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essexandy

The Lake Governor
View attachment 55007 Also available in plastic now, mainly for drylining. Means you can put it against say door frame and get a fixed constant width without messing about with a spacer etc. with a stop bead. Also it hide a crappy background/mastic/holes etc. & allows you to wipe it out clean without ruining the wet edge.
This one in the pic looks a bit wide for me, prefer narrow so it creates a shadow (Duh). Sometimes paint the channel black to create a false shadow. On your's it'd get painted white, but I like and prefer your angled edge, v. nice.
This type of shadow gap bead would be better IMO.
fyfield-misc-06.jpg
 

Vincey

Private Member
Think the op looks great

















but I do need to go opticians but can’t get in due to cov so best I don’t comment really

 

essexandy

The Lake Governor
Whats the problem with the fitting then?
Fitting them around door frames isn't so bad as you're just butting them to the frame. Obviously the mitres need to look neat and tidy. Around the bottoms of the walls takes time to make sure that they're dead straight, level and the correct height, allowing for the different floor coverings going in different rooms.
Getting the internal and external mitres to look neat is quite a precision job for a rough old spread.
 

ChrispyUK

Well-Known Member
Fitting them around door frames isn't so bad as you're just butting them to the frame. Obviously the mitres need to look neat and tidy. Around the bottoms of the walls takes time to make sure that they're dead straight, level and the correct height, allowing for the different floor coverings going in different rooms.
Getting the internal and external mitres to look neat is quite a precision job for a rough old spread.

a good starting point is 45 degrees:coffe:

And a bubble
 

Brimstone

Well-Known Member
Fitting them around door frames isn't so bad as you're just butting them to the frame. Obviously the mitres need to look neat and tidy. Around the bottoms of the walls takes time to make sure that they're dead straight, level and the correct height, allowing for the different floor coverings going in different rooms.
Getting the internal and external mitres to look neat is quite a precision job for a rough old spread.
Thanks, I can see that being a challenge especially on an older buildings.
 
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