Welder for beginner

ncowan

Member
Welding is another thing I want to learn, plus I want to have welder around house for little things and maybe for bigger projects. I think it's one of those tools that if you don't have it - you get by, but when you do - there is many uses.

I read seems like millions pages on this forums. I will try to put my needs and wants in bullet points and then see what you guys have to say.

Immediate needs related to my cars hobby:
- Weld onto broken studs to get them out
- Assemble special tools for doing something like suspension puller, etc
- Weld exhaust, replace cats, etc
- Weld O2 wideband threaded nipple onto exhaust
- MAYBE do my own manifolds if I get into turbo my car, would be cool to make one myself
- Maybe do some sheet metal repairs

Around the house:
- Build some permanent metal work surfaces like table for lathe, mill, etc.
- Fix some iron railing around the house
- Build greenhouse using metal tubing (aluminum? stainless?)

At first it seems like MIG will do most of this, if not all. Seems like TIG will do all of this but be slow.

I was thinking if I go MIG than Hobart 190 will be good, but it's 220 only machine. I have 220 in garage but it would be nice if I can move it with extension cord and maybe use 110 when needed. Hobart 140 is highly praised and seem to be go to model for beginners. But I do see myself working with 1/4 metal and 140 is pushing it from what I read.

Also after reading so many pages and drooling over those TIG welds I'm not so sure and maybe I should learn TIG right away? What machine is good?

For budget: I want something which will work good and I won't have to fight with. But I am beginner and will use it occasionally only, don't need latest and greatest.

Any words of wisdom?
 

ncowan

Member
Welding is another thing I want to learn, plus I want to have welder around house for little things and maybe for bigger projects. I think it's one of those tools that if you don't have it - you get by, but when you do - there is many uses.

I read seems like millions pages on this forums. I will try to put my needs and wants in bullet points and then see what you guys have to say.

Immediate needs related to my cars hobby:
- Weld onto broken studs to get them out
- Assemble special tools for doing something like suspension puller, etc
- Weld exhaust, replace cats, etc
- Weld O2 wideband threaded nipple onto exhaust
- MAYBE do my own manifolds if I get into turbo my car, would be cool to make one myself
- Maybe do some sheet metal repairs

Around the house:
- Build some permanent metal work surfaces like table for lathe, mill, etc.
- Fix some iron railing around the house
- Build greenhouse using metal tubing (aluminum? stainless?)

At first it seems like MIG will do most of this, if not all. Seems like TIG will do all of this but be slow.

I was thinking if I go MIG than Hobart 190 will be good, but it's 220 only machine. I have 220 in garage but it would be nice if I can move it with extension cord and maybe use 110 when needed. Hobart 140 is highly praised and seem to be go to model for beginners mobile welder dallas ga. But I do see myself working with 1/4 metal and 140 is pushing it from what I read.

Also after reading so many pages and drooling over those TIG welds I'm not so sure and maybe I should learn TIG right away? What machine is good?

For budget: I want something which will work good and I won't have to fight with. But I am beginner and will use it occasionally only, don't need latest and greatest.

Any words of wisdom?
thanks in advance for any help
 

Cockney1

Well-Known Member
Welding is another thing I want to learn, plus I want to have welder around house for little things and maybe for bigger projects. I think it's one of those tools that if you don't have it - you get by, but when you do - there is many uses.

I read seems like millions pages on this forums. I will try to put my needs and wants in bullet points and then see what you guys have to say.

Immediate needs related to my cars hobby:
- Weld onto broken studs to get them out
- Assemble special tools for doing something like suspension puller, etc
- Weld exhaust, replace cats, etc
- Weld O2 wideband threaded nipple onto exhaust
- MAYBE do my own manifolds if I get into turbo my car, would be cool to make one myself
- Maybe do some sheet metal repairs

Around the house:
- Build some permanent metal work surfaces like table for lathe, mill, etc.
- Fix some iron railing around the house
- Build greenhouse using metal tubing (aluminum? stainless?)

At first it seems like MIG will do most of this, if not all. Seems like TIG will do all of this but be slow.

I was thinking if I go MIG than Hobart 190 will be good, but it's 220 only machine. I have 220 in garage but it would be nice if I can move it with extension cord and maybe use 110 when needed. Hobart 140 is highly praised and seem to be go to model for beginners. But I do see myself working with 1/4 metal and 140 is pushing it from what I read.

Also after reading so many pages and drooling over those TIG welds I'm not so sure and maybe I should learn TIG right away? What machine is good?

