Venetian Suppliers/Training

OnlySublime

New Member
I’m looking into Venetian training but whenever I speak to a company about their course they’re either dead cagey and won’t talk to me or want to make a big deal about how it’s so technical. I get the feeling it’s a totally closed shop, that you can only be supplied if you’ve done their training and that actually selling training is the biggest part of their business model. I put the phone down on Impera Italia because they were so patronising. Any recommendations?
 

Stevieo

Royal Spin Doctor
Stucco&stucco wakefield.speak to Andy and he will look after you.I didnt train with him but know of applicators that have and he's very good and also uses good products in which I use my self.
Is there much work about for it?

I've had half an eye on it for a while.
 

Brimstone

Active Member
Goldtrowel do it, next door to the plastering building. Wouldn't expect them to be cagey but also might want to checkout people who can already plaster 'coz I don't think it's for beginners or part-time guys like me or Stevieo.
 

Stevieo

Royal Spin Doctor
Goldtrowel do it, next door to the plastering building. Wouldn't expect them to be cagey but also might want to checkout people who can already plaster 'coz I don't think it's for beginners or part-time guys like me or Stevieo.
Seems to me that you'd need the same sort of trowel skills as skimming.

But maybe I'm completely wrong.
 

Brimstone

Active Member
Mmm, maybe but flat, flat, flat and the patience of a saint/vehicle detailer polishing it to the N'th degree. I did a job for a vehicle detailer once - he's knowingly turned his OCD/autistic streak into a winner but it ain't for me.
 

plas1

Well-Known Member
I don't get that much mate but I push for microcement tbh and get a fair bit.i probably had 5 months worth lastyear.
 

plas1

Well-Known Member
That's where I trained around 12 years ago mate.Andy marshall runs it,nice chap and knows his stuff.
 

OnlySublime

New Member
Stucco&stucco wakefield.speak to Andy and he will look after you.I didnt train with him but know of applicators that have and he's very good and also uses good products in which I use my self.
I’ve seen stucco & stucco, looks great. Only hesitated because I’m closer to London.
 

OnlySublime

New Member
Goldtrowel do it, next door to the plastering building. Wouldn't expect them to be cagey but also might want to checkout people who can already plaster 'coz I don't think it's for beginners or part-time guys like me or Stevieo.
Saw Gold Trowel but didn’t appeal to me. Are you saying you think it’s difficult to Venetian plaster if you’ve never plastered? Really?
 

OnlySublime

New Member
Also, am I right to think companies won’t supply you unless you’ve done their product training? It all looks very closed and controlled. I could be wrong but it seems you are kinda tied in to your training companies products.
 

Danny

Administrator
Saw Gold Trowel but didn’t appeal to me. Are you saying you think it’s difficult to Venetian plaster if you’ve never plastered? Really?
its one of the best if not the best place to learn Venetian plastering.... I know so many people that have done that course and gone on to do venetian full time @BobbyJack can also confirm this
 

plas1

Well-Known Member
Not true at all.There are many finishes that can be achieved with venetian plaster and you wouldn't even know it was as most people assume it has to be shiny.Im sure other experienced applicators like robjack would agree.As I've mentioned before it can depend on clientele you have in which alot of mine want something different and bespoke.
 

OnlySublime

New Member
Not true at all.There are many finishes that can be achieved with venetian plaster and you wouldn't even know it was as most people assume it has to be shiny.Im sure other experienced applicators like robjack would agree.As I've mentioned before it can depend on clientele you have in which alot of mine want something different and bespoke.
Good to know, was so put off by Impera Italia, think its made me doubt the whole industry. I already do bespoke work with lime paint and metallics so like creatively working with a range of products. I’m used to a lot of freedom.
 

plas1

Well-Known Member
I would personally go with stucco&stucco mate as they cover all sorts and alotv of modern finishes
 

