Skimming over gloss paint surfaces

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jaspla

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Just wondered what you all do when plastering over gloss painted walls or ceilings? I always tend to worry about the bond between this type of paint with the plaster.

I've never liked and have never used pva over these surfaces as I just don't see there being a good enough bond between the paint surface and the plaster. I've always used thistle bond it or the knauf equivalant but wondered how everyone else would normally go about this.

Then there's scoring the surface with a stanley knife to provide a key for the plaster and with a combination of coating the wall with pva too, this would probably also do a relatively good.

So what do the rest of you guys do in this situation? :-?
 
Yup thistle bondit would do the job, maybe if it is really glossy I might get some glass paper on it but wickes bonding agent will do the job

Danny
 
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dpbeds

Guest
Wickes bonding agent is fine. Don't score it if its sound it could weaken it. I'd also consider glass paper to get the shine off and also sugar soap can be good especially in a kitchen where it's greasy.
 

jaspla

New Member
I use sugar soap quite often, its great for cleaning grease and dirt off the walls. Never used wickes bonding agent, i'm going to give it a go ;)
 

Thomas

New Member
This is one of my pet hates.
I normally apply a nice coat of pva, then wait around for ages for it to pull in and go tacky. If the glossy surface is pretty much water proof, then this will take ages :mad:
Once tacky, i get a coat on and wait for that to start going off too, which again takes ages.
When its going off (hard) i get the second coat on, quite a bit thinner mix than the first, and carry on from there.
Sometimes i have found that on the first coat, even when it starts to go off, its still very wet underneath the surface. Which makes polishing a right pain sometimes.
But when im at the polishing stage, if i have to, i will mix a bit on the hawk to fill in any abnormalities that appear due to the movement which can happen underneath.
This is the only way i have found that works under these circumstances.

But im here to learn:)
 
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dpbeds

Guest
Wouldn't be happy with PVA on gloss myself. Certainly wouldn't put coat on and let dry. The purpose of that is to kill suction and gloss wouldn't have any. Think if I had to use PVA I'd just use the one coat and go on when tacky.
just IMHO tho.

:)
 

Thomas

New Member
Wouldn't be happy with PVA on gloss myself. Certainly wouldn't put coat on and let dry. The purpose of that is to kill suction and gloss wouldn't have any. Think if I had to use PVA I'd just use the one coat and go on when tacky.
just IMHO tho.

:)

That what i meant. A coat of pva, leave till tacky, then a coat of plaster, then take the lines out till the plaster starts getting hard, then second coat of plaster.
 

Thomas

New Member
And the reason i do use pva first, is because i have seen guys plastering straight on to a glossy surface and later down the line it just flaked off.
I find that a coat of pva keeps the plaster on the wall.
But its important that the glue gets nice and sticky, otherwise obviously the plaster just slides all over the place.
 
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