The rolling set

Status
Not open for further replies.

richardbrown

Private Member
This is the term used when you lay up the kind of metres you would normally lay in a day in ONE set, For example if you have a really big wall to do say 60 metres or a large ceiling 40m to 50m.

The idea is to mix up small batch's of gear so that you are always working with fresh plaster rather than mixing up one massive tub and it all going off at the same time. Using this method the Set is going off at different times so you can easily keep on top of it.

This is how I would approach it.

If say the ceiling is 10m by 5m this works out at 50m2 what I would do (and did on artex the other day) is break the ceiling into 3 sections and put chalk marks on the walls to indicate where the 3 sections are.

Lets call them A B and C.

Mix up and lay A .....
Mix up and lay B .....
Flatten in A
Mix up and lay c .....
Flatten in B
Second coat A
Flatten in c
Second coat b

etc etc etc

This may seem complicated so if you dont quite understand (spunkybum) then draw the ceiling on a piece of paper and divide it up into A, B and C and look at it and you will soon realise how easy and simple it is.

You will find every couple of years the need to either do this or pay a mate to help you, master this way and you'll be quids in :)

Hope this helps

Rich B
 
B

bigsegs

Guest
nice one rich..
there is another way though..
its called rolling the foreigner..
what you do is pay a gang of sponge floating europeans 50p each to do it for you, then when they think theyve finished quick trowel it up properly and get paid!
 

Render Systems

Private Member
richardbrown said:
This is the term used when you lay up the kind of metres you would normally lay in a day in ONE set, For example if you have a really big wall to do say 60 metres or a large ceiling 40m to 50m.

The idea is to mix up small batch's of gear so that you are always working with fresh plaster rather than mixing up one massive tub and it all going off at the same time. Using this method the Set is going off at different times so you can easily keep on top of it.

This is how I would approach it.

If say the ceiling is 10m by 5m this works out at 50m2 what I would do (and did on artex the other day) is break the ceiling into 3 sections and put chalk marks on the walls to indicate where the 3 sections are.

Lets call them A B and C.

Mix up and lay A .....
Mix up and lay B .....
Flatten in A
Mix up and lay c .....
Flatten in B
Second coat A
Flatten in c
Second coat b

etc etc etc

This may seem complicated so if you dont quite understand (spunkybum) then draw the ceiling on a piece of paper and divide it up into A, B and C and look at it and you will soon realise how easy and simple it is.

You will find every couple of years the need to either do this or pay a mate to help you, master this way and you'll be quids in :)

Hope this helps

Rich B
 

nelly

Private Member
I completely agree with richards idea/system but, your also need to bear in mind your limitations and experience.

If you are fairly inexperienced try this system out on an area relatively small and manageable.

basically practise the system before you practise the big meterage
 

Chris W

Well-Known Member
isnt spunkys joddy mixer a 'rolling set'?
just keep mixing smaller amounts than normal...
always fresh mix...
when you run out mix some more...
what f'cks it up is trying to knock a bag and a half up on your own, followed by another bag and a half and so on etc... soon lose it then over a big area...
slower to be faster...
 

essexandy

The Lake Governor
I couldn't agree more Chris, I've never mixed up more than a bag at a time and more often than not I use 10ltr of water to a bucket that way it's easier for the labourer to work out how much water is needed when you ask for a half bucket, they still struggle when I need a quarter bucket to finish a set.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top