Scaffolding

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#1
If you're working indoors right and you've got this realy awkward ceiling lets say, up a staircase or in those really old houses that can't be done with just batons and steps or whatever, how do you go about it? do you contact a company in to make some kind of platform to make the job easier or what? would you get the tenant to do it or would you do it yourself and add it to the price?
 

Vincey

Private Member
#2
Don’t get me started, have a job atm high ceilings client didn’t get scaffolding sorted I refusing to do ceiling until it’s sorted , client had an attempt at work at the height off a stupid poxy tower and slipped and nearly died
Proper scaffolding laid out could cost £500-£1000 but end of the day who cares if you stay alive
 

ChrispyUK

Well-Known Member
#3
If you're working indoors right and you've got this realy awkward ceiling lets say, up a staircase or in those really old houses that can't be done with just batons and steps or whatever, how do you go about it? do you contact a company in to make some kind of platform to make the job easier or what? would you get the tenant to do it or would you do it yourself and add it to the price?
It would depend on the job as to whether you needed to get someone in, but for most jobs, there's enough kit around that will do the job, so hire in what's necessary and charge the customer for hire, time setting up, etc etc. I wouldn't leave it up to the customer to sort, they won't be doing the job so won't understand what exactly you need.
Dont take chances, get the correct equipment for the job. Had to hire these in last week, expensive, but atleast I was safe.

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#4
It would depend on the job as to whether you needed to get someone in, but for most jobs, there's enough kit around that will do the job, so hire in what's necessary and charge the customer for hire, time setting up, etc etc. I wouldn't leave it up to the customer to sort, they won't be doing the job so won't understand what exactly you need.
Dont take chances, get the correct equipment for the job. Had to hire these in last week, expensive, but atleast I was safe.

View attachment 25133
hahahahahaha
 
Love CBD

Smudger1

Well-Known Member
#6
I got all sorts of gear to get access built up over the years and charge on job for set up and removal after, they've paid for themselves over n over over the years
 
#7
Where there is a will there is a way! If the ceiling is so awkward that it requires special attention then this should be reflected in the quote. Most of time it can be done with a mix of ladders, batons, and a stairwell scaffold. The stairwell scaffolds can be useful for the most part, then possibly running batons off them to other secure points of access including ladders which i advise securing at the bottom with a small timber screwed into the floor. You can fix timbers to the wall with heavy duty fixings, then fix batons to them but you must be careful of the spans, you can also double up on the batons to help with the spans. Whatever you do go over the top and ensure support at all points before using!. Wish i had a pic of the last set up i did the other week but it was a mix of what i just said. Other than than that hit it in multiple managable sections and feather it in if that helps. One more thing, always set up you own access, its not worth the risk! Unless you are paying a company for a legit platform that is.
 

Gibbo

Well-Known Member
#8
If you're working indoors right and you've got this realy awkward ceiling lets say, up a staircase or in those really old houses that can't be done with just batons and steps or whatever, how do you go about it? do you contact a company in to make some kind of platform to make the job easier or what? would you get the tenant to do it or would you do it yourself and add it to the price?
Oxford stair system