Repairing a concrete window soffit

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Wonderhorse

New Member
Hi, this is my first post, I'm a little nervous. I'm not a plasterer as such, but I can do small repairs, small areas of skimming etc.

I've been asked to repair the attached window soffit (the picture shows the damaged soffit, the other pic shows one of the existing good ones), I've done some research and believe this is the correct approach;

Clean down RSJ’s to remove flaking material
Coat with red oxide primer
Affix Expamet mesh to underside of RSJ with CPT1
Apply scratch coat and topcoat of cement based render to match existing

How would I get that bevelled finish along the edge?

Any advice on any of this would be appreciated.

Thank you.
 

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malc

TPF Special Forces
the big problem is you are not a plasterer.
you will need to make your self up a tool to run the bevelled edge.
i am only looking at the photo and guessing the size, but try a small length of 3 quarters of an inch copper pipe cut in half. this is how we used to make our external angle trowels.
 

Olican

Private Member
One thing I learned (the hard way) when I started out is how to say no to certain jobs. Tricky job that there. CP1 is a multi purpose bonding agent I think, gripfill type gear
 

Wonderhorse

New Member
Thank you for your replies. I meant CT1, it’s a grab adhesive, they also do silicone that you can use in wet conditions, brilliant for my line of work; general repairs. I can’t think plasterers would have too many uses for it,

I am nervous about this repair, contacted a couple of local plasterers who are far too busy so I thought I’d give it a try. I think I’ll ring round a few more.

Thanks again for your responses.
 

Rigsby

TPF Special Forces
This is a small but awkward job that’s going to take time and skill. So much time it will appear too expensive for what it is.

Ok in January when no one else want to employ you. Otherwise best left.
 

Spray

Well-Known Member
Don’t be scared of this mate nothing hard about it ! I would render carrier board over steel ! Poly base over that filling out the edge !
Then use a good cement base coat to form the detail bull nose angle tool and rest with a straight edge
 

Wonderhorse

New Member
Thanks for your vote of confidence. I have finaly found a plasterer who is going to come out and price it. I’ll let you know how I get on. He’s my last chance otherwise I will have to do it myself.
 

Rigsby

TPF Special Forces
Just thought of another way?

Take an accurate template of the whole head and dimensions.

Send a detailed drawing and pictures to Buildlite in Thurcroft Rotherham. They will reproduce it in polystyrene with a Arcote finish any colour you want to a ral code.

Replace the whole top section. It will be very accurate and a mornings work.
 

Wonderhorse

New Member
Brilliant idea. Their website is very good, great products. I will see how things turn out with this plasterer first, if no good I’ll persue this option.

Thank you.
 

ncowan

Member
Hi, this is my first post, I'm a little nervous. I'm not a plasterer as such, but I can do small repairs, small areas of skimming etc.

I've been asked to repair the attached window soffit (the picture shows the damaged soffit, the other pic shows one of the existing good ones), I've done some research and believe this is the correct approach;

Clean down RSJ’s to remove flaking material
Coat with red oxide primer
Affix Expamet mesh to underside of RSJ with CPT1
Apply scratch coat and topcoat of cement based render to match existing

How would I get that bevelled finish along the edge?

Any advice on any of this would be appreciated.
concrete repairs Brisbane
Thank you.
I have a two-piece birdbath that belonged to my Grandma. It is well over 50yrs old and has developed a crack in the bowl.

The bowl is approximately 80-100lbs and about 1-2in thick, the crack started on one side and now goes across. On one side the crack is all the way through and the birdbath is leaking all of its water in one-two days.

I stood at Home Depot and got cross-eyed trying to figure out which stuff to use. Some of the "fixes" require making the crack larger(I don't want the bowl to break). I found one that you could use on swimming pools but then you need to seal it. The sealant comes in one-gallon quantities!

I also do not want to use anything that will harm the birds.

Any ideas of what to use?
 

themucky1

Well-Known Member
I have a two-piece birdbath that belonged to my Grandma. It is well over 50yrs old and has developed a crack in the bowl.

The bowl is approximately 80-100lbs and about 1-2in thick, the crack started on one side and now goes across. On one side the crack is all the way through and the birdbath is leaking all of its water in one-two days.

I stood at Home Depot and got cross-eyed trying to figure out which stuff to use. Some of the "fixes" require making the crack larger(I don't want the bowl to break). I found one that you could use on swimming pools but then you need to seal it. The sealant comes in one-gallon quantities!

I also do not want to use anything that will harm the birds.

Any ideas of what to use?
Can you post a picture of the bird bath?
 
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