S&C rendering on to reconstructed stone, bead then scratch or scratch then bead!?

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Krafty

New Member
Hi lads,

I'm s&c rendering over old 70's reconstructed stone work.
As you can imagine it's not a completely flat surface to go on as the block surface is up and down.

I'm thinking either, thin scratch coat to bring everything straight then bead so all the beads sit straight and pukka. Then another scratch and top coat.

Or,

Put the beads on fixing to the high points of the blocks then a good scratch, and then top coat.

I'm thinking the first option is going to work better but the drawback being it'll end up being 3 coats of s&c which will obviously take a little more time but make life easier when beading.

Thoughts on this one chaps?
 

Dropsalot

Private Member
I'd do it like you say first.
Scratch and dub out.....bead.....scratch flat....float out and finish.
3 coats but less heartache.
 

Krafty

New Member
I'd do it like you say first.
Scratch and dub out.....bead.....scratch flat....float out and finish.
3 coats but less heartache.

Yeah to be honest, it is a no brainer isn't it!
Why risk pissed up beads!
Thanks for your reply matey
 

Rigsby

TPF Special Forces
You will need a bonding agent on the stone first. There are several ready mixed ones on the market which you apply the day before and let dry or you can use sbr mixed with cement and apply as a slurry.

Build up to the top of the peaks, then carry on a normal. You may be best leaving the build up to set though or it could slide with the weight.
 

Krafty

New Member
You will need a bonding agent on the stone first. There are several ready mixed ones on the market which you apply the day before and let dry or you can use sbr mixed with cement and apply as a slurry.

Build up to the top of the peaks, then carry on a normal. You may be best leaving the build up to set though or it could slide with the weight.

Yeah mate, I am going to use sbr and cement slurry
Thanks for your input
 

Jerseyboy

Active Member
I find it easier using a splatter box over stone or granite or smooth concrete
It's quicker and gets into all the awkward spaces and leaves a better key than slurry
 
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