Strange Blue Grit Question

ErnieH1

New Member
Hi all.
I wonder if anyone can give me a little bit of information about blue grit, as I’ve never used it.

I have a garden wall which I painted end of last summer, some strange mix was used on the wall, I’m not sure what they did but loose had come off and the top coat of render was thin and black (maybe unibond or sbr in the mix). Anyhow, I patched in where necessary and when dry painted the whole wall.
Once the weather became wet and cold, I noticed the paint blistering on the most exposed part of the wall (not bits that I’d patched), it looked like small pox there were so many blisters. Since then it got worse and has come off almost in sheets and I’m going to have to do it again when the weather breaks.

I’ve done plenty of painting over the years but have never seen masonry paint behave like this, it simply did not adhere to the surface. I did all the prepping and jet washed it down etc. before starting so am flummoxed as to the cause. Masonry painting has never caused an issue for me before.

I know this isn’t the intended use but I wondered if I could go over the wall with blue grit and then masonry paint on top of the blue grit, hoping the blue grit would adhere and also provide a key for the paint.

I’ve never seen blue grit, would it leave an awful looking texture? There’s a poor texture on the wall anyway but it’s looks good enough with a coat of paint on it, would blue grit look bad painted over or is there some other reason why this won’t work, such as you wouldn’t be able to paint directly on blue grit?

I’m just thinking out of the box at trying something different so I can’t paint it once and be done with it and thought blue grit might give me the adhesion that I need.

Anyway, it might sound mad, I don’t know but I’d welcome any advice anyone could offer about this, whether it’s possible or plain ridiculous. If this isn’t likely to work out then I might clad it as I just want it at a finished standard but if I can pull it off with a couple of coats of paint then I’d prefer to do that as it’s a very long wall and will come at a price.

Thanks in advance

Ern.
 

Monkey Boy

Well-Known Member
Dead right with the thread title ern
I’ve never known blue grit used as a stabilising primer for paint!
 

ErnieH1

New Member
Dead right with the thread title ern
I’ve never known blue grit used as a stabilising primer for paint!
Nor me but I used stabiliser and had the result described so I’m thinking outside of the box and looking for a novel solution. Is it something you’d think you could paint over? I’ve never touched the stuff and just came across it and wondered was it a possible solution, even if it seems unlikely.
 

ErnieH1

New Member
yup blue grit for internal, everbuild rendagrip external
Thank you. As said above I’ve never used either (done plenty of spread work years ago, either before these were available or they both just passed me by). I forgot to ask above but would you expect paint to adhere and set to rendagrip ok or I’m I experimenting here? I like an experiment mind.
 

ErnieH1

New Member
Give rendagrip a go and try a patch out
Post pictures too
Thanks. I think I’ll give it a go. From what I gather from the neighbours (we only moved in here 18mo ago) the paint has always come off this wall in the past. I’m not sure what’s going on with it but it’s a really odd looking mix, when I took some loose patches off, it’s really black right through. I’ll take some pics when I get around to doing it and if worst comes to worst I’ll probably cover it with composite cladding but as I said in the first post, it’s a long wall, maybe in the region of 40/50m long by about about 1.2 so it’ll be a pricy job in composite but done once and for all. So I can experiment and if that fails, get my wallet out and clad it.

Cheers
 

smoother09

Well-Known Member
Is it mouldy and damp to touch?
AdeptFarBlackandtancoonhound-small.gif
 

ErnieH1

New Member
Is it mouldy and damp to touch?
Not at all, it was very hard though. (Another one for smoother ). It’s odd really. Apart from the bits of render I had to patch and the odd bit of flaking paint, the coat I went up on was pretty solid. The new layer has completely delaminated from the old layer. The old layer underneath is still sound (so hard to see it being trapped water). It’s coming off like it does if you don’t water down your first coat on new render or copings. I’ve always found it hard to go wrong with masonry paint.
 

carl-the-plasterer

Well-Known Member
Thank you. As said above I’ve never used either (done plenty of spread work years ago, either before these were available or they both just passed me by). I forgot to ask above but would you expect paint to adhere and set to rendagrip ok or I’m I experimenting here? I like an experiment mind.
never tried it but can't see a reason why it wouldn't work....defo worth a try
 
Top