Which trowels

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I've been plastering for over twenty five years and probably kept myself to myself and don't look at new ways, so it was a surprise to me to decide to buy a new trowel. Having always used Marsheltown I decided to go for a s*p*r*lex from Regina. It said suitable for multi and board finish. Perfect I thought.
It turned up and the blade is really thin and written on the packaging it states only for latter troweling.
What a rip off I thought having always used one trowel for everything.
So without teaching me to suck eggs what's the M.O with trowels now. Do I really need one for putting on, another one for laying and another for troweling plus also a plastic one?
And why is everyone obsessed with plaster being really smooth!
I was taught to make it flat with no marks but to feel like a really fine grade sand paper so it takes the paint well.
This should be fun.........eeek
 

Stewie03

Well-Known Member
Sounds like you have purchased a s*p*r*lex trowel which is just for a cross trowel towards the end of the set u may aswell keep it for that really, stick to marshalltown for laying on,
 

Ian Smith

New Member
I just use it for the last 2 trowels so I can apply less pressure, I find if I use a carbon steel trowel for the first trowel I get tiger stripes but if I use a stainless steel trowel for the first one then I don't, just wandering if anyone else found this
 

John j

Mono Don
I've been plastering for over twenty five years and probably kept myself to myself and don't look at new ways, so it was a surprise to me to decide to buy a new trowel. Having always used Marsheltown I decided to go for a s*p*r*lex from Regina. It said suitable for multi and board finish. Perfect I thought.
It turned up and the blade is really thin and written on the packaging it states only for latter troweling.
What a rip off I thought having always used one trowel for everything.
So without teaching me to suck eggs what's the M.O with trowels now. Do I really need one for putting on, another one for laying and another for troweling plus also a plastic one?
And why is everyone obsessed with plaster being really smooth!
I was taught to make it flat with no marks but to feel like a really fine grade sand paper so it takes the paint well.
This should be fun.........eeek
What's M O mean
 
The acronym MO is short for modus operandi, an expression directly from Latin meaning “way of operating.” Modus operandi was first recorded in English by the 1650s.
I copy and pasted that bit. It used to be simple. One trowel for the whole lot......
What's the finatex trowel for?
 
Last edited:

Retired Spread

Well-Known Member
I've been plastering for over twenty five years and probably kept myself to myself and don't look at new ways, so it was a surprise to me to decide to buy a new trowel. Having always used Marsheltown I decided to go for a s*p*r*lex from Regina. It said suitable for multi and board finish. Perfect I thought.
It turned up and the blade is really thin and written on the packaging it states only for latter troweling.
What a rip off I thought having always used one trowel for everything.
So without teaching me to suck eggs what's the M.O with trowels now. Do I really need one for putting on, another one for laying and another for troweling plus also a plastic one?
And why is everyone obsessed with plaster being really smooth!
I was taught to make it flat with no marks but to feel like a really fine grade sand paper so it takes the paint well.
This should be fun.........eeek
you can still leave skim nice and smooth without shining the shiit out of it.

Any decent spread should be able to do the whole set with one trowel.
 

MakeItSmooth

Well-Known Member
What's the finatex trowel for?

Finatex 1 = 0.6mm

Finatex 2 = 0.5mm


If it's a 2, it's unlikely to be stiff enough to lay on with.

Generally speaking, something around 0.7mm (give or take) is commonly used for laying on with.

In any case, the Finatex 1 is intended for laying on with (i.e. all the way through the set, as per your old trowel). For what it's worth (don't shoot the messenger) I know Macplastering, on youtube, likes to lay on with a Finatex 1.
 

Mouldyoldspudgun

Well-Known Member
The acronym MO is short for modus operandi, an expression directly from Latin meaning “way of operating.” Modus operandi was first recorded in English by the 1650s.
I copy and pasted that bit. It used to be simple. One trowel for the whole lot......
What's the finatex trowel for?
I only use one trowel always have, my son uses one of those weird things if it’s greasy and won’t finish, me personally I think they are G**.
 

Monkey Boy

Well-Known Member
Soon as you get tiger stripes just sit your arse back down and let it pick up abit longer
GIF by Frosted Flakes
 
From the Queen, predictive text me thinks..lol
Thanks for everyone's input. I quite like the handle on the refina. It's very comfy. I used it for last trowel today just because. Does anyone know the thickness on the Marshall town permashape?
If the finatex 1 is as flat as the s*p*r*lex then it would make putting on difficult. I remember years ago we all used to take the Mickey out of ragni for being flat with no shape. A DIY stores trowel....lol
As far as tiger Stripes are concerned. A carbon steel will cause them if it's got a build up of rust as the fat gets stuck on it. It's then like aqua plaining on plaster.
The fat drags the surface of plaster away leaving your tiger Stripes.
Clean trowel very often. Get on the first at the right time. Also the angle of the towel can cause it. If you get it try the 123 to bring moisture back to the surface and then keep the trowel flatter with a medium firm pressure, that should get rid of most of them.
Why does Mac plaster spray all that water on. I remember years ago the plaster packet said use water sparingly and only in the latter stages to lubricate the trowel. Too much water weakens the plaster and then it dries with a white dust over the surface. The decorators hate that....lol
 

smoother09

Well-Known Member
It's finished a few guys been no good!, I know of one that had to get a job as a train conducter due to his lack of skill and many many many complaints about his work! Scottish I think he comes on from time to time to tell lads about train deals ect.
 

bobski

Well-Known Member
I just use it for the last 2 trowels so I can apply less pressure, I find if I use a carbon steel trowel for the first trowel I get tiger stripes but if I use a stainless steel trowel for the first one then I don't, just wandering if anyone else found this


When both well worn in, and timing correct - neither.

That said, my carbons stripe way less than stainless.
 
I always rub sandpaper over my carbon first thing in a morning. Got it in my head it takes a fine layer of rust off.
If carbon trowel is kept clean it will perform just as good. You still get tiger Stripes if you let fat build up on the edges, just clean of with a brush. Likewise on stainless you get that crusty buildup. That lets the way fat cling to our which in turn will make Stripes.
It's basically the fresh fat on your trowel edge not allowing the metal to contact the plaster. It then drags the surface off creating Stripes. It also has to do with timings too
 

John j

Mono Don
If carbon trowel is kept clean it will perform just as good. You still get tiger Stripes if you let fat build up on the edges, just clean of with a brush. Likewise on stainless you get that crusty buildup. That lets the way fat cling to our which in turn will make Stripes.
It's basically the fresh fat on your trowel edge not allowing the metal to contact the plaster. It then drags the surface off creating Stripes. It also has to do with timings too
And to much water not enough water to thick to thin .
 
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