Wall prep after removing loose plaster

ChristineC

New Member
Hi,
I've recently learnt to plaster, but it's my first time preparing a wall that had water damage. I hope I can get some advice here...

I've fixed the cause of the leak, the wall has dried and I've removed the loose/blistering plaster down to the undercoat (see the photo). Can I now just clean, apply PVA to the entire wall and reskim it all? Should I use scrim tape around the patch where I've removed plaster? Or does this whole patch need to be filled to make the wall flat? (The area I've removed seems to big to fill with the gypsum easifill I use)

Thanks for advice!
Christine

plaster removed.jpg
 

Badvok

Well-Known Member
Hi christine easy diy job just build it up in layers using a straight edge around 4ft long, allowing it to dry! Then sand it and fill at the end with fine filler. Pva it first diluted with water 50/50 mix going 6inches past the hole...
 

Badvok

Well-Known Member
Hi christine easy diy job just build it up in layers using a straight edge around 4ft long, allowing it to dry! Then sand it and fill at the end with fine filler. Pva it first diluted with water 50/50 mix going 6inches past the hole...
No need to skim the whole wall..
 

bof

Well-Known Member
It's a solid wall , got signs of damp above the patch , stress crack wants attention ,,,,,,,
Get a plasterer
 

Cockney1

Well-Known Member
Hi,
I've recently learnt to plaster, but it's my first time preparing a wall that had water damage. I hope I can get some advice here...

I've fixed the cause of the leak, the wall has dried and I've removed the loose/blistering plaster down to the undercoat (see the photo). Can I now just clean, apply PVA to the entire wall and reskim it all? Should I use scrim tape around the patch where I've removed plaster? Or does this whole patch need to be filled to make the wall flat? (The area I've removed seems to big to fill with the gypsum easifill I use)

Thanks for advice!
Christine

View attachment 60200
Hi Christine, Which company and in what area did you do your Plastering apprenticeship? Did you receive any qualifications? (y)
 

ChristineC

New Member
Thanks for the advice! yep, I've got more flaky plaster to remove and will tape the stress crack before I fill. And although the whole wall doesn't need replastering, it's good practice me for as I'm learning.

I don't have a qualification - I've learnt as an apprentice of a family friend who's a professional. I'm only plastering for myself/friends & family. But loving it so far!

Thanks for the advice
 

JessThePlasterer

Queen Jess Elizabeth I
Hi,
I've recently learnt to plaster, but it's my first time preparing a wall that had water damage. I hope I can get some advice here...

I've fixed the cause of the leak, the wall has dried and I've removed the loose/blistering plaster down to the undercoat (see the photo). Can I now just clean, apply PVA to the entire wall and reskim it all? Should I use scrim tape around the patch where I've removed plaster? Or does this whole patch need to be filled to make the wall flat? (The area I've removed seems to big to fill with the gypsum easifill I use)

Thanks for advice!
Christine

View attachment 60200
Hi Christine and welcome!

give the wall two coats of pva. You could whack a bit of bonding on the patch and then skim the whole wall

I think @FreeD got a lot of advice recently on how to patch plaster so he can probably tell you 50 ways to do it now! :ROFLMAO:;)
 

Bella83

Member
Hi Christine,
Nice to see another girl on the tools!

From the sash window and the fact that there is damp, it would suggest a solid walled, traditionally built house. There is probably a crack in the (likely cement) render externally, or in the pointing if it isn't rendered. Ideally you'd want to solve that problem first (i.e. don't just fill the gaps with sealant/ more sand and cement), by rendering in appropriate materials. You can tackle the inside too but it looks like it's got cement on it as a scratch, rather than lime. You can patch it and it may last, but if there is water getting in, it will likely find its way back in. Gypsum doesn't do well if it gets wet, so if you're looking for a long term solution rather than a temporary repair, I would think about replastering the internal (but external facing) walls with lime, and rerendering externally in lime.

Hope it all works out ok :)
 

carl-the-plasterer

Well-Known Member
Hi Christine,
Nice to see another girl on the tools!

From the sash window and the fact that there is damp, it would suggest a solid walled, traditionally built house. There is probably a crack in the (likely cement) render externally, or in the pointing if it isn't rendered. Ideally you'd want to solve that problem first (i.e. don't just fill the gaps with sealant/ more sand and cement), by rendering in appropriate materials. You can tackle the inside too but it looks like it's got cement on it as a scratch, rather than lime. You can patch it and it may last, but if there is water getting in, it will likely find its way back in. Gypsum doesn't do well if it gets wet, so if you're looking for a long term solution rather than a temporary repair, I would think about replastering the internal (but external facing) walls with lime, and rerendering externally in lime.

Hope it all works out ok :)
@John j
 

carl-the-plasterer

Well-Known Member
because it's paint, grit it first if you decide to re-skim it all....this is in accordance with British Gypsum specs but make sure that paint is good and solid, any loose stuff will have to come off first.
 
If it’s no to lime plastering inside and out if rendered, build a stud wall away 50mm from the external then board and skim. Can insulate at the same time. As has been said before, gypsum doesn’t do to well with damp issues.
 
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