BobbyJack

Well-Known Member
Hi mate. If your nearer to Essex I would say go to goldtrowel. I know Andy personally and think he's the best at the game. If you were up north I would say Andy Robinson as I've heard good things about him.
At goldtrowel you can also learn micro cement and matallics and lots of different venetian finishes.
As far as closed shop I would agree with you to a degree. As it's a high end high price line of work companies who manufacture products don't want their gear being applied in a poor way. They want you to know what your doing that's why some won't sell unless you have done a course with them. It's understandable when their reputation is on the line. I would say you don't need to be a plasterer to learn this. The first thing when teaching a plasterer to do Venetian is to knock the plastering motion out of them. It's easier to do with someone who hasn't held a trowel. That said, there are benefits to already being in the trade and to knowing about substrates and materials. I used to teach some time ago and the best people to learn were female decorators. I found most of them were very neat and clean and tidy and once they learned how to hold a trowel the rest was quite simple. I'm not saying that the majority of blokes who spread are messy or untidy but it's quite common across the trade.

I do disagree about it being old hat. It's still increasingly popular for restaurants and bars renovation and builds etc. Also anywhere that a design team or architect is involved such as private new builds for high end markets. I'd say if you like it and if nothing else you put it in your own gaff then a course would be worthwhile
 

Brimstone

Active Member
Happy to be corrected by plas 1, I did think it was only shiny finishes. Maybe I'm wrong about the need to be able to plaster - ring the firms and ask.
 

Danny

Administrator
Goldtrowel do it, next door to the plastering building. Wouldn't expect them to be cagey but also might want to checkout people who can already plaster 'coz I don't think it's for beginners or part-time guys like me or Stevieo.
its better if you cant plaster :D
 

OnlySublime

New Member
Hi mate. If your nearer to Essex I would say go to goldtrowel. I know Andy personally and think he's the best at the game. If you were up north I would say Andy Robinson as I've heard good things about him.
At goldtrowel you can also learn micro cement and matallics and lots of different venetian finishes.
As far as closed shop I would agree with you to a degree. As it's a high end high price line of work companies who manufacture products don't want their gear being applied in a poor way. They want you to know what your doing that's why some won't sell unless you have done a course with them. It's understandable when their reputation is on the line. I would say you don't need to be a plasterer to learn this. The first thing when teaching a plasterer to do Venetian is to knock the plastering motion out of them. It's easier to do with someone who hasn't held a trowel. That said, there are benefits to already being in the trade and to knowing about substrates and materials. I used to teach some time ago and the best people to learn were female decorators. I found most of them were very neat and clean and tidy and once they learned how to hold a trowel the rest was quite simple. I'm not saying that the majority of blokes who spread are messy or untidy but it's quite common across the trade.

I do disagree about it being old hat. It's still increasingly popular for restaurants and bars renovation and builds etc. Also anywhere that a design team or architect is involved such as private new builds for high end markets. I'd say if you like it and if nothing else you put it in your own gaff then a course would be worthwhile
Thanks for your reply. Your perspective makes sense and I think I’m beginning to understand why the companies are protective with their products. I reckon I could do well - I’m in the trade, never plastered! I’ve been playing about with a heavy bodied textured plaster paint and I’m hooked, I just want to take it further now and get the technical details nailed.
 

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BobbyJack

Well-Known Member
Thanks for your reply. Your perspective makes sense and I think I’m beginning to understand why the companies are protective with their products. I reckon I could do well - I’m in the trade, never plastered! I’ve been playing about with a heavy bodied textured plaster paint and I’m hooked, I just want to take it further now and get the technical details nailed.
You can be taught a finish like this. Tough to pinpoint as it's a picture but it looks like a fine grained marmorino. Or possibly a liquid product such as cadoro
 

OnlySublime

New Member
You can be taught a finish like this. Tough to pinpoint as it's a picture but it looks like a fine grained marmorino. Or possibly a liquid product such as cadoro
This is my own work, I’ve been experimenting with a ready mixed product. I just don’t have the site experience of internal and external corners etc. I also only have this one product, although it seems really versatile. Here’s another sample I made....
I’ve been adding metallic waxes and mixing colours.
 

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