Reskim of curved ceilings.

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el_indio

Member
Amigos.
I'm in the middle of reskimming an entire house for a client who has stripped all the anaglypta from every room (yes even the ceilings!)
The walls, reveals etc no problem at all and finished lovely (although had to work furious because the glorious weather last week giving me no time at all to breathe between coats!)
HOWEVER...every room has that old style of curved ceilings going to the walls and I can't figure out what to do about it tbh. If you look at the pictures you will see what I mean...you'll also see that the previous spread has avoided the problem by feathering the skim up to the radius (not a problem at the time as the house got covered head to toe in wallpaper) Customer wants a nice crisp paint job now though and the anaglypta has left a bumpy surface (especially on the curved coving areas) which needs skimming.
Thought about trying a taping knife but not sure.
All the walls are done now (have done it back to front and left ceilings till last on this job)
Any advice again much appreciated!

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jdplast

Active Member
I've done a couple of houses like this i used a refina skimming spatch and brushed the corners as nothing would get in there (and I tried everything) I saw It painted when I went back a few weeks later to do additional work and they looked mint.
 
a sponge helps and I use a small plastic fire exit sign gets into the tight spots as it has no handle and a load of finger action for those even tighter area's
 

john simpson

Well-Known Member
i just round them , my MT does it no bother , 4" shouldnt stick
You might need to form a deeper round because of the previous plasterer working to it.
I find it helps to put the coats on going back and forward if you know what i mean , like both sides of the trowel.
Also to cut fairly deep into the skim when its starting to go off.
I dont think the trowel will stick , if it does go the other way.
Never used the refina or that , maybe they are better
 

Loren

Active Member
I'd like to know how they where originally done and what was used to form the turn ? Anyone on here know?
I don't know if this helps since I'm in the US and we do things bit differently and I do things most others don't touch around here. I put in a lot of ceiling coves around here I need to have them match into drywall a lot of the time. You have to start with a dead straight ceiling and wall adjacent to where you will be installing the cove. Next lath it out, then I make a fairly ridged aluminum template of the negative of the cove. Then I mount it into a wood frame that will hold the template at a 90 angle, the wood frame has a rail on top and one on the bottom. After this is built I then can establish where I can set a top track and a bottom track, snap lines where the tracks go and then set 1x2 wood or plastic track across the ceiling & wall for your frame to slide on . Then I paint bonding agent on the edges of the wall & ceiling. Heavy scratch coat with Structolite (or Hardwall). Then for the finish run work lime putty & gauging or more structolite with drywall compound. I pull the template as close to the corners as I can get it and then when the mud is set I come back and miter the corners in with my mitre rods (you have to always try to hold your mitre rod level). Back when they had a lot of this kind of work to do the old timers might build a template that was mounted at a 45° angle on the frame which allowed you to get really close into the corner, have to do a bit of geometry to get the curve of the template correct in that case.
 

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el_indio

Member
Thanks for the responses all, think I'll give the plaziflex a go on the curves.
Similar situation in the bedrooms except that in these the radius hasn't a lip like in the lounge so no edge to work up to.
Was thinking with these other rooms to do the ceilings first as per usual and bring the skim down onto the walls maybe an inch or so past where the radius stops, then the next day when skimming walls just feather them in.
Sound like a plan?
 

jdplast

Active Member
Thanks for the responses all, think I'll give the plaziflex a go on the curves.
Similar situation in the bedrooms except that in these the radius hasn't a lip like in the lounge so no edge to work up to.
Was thinking with these other rooms to do the ceilings first as per usual and bring the skim down onto the walls maybe an inch or so past where the radius stops, then the next day when skimming walls just feather them in.
Sound like a plan?

the ones I did had no lip, they went straight into the wall, I got the ceiling and two opposite walls on together and stopped the other two walls a few inches below the curve as you said, as long as your a good un a piecing in wont be a problem. and even if you didn't get the piecing in bang on first go you can always aims it or sand it afterwards.
 

Loren

Active Member
@Loren do you then board the ceiling and walls and blend in?
I don't usually do the sheetrock hanging part that's usually the sheetrock & taping contractor (who in many cases I am subcontracting through them), they usually want me to finish my work blending into their sheetrock. I've currently got two sheetrock contractors who call on me to do whatever Plastering that needs to take place so they can get the job they are bidding on.
 

Loren

Active Member
Piece of piss, bang it on, don't overthink it,
Some jobs if you are matching a cove in, it depends on how nicely the original work was done. I've found a lot of jobs that were just banged on and don't look too bad, where you can match them just by running a straight edge. And then there's some that are so straight & nice you need to run them with a template. Last job I did the contractor thought I'd have to make a template & I was able to do just as well mitering the coves in with an 8' straight edge.
 

Loren

Active Member
Some jobs if you are matching a cove in, it depends on how nicely the original work was done. I've found a lot of jobs that were just banged on and don't look too bad, where you can match them just by running a straight edge. And then there's some that are so straight & nice you need to run them with a template. Last job I did the contractor thought I'd have to make a template & I was able to do just as well mitering the coves in with an 8' straight edge.
Although the original post was about skimming over a cove in that case no sense in thinking about using a template.
 

choppa

Well-Known Member
Just cross your fingers and hope they got a s**t load of sand paper lol. There's a tool called corner master a rubber thing may help you. If I was doing it I'd pull on the ceiling then swoop down the cerve reducing the chance of a fatty corner don't play with them to much. I'd free hand the corner to or use a external twitcher. Good luck much love there's loads of technics no one is wrong. Ps sorry if there's 50 spelling milkshakes.
 

el_indio

Member
the ones I did had no lip, they went straight into the wall, I got the ceiling and two opposite walls on together and stopped the other two walls a few inches below the curve as you said, as long as your a good un a piecing in wont be a problem. and even if you didn't get the piecing in bang on first go you can always aims it or sand it afterwards.

Cheers JD, I was thinking about giving it a go that way. Like an arch, then the final 2 walls next day. The upstairs rooms much smaller than the lounge so hopefully not be too much bother!
 
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