ripples in skim

Status
Not open for further replies.

Minh

Member
Must be the badminton you play? Or w***ing:-0

Badminton requires the body to be relaxed. I have hardly any body fat so my muscles look ripped. I'm starting a new company this year: the Buff Plasterer. I'll charge desperate cougars double to see me in my thong :RpS_biggrin:
 

Minh

Member
Badminton requires the body to be relaxed. I have hardly any body fat so my muscles look ripped. I'm starting a new company this year: the Buff Plasterer. I'll charge desperate cougars double to see me in my thong :RpS_biggrin:

For guys I charge triple or quadruple for an oiled up body. No touching or my pimp will beat the s%#* out of you :RpS_biggrin:
 

euan

Member
I have just plastered a large job ceilings all good but the walls have rippled badly.
I have started using a sprayer instead of a brush.
The walls look perfect until you shine a light on them, the painter has a hali and is shinning it sideways across the wall!
The building has had no heating and it has got an ambient temp of 0,, there are walls there that are taking 2 weeks to sry.
It is a new build ao all straight onto board, never seen it this bad before, every wall!
Any ideas if the temp has effected the plaster after being dry troweled and taken so long to dry?
All the ripples are 2 foot high, vericle and 6 inches apart.

All advise I
 

Minh

Member
How long have you been plastering? Most plastering looks decent under normal lighting conditions. Have you ever looked at external render when the sun hits the wall at an acute angle? Unless the work is spot on, the sunlight will expose all imperfections.

Those ripples are visible because the painter is shining a light across the wall and exposing your workmanship. Plaster sets due to a chemical reaction which crystallises the particles: the spray bottle will have no effect on causing ripples and neither will the cold temperature.

The fact that they are evenly spaced out and at similar heights is not an anomaly but simply the spacing you used when troweling up. You can avoid this happening by cross troweling.

You can tell him to shove it up his a*** because normal viewing distance is 2m :RpS_biggrin:
 
Last edited:

Jace

Well-Known Member
oh ffs, the ripples are because you havent troweld up properly have a read through the thread and youll see many many many if not toooo many ways to avoid tiger stripes, the best way is to do it properly.

problem is called tiger stripes
solution is to put someone who knows what there doin on the trowel, close the blade angle dnt hit it too soon.............actually fack writing them all down there all in this post.

and tell the decorator to get that bloody light away from the wall if he doesnt break the bloody light.

dan can you set up a sticky for this tiger stripes stuff, it comes up soo often its mind boggling
 

wiganlad

Private Member
Try this. First coat on then with a clean trowel give it a quick wipe flat before laying on your second coat. I do this by crossing the wall quickly with a big spat. This way there are no lines or bumps in your first coat which will naturally go of quicker than your second one eliminating the chance of any showing through. Just a thought not saying its right or any one is doing anything wrong . Good luck
 

Nisus

Elite Member
Ankers,

This is the how I teach my students the difference between ripples and tiger stripes.

Question: What causes ripples?

Answer: Plaster that has been laid on too thick.

Reason: When you pass the trowel over a thick coat that has not pulled in yet, you end up causing some parts of the plaster to slide over itself causing ripples. Multi finish does not like to go on thick because it cannot hold its shape properly. When you approach 6mm you will notice that multi begins to sag under its own weight.

Solution: Let the plaster pull in more, and apply light pressure when laying it down. You also need to frequently discard of the excess plaster that has accumulated on the face of your trowel.

How to improve: Don't lay on thick coats, 2mm followed by 1mm is the way to proceed.


Question: What are tigers stripes?

Answer: Lines caused by a trowel that has been opened up too much when wet troweling.

Reason: When the trowel is opened up, you begin the process of scraping instead of spreading. If the trowel is opened up too much, instead of just scraping away minor lines you also end up scraping away hundredths of a mm from the surface. Even on a relatively flat surface, those hundredths of a mm will end up leaving cosmetic tiger stripes when the plaster dries (in most cases these stripes are not noticeable when the surface is painted).

Solution: Don't open the trowel too much when wet troweling and make sure the face is always wet. Only move about 12 inches at a time otherwise the water on the face of the trowel will run out and you then run the risk of tearing the plaster.

How to improve: Keep the trowel wet and work in small controlled fan shaped sweeps. Don't apply too much pressure and always overlap the previous sweep. A fast and smooth sweep is what you should be aiming for.

:)

What a load of boll0cks PMSL :RpS_lol:
 

raggles

Private Member
Just noticed this thread and how disapointed am i :-( i aint got me reading glasses on and thought the R was a N
 

mucker

Member
Im getting tiger stripes when skimming on board lately and ive never had problems with it before not changed anything ive been doing such a pain in the ass did a big ceiling today and it striped like mad i did get them out in the hard trowel. you cudnt feel them on the surface but could see them. they are so frustrating. how hard do u lot let your 1st coat go before u top it?
 

Minh

Member
Im getting tiger stripes when skimming on board lately and ive never had problems with it before not changed anything ive been doing such a pain in the ass did a big ceiling today and it striped like mad i did get them out in the hard trowel. you cudnt feel them on the surface but could see them. they are so frustrating. how hard do u lot let your 1st coat go before u top it?

If you can't feel them then it doesn't matter. You can put your second coat on straight after your first :)
 

Arti

Well-Known Member
A snorkel for first coat,.. a parka for second coat.:RpS_wink:

snorkel's were awesome till you got the fur wet and it tickled ya beak when you were zipped right up............poor peripheral vision as well during snowball fights....................:RpS_thumbdn:
 

hagggggishunter

New Member
This is a bit like the how long is a peace of string question.To me the answer is simple ,you have to work with the plaster, not all sets are the same ,some take early ,some take ages to go. Its all about experiance and good skill with the trowel. I have found that the multi finish has changed so much in the last 12 months it now requires no water or a very little to trowel up , i have even gone back to using an old carbon steel trowel that i have had for bloody years to trowel up with as i find it gives a better finish. Don't put on more than you can handle, keep each coat as neat as poss ,dont lay in when the first coat is to wet ,and don't put on to thick. when you start the first trowel you will know straight away what is required so adjust your method from there.

used multi a long time ago and changed to board, a new builder got me in but already had multi on the job so i had to use..............best thing ever. multi is so much better now than it was a few year ago
 

spunky

Private Member
I reckon its the fat congealing off you're trowel pulling at the wall as you go, that's why you get them at the topthird and bottom because you're changing the angle of you're trowel and letting the fat catch against the wall and dragging
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top