Who's right about this plastering/rendering: my builder or "the one with the attitude problem" ?

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SlumberShade

New Member
Right, so I'm in a forum and some annoying forumite is saying my builder doesn't know what they are talking about. I know nothing about nothing though, so I feel compelled to check somewhere else suitable like here!

I really hope that the one with the attitude problem is the wrong one!

It's regarding the starting point of my bathroom renovation: (room pictured)
IMG_20210723_130317.jpg

In the quote the builder mentions: "hack off all the walls and pull all the timber cladding off the ceiling hack off any damp walls and re render with waterproof sand and cement one with a scratch coat and one top coat then re board the ceiling with plaster board and re plaster the ceiling and walls"

The forumite mentions: "Also, it's utterly pointless putting waterproof render in any house, let alone upstairs! You're dealing with someone who doesn't really understand what they are doing, and I get the impression that you understand even less about home maintenance. If there is some kind of penetrating damp, it needs fixing at source, not a waterproof coat being put on the inside. That just hides it on the internal wall surface but won't prevent ingress. Did you know that removing a certain amount of plaster also triggers building regulations for insulation to put into the walls?

The builder mentioned also waterproof sand for the outside where there are cracks. "Front wall main house cut out any cracked or loose render and make good with waterproof sand and cement "

As far as I know the roof was the cause of damp problems and has been fixed.

Thanks guys.
 
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Monkey Boy

Well-Known Member
Forumite is largely right
Don’t see any attitude problem there
Builder May have used term ‘waterproof’ wrongly too
That bathroom defo needs doing
 

Dansouthcoast84

Private Member
no one is wrong.

your builder is prob just old school.

it wont do any harm using sand cement for walls. look at any old house and the make up.

new builds are mainly plasterboard nowadays.


as for external. a patch job may be all can be budgeted for.
 

superspread

Well-Known Member
Right, so I'm in a forum and some annoying forumite is saying my builder doesn't know what they are talking about. I know nothing about nothing though, so I feel compelled to check somewhere else suitable like here!

I really hope that the one with the attitude problem is the wrong one!

It's regarding the starting point of my bathroom renovation: (room pictured) View attachment 64174
In the quote the builder mentions: "hack off all the walls and pull all the timber cladding off the ceiling hack off any damp walls and re render with waterproof sand and cement one with a scratch coat and one top coat then re board the ceiling with plaster board and re plaster the ceiling and walls"

The forumite mentions: "Also, it's utterly pointless putting waterproof render in any house, let alone upstairs! You're dealing with someone who doesn't really understand what they are doing, and I get the impression that you understand even less about home maintenance. If there is some kind of penetrating damp, it needs fixing at source, not a waterproof coat being put on the inside. That just hides it on the internal wall surface but won't prevent ingress. Did you know that removing a certain amount of plaster also triggers building regulations for insulation to put into the walls?

The builder mentioned also waterproof sand for the outside where there are cracks. "Front wall main house cut out any cracked or loose render and make good with waterproof sand and cement "

As far as I know the roof was the cause of damp problems and has been fixed.

Thanks guys.
I’m with the builder, all sounds good to me
 
A builder when mentioning waterproofing in a quote means putting a splash of waterproofer in the mix all this will do is stop the plastering from setting it will not act as a water proof barrier. To waterproof anything internally you need to apply a tanking slurry, usually for below ground or solid walls.
 
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