For budget: I want something which will work good and I won't have to fight with. But I am beginner and will use it occasionally only, don't need latest and greatest.

Any words of wisdom?
@John j break time read for you mate!
 
Welding is another thing I want to learn, plus I want to have welder around house for little things and maybe for bigger projects. I think it's one of those tools that if you don't have it - you get by, but when you do - there is many uses.

I read seems like millions pages on this forums. I will try to put my needs and wants in bullet points and then see what you guys have to say.

Immediate needs related to my cars hobby:
- Weld onto broken studs to get them out
- Assemble special tools for doing something like suspension puller, etc
- Weld exhaust, replace cats, etc
- Weld O2 wideband threaded nipple onto exhaust
- MAYBE do my own manifolds if I get into turbo my car, would be cool to make one myself
- Maybe do some sheet metal repairs

Around the house:
- Build some permanent metal work surfaces like table for lathe, mill, etc.
- Fix some iron railing around the house
- Build greenhouse using metal tubing (aluminum? stainless?)

At first it seems like MIG will do most of this, if not all. Seems like TIG will do all of this but be slow.

I was thinking if I go MIG than Hobart 190 will be good, but it's 220 only machine. I have 220 in garage but it would be nice if I can move it with extension cord and maybe use 110 when needed. Hobart 140 is highly praised and seem to be go to model for beginners. But I do see myself working with 1/4 metal and 140 is pushing it from what I read.

Also after reading so many pages and drooling over those TIG welds I'm not so sure and maybe I should learn TIG right away? What machine is good?

For budget: I want something which will work good and I won't have to fight with. But I am beginner and will use it occasionally only, don't need latest and greatest.

Any words of wisdom?
I think this is the wrong forum.... but I weld a lot so I can help a little...

I have a tig welder that welds aluminium as well... it's a lot of money to buy and eats argon but it welds everything from aluminium to stainless steel... but you will spend about £1k on one...

I also have a gas/no gas mig and it has been great. I use it to take stuff up and general steel work....

I have a Clarke 130en I think and it does what I need. I have built 2 kit cars and made loads of stuff for around the house....

I have a powder coating tool as well which is a game changer
 

bobski

Well-Known Member
Welding is another thing I want to learn, plus I want to have welder around house for little things and maybe for bigger projects. I think it's one of those tools that if you don't have it - you get by, but when you do - there is many uses.

I read seems like millions pages on this forums. I will try to put my needs and wants in bullet points and then see what you guys have to say.

Immediate needs related to my cars hobby:
- Weld onto broken studs to get them out
- Assemble special tools for doing something like suspension puller, etc
- Weld exhaust, replace cats, etc
- Weld O2 wideband threaded nipple onto exhaust
- MAYBE do my own manifolds if I get into turbo my car, would be cool to make one myself
- Maybe do some sheet metal repairs

Around the house:
- Build some permanent metal work surfaces like table for lathe, mill, etc.
- Fix some iron railing around the house
- Build greenhouse using metal tubing (aluminum? stainless?)

At first it seems like MIG will do most of this, if not all. Seems like TIG will do all of this but be slow.

I was thinking if I go MIG than Hobart 190 will be good, but it's 220 only machine. I have 220 in garage but it would be nice if I can move it with extension cord and maybe use 110 when needed. Hobart 140 is highly praised and seem to be go to model for beginners. But I do see myself working with 1/4 metal and 140 is pushing it from what I read.

Also after reading so many pages and drooling over those TIG welds I'm not so sure and maybe I should learn TIG right away? What machine is good?

For budget: I want something which will work good and I won't have to fight with. But I am beginner and will use it occasionally only, don't need latest and greatest.

Any words of wisdom?


Looked into this a while back

I'd say start with something like this


£70.00 amazon





Although you possibly won't be able to weld exhausts and car body panels, (too thin metal), you'll be ok starting on scaffold poles, (metal for) skips, steel rsjs, etc

Read the reviews and see what people are using it for...

Also some pros carry them as a handy/quick get out, and they love them too.

Well worth £70.00
 

The Hobo

Well-Known Member
I will ask the wife she does the welding at our house
welding shannon beiste GIF
 
Looked into this a while back

I'd say start with something like this


£70.00 amazon





Although you possibly won't be able to weld exhausts and car body panels, (too thin metal), you'll be ok starting on scaffold poles, (metal for) skips, steel rsjs, etc

Read the reviews and see what people are using it for...

Also some pros carry them as a handy/quick get out, and they love them too.

Well worth £70.00
I dont like stick welding... its ok for thick steel but for general stuff a mig is the way forward
 
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