will use it whether you like it or not, whether it’s safe or not.

You don’t mess about with scaffolding to put an extra few £ in your back pocket. If you did put scaffolding up and someone fell off it or killed themselves on it you’re in a world of $hit.

If it collapses and damages property you’d be liable.
Nice love ,just a thought own scaffolding more profitable money, but I here what u say bud
 

Andy g

Well-Known Member
You don’t put your own scaffolding up, you get a scaffolder.

If you start going down that route your either a scaffolder or a renderer.

Some scaffolds need to go very high, other people will use it whether you like it or not, whether it’s safe or not.

You don’t mess about with scaffolding to put an extra few £ in your back pocket. If you did put scaffolding up and someone fell off it or killed themselves on it you’re in a world of $hit.

If it collapses and damages property you’d be liable.
Mr white Were u from
 

Mr White

Active Member
Nice love ,just a thought own scaffolding more profitable money, but I here what u say bud

Not worth the risk mate, honestly.

Believe me, there’s more to scaffolding than a few poles and boards.

Better and more profitable for you to leave it to the professionals.

A correctly scaffolded job can be turned over like a dream, tight to wall, over reaching poor scaffolding can add days into a job.

Then factor in the safety and regulations, it’s a no brainer
 

Rigsby

TPF Special Forces
I used to have my own scaffolding, SGB Cuplock. Was quite good at it and had a scaffolding ticket. But my lads loathed doing it.

In the end there was not a lot to be saved and although I had it to a good standard it was made to my attention that my lads was not insured for erecting it or taking it down. They wasn’t interested in getting a scaffolding ticket so I sold it.

But there is a lot of legality regarding scaffolding so it’s best left to the professional. Pay a bit more for a good company, cheap is not worth the hassle.
 